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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Water Research, 15 November 2015, Vol.85, pp.148-157
    Description: Since rivers are typically subject to rapid changes in microbiological water quality, tools are needed to allow timely water quality assessment. A promising approach is the application of predictive models. In our study, we developed multiple linear regression (MLR) models in order to predict the abundance of the fecal indicator organisms (EC), intestinal enterococci (IE) and somatic coliphages (SC) in the Lahn River, Germany. The models were developed on the basis of an extensive set of environmental parameters collected during a 12-months monitoring period. Two models were developed for each type of indicator: 1) an extended model including the maximum number of variables significantly explaining variations in indicator abundance and 2) a simplified model reduced to the three most influential explanatory variables, thus obtaining a model which is less resource-intensive with regard to required data. Both approaches have the ability to model multiple sites within one river stretch. The three most important predictive variables in the optimized models for the bacterial indicators were NH –N, turbidity and global solar irradiance, whereas chlorophyll content, discharge and NH –N were reliable model variables for somatic coliphages. Depending on indicator type, the extended mode models also included the additional variables rainfall, O content, pH and chlorophyll . The extended mode models could explain 69% (EC), 74% (IE) and 72% (SC) of the observed variance in fecal indicator concentrations. The optimized models explained the observed variance in fecal indicator concentrations to 65% (EC), 70% (IE) and 68% (SC). Site-specific efficiencies ranged up to 82% (EC) and 81% (IE, SC). Our results suggest that MLR models are a promising tool for a timely water quality assessment in the Lahn area.
    Keywords: Escherichia Coli ; Intestinal Enterococci ; Somatic Coliphages ; Bathing Water Quality ; Monitoring ; Management Tool ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0043-1354
    E-ISSN: 1879-2448
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 01 December 2015, Vol.12(12), pp.15943-15959
    Description: Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic bacterium of coastal environments known for sporadically causing severe foodborne or wound infections. Global warming is expected to lead to a rising occurrence of V. vulnificus and an increasing incidence of human infections in Northern Europe. So far, infections...
    Keywords: Multilocus Sequence Typing ; Virulence-Associated Traits ; Genotypes ; Pathogenicity Potential ; Vibrio Infection ; Public Health Risk ; Global Warming ; Public Health
    E-ISSN: 1660-4601
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Microbial Ecology, 2013, Vol.65(4), pp.1052-1067
    Description: The number of reported Vibrio -related wound infections associated with recreational bathing in Northern Europe has increased within the last decades. In order to study the health risk from potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. in the central Wadden Sea, the seasonal and spatial distribution of Vibrio vulnificus , Vibrio parahaemolyticus , Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio cholerae were investigated at ten recreational beaches in this area over a 2-year period. V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were found to be omnipresent all year round in the study area, while V. vulnificus occurrence was restricted to summer months in the estuaries of the rivers Ems and Weser. Multiple linear regression models revealed that water temperature is the most important determinant of Vibrio spp. occurrence in the area. Differentiated regression models showed a species-specific response to water temperature and revealed a particularly strong effect of even minor temperature increases on the probability of detecting V. vulnificus in summer. In sediments, Vibrio spp. concentrations were up to three orders of magnitude higher than in water. Also, V . alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were found to be less susceptible towards winter temperatures in the benthic environment than in the water, indicating an important role of sediments for Vibrio ecology. While only a very small percentage of tested V. parahaemolyticus proved to be potentially pathogenic, the presence of V. vulnificus during the summer months should be regarded with care.
    Keywords: Estuaries -- Analysis ; Hydrology -- Analysis ; Public Health -- Analysis ; Sediments (Geology) -- Analysis ; Cholera Toxin -- Analysis;
    ISSN: 0095-3628
    E-ISSN: 1432-184X
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  • 4
    In: The ISME Journal, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.542
    Description: Coastal sands filter and accumulate organic and inorganic materials from the terrestrial and marine environment, and thus provide a high diversity of microbial niches. Sands of temperate climate zones represent a temporally and spatially highly dynamic marine environment characterized by strong physical mixing and seasonal variation. Yet little is known about the temporal fluctuations of resident and rare members of bacterial communities in this environment. By combining community fingerprinting via pyrosequencing of ribosomal genes with the characterization of multiple environmental parameters, we disentangled the effects of seasonality, environmental heterogeneity, sediment depth and biogeochemical gradients on the fluctuations of bacterial communities of marine sands. Surprisingly, only 3-5% of all bacterial types of a given depth zone were present at all times, but 50-80% of them belonged to the most abundant types in the data set. About 60-70% of the bacterial types consisted of tag sequences occurring only once over a period of 1 year. Most members of the rare biosphere did not become abundant at any time or at any sediment depth, but varied significantly with environmental parameters associated with nutritional stress. Despite the large proportion and turnover of rare organisms, the overall community patterns were driven by deterministic relationships associated with seasonal fluctuations in key biogeochemical parameters related to primary productivity. The maintenance of major biogeochemical functions throughout the observation period suggests that the small proportion of resident bacterial types in sands perform the key biogeochemical processes, with minimal effects from the rare fraction of the communities.
    Keywords: Biodiversity ; Soil Microbiology ; Bacteria -- Classification ; Silicon Dioxide -- Analysis;
    ISSN: 1751-7362
    E-ISSN: 17517370
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  • 5
    In: The ISME Journal, 2009, Vol.3(7), p.780
    Description: Bacterial community structure and microbial activity were determined together with a large number of contextual environmental parameters over 2 years in subtidal sands of the German Wadden Sea in order to identify the main factors shaping microbial community structure and activity in this habitat. Seasonal changes in temperature were directly reflected in bacterial activities and total community respiration, but could not explain variations in the community structure. Strong sediment depth-related patterns were observed for bacterial abundances, carbon production rates and extracellular enzymatic activities. Bacterial community structure also showed a clear vertical variation with higher operational taxonomic unit (OTU) numbers at 10-15 cm depth than in the top 10 cm, probably because of the decreasing disturbance by hydrodynamic forces with sediment depth. The depth-related variations in bacterial community structure could be attributed to vertical changes in bacterial abundances, chlorophyll a and NO(3)(-), indicating that spatial patterns of microbes are partially environmentally controlled. Time was the most important single factor affecting microbial community structure with an OTU replacement of up to 47% over 2 years and a contribution of 34% to the total variation. A large part of this variation was not related to any environmental parameters, suggesting that temporal variations in bacterial community structure are caused by yet unknown environmental drivers and/or by stochastic events in coastal sand habitats. Principal ecosystem functions such as benthic oxygen consumption and extracellular hydrolysis of organic matter were, however, at a high level at all times, indicating functional redundancy in the microbial communities.
    Keywords: Biology;
    ISSN: 1751-7362
    E-ISSN: 17517370
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