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  • 1
    In: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, October 2017, Vol.71(10), pp.662-662
    Description: Byline: Hajime Baba ***** No abstract is available for this article. *****
    Keywords: Mental Disorders;
    ISSN: 1323-1316
    E-ISSN: 1440-1819
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Affective Disorders, December 2011, Vol.135(1-3), pp.332-335
    Description: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the nerve growth factor family and plays a critical role in growth, differentiation, maintenance and synaptic plasticity of neuronal systems. Previous studies have demonstrated lower serum BDNF concentrations in major depressive disorder (MDD), with concentrations negatively correlating with the severity of the disease. However, few investigations have examined the relationship between serum BDNF and detailed clinical symptoms. The aim of present study was to clarify the magnitudes of the relationships between various depressive symptom and serum BDNF. Serum BDNF concentrations were evaluated from 109 inpatients with MDD and 163 healthy controls. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAM-D), and symptoms were categorized into four groups: “anxiety somatization”; “cognitive disturbance”; “retardation”; and “sleep disturbance”. Serum BDNF concentration was significantly lower in patients with MDD compared to controls (p 〈 0.001). We identified significant negative correlations between serum BDNF concentration and both total score (R = − 0.19, p = 0.044) and “anxiety somatization” sub-score (R = − 0.32, p = 0.001) from the HAM-D in patients with MDD. All patients in the present study were on antidepressant medications. These results suggest that serum BDNF level may offer a biological marker for anxiety symptoms in medicated patients with MDD.
    Keywords: Depression ; Bdnf ; Symptoms ; Anxiety ; State Marker
    ISSN: 0165-0327
    E-ISSN: 1573-2517
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of clinical psychiatry, January 2012, Vol.73(1), pp.115-20
    Description: Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that a history of depression increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, particularly among individuals with early-onset depression. On the other hand, recent studies have suggested that a higher amyloid-β protein (Aβ)40 to Aβ42 ratio may be associated with the future onset of Alzheimer's disease. Our objective was to assess whether the pathophysiology of early-onset depression may involve or affect Aβ metabolism. In this extension of a case-control pilot study, 193 inpatients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) (mean age = 55.9 years) from the Juntendo Koshigaya Hospital, Saitama, Japan, and 413 healthy controls from the community (mean age = 56.6 years) were recruited between May 2004 and April 2009. Serum Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels, Aβ40/Aβ42 ratio, and other clinical and biological factors were compared between controls and patients in 3 age groups: young (〈 40 years), middle-aged (≥ 40 to 〈 65 years), and elderly (≥ 65 years). Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. All patients were receiving antidepressant medication at the time of the study, and doses of current antidepressants were converted to an equivalent imipramine dose. The serum Aβ40/Aβ42 ratio was significantly higher in MDD patients than controls in all age groups (young: P = .003; middle-aged: P 〈 .001; elderly: P = .006). These differences were also observed in noncarriers of the apolipoprotein E ε4 allele. Our findings suggest that Aβ metabolism may be affected in depression; these findings also possibly answer the question of why even early-onset depression is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease.
    Keywords: Amyloid Beta-Peptides -- Blood ; Depressive Disorder, Major -- Blood ; Peptide Fragments -- Blood
    ISSN: 01606689
    E-ISSN: 1555-2101
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Psychiatry Research, January 2018, Vol.259, pp.191-196
    Description: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that depression may be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the biological mechanisms of the transition from depression to AD are still not clear. Changes of amyloid β protein (Aβ) metabolism and increased glucocorticoid (GC) levels have been found in both depression and AD. Moreover, several studies in animal models have demonstrated that GC administration changes Aβ metabolism. To reveal whether GC affects amyloid metabolism in patients with depression, we evaluated serum levels of Aβ40, Aβ42 and cortisol at admission in 187 inpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 224 healthy comparisons. Additionally, we re-evaluated the serum levels of Aβs in 27 patients with MDD 1 year later. The results of multiple regression analyses revealed that serum cortisol and Aβ levels are not correlated at the time of admission. However, serum cortisol levels at admission correlated with serum Aβ42 levels and Aβ40/Aβ42 ratio 1 year later. These findings suggest that increased cortisol in patients with MDD may influence the metabolism of Aβ over prolonged periods of time.
    Keywords: Depression ; Alzheimer'S Disease ; Amyloid ; Glucocorticoid ; Cortisol ; Serum ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0165-1781
    E-ISSN: 1872-7123
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Psychiatry Research, 28 February 2015, Vol.225(3), pp.322-325
    Description: The aim of the present study was to examine whether the specific personality traits, Harm-Avoidance (HA) and Self-Directedness (SD) as measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), were predictive for subsequent depressive episodes in remitted patients with major depressive disorders (MDDs) over a 4-year follow-up. A total of 109 inpatients with MDD participated in this study. The subjects completed the TCI when they were assessed to be in remission. They were divided into high or low HA groups and high or low SD groups, as discriminated by the quartile value. A total of 69 patients were followed-up over a 4-year period or until recurrence. Both Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox׳s proportional hazards regression analysis indicated that patients with a low SD score had a significantly shorter time to recurrence from remission than patients with a high SD score even when some prognostic predictors were controlled for. In contrast, HA was not found to be a predictor of recurrence for future depressive episodes. A part of MDD patients with low scores in Self-Directedness are likely to develop depression over a subsequent period of time. Interventions that improve SD may help to delay recurrence of depression in MDD patients.
    Keywords: Depression ; Tci ; Personality ; Follow-Up ; Recurrence ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0165-1781
    E-ISSN: 1872-7123
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Psychiatry Research, August 15, 2014, Vol.218(1-2), p.101(5)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.04.013 Byline: Akiko Nagane, Hajime Baba, Yoshiyuki Nakano, Hitoshi Maeshima, Mana Hukatsu, Kazuhiro Ozawa, Toshihito Suzuki, Heii Arai Abstract: Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are known to present with cognitive deficits; however, the presence of these deficits in the remitted state have been inconsistent. One of the most important factors potentially contributing to inconsistencies between studies may be the influence of medications. To explore the influence of antidepressants on cognitive performance in remitted MDD, we evaluated memory and executive functions using Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised and Stroop Color and Word Test, and compared performance among 50 medicated (29 treated with tricyclic antidepressants [TCA], 21 treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors) and 19 medication-free MDD patients and 31 controls. The results showed that all 3 MDD groups had significantly lower performance for verbal memory compared with controls. Both medicated groups showed significantly lower performance for visual memory compared with controls; however, the medication-free group did not differ from controls. For the executive function, only the TCA group showed a significantly lower performance compared with controls. These results suggest that cognitive impairment remained even in remitted patients with MDD, however, part of this impairment may be influenced by class-specific antidepressant side effects. Author Affiliation: (a) Juntendo University Mood Disorder Project (JUMP), Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo Koshigaya Hospital, Saitama, Japan (b) Shumeikai Minami-saitama Hospital, Saitama, Japan (c) Shumeikai Izumi Clinic, Saitama, Japan (d) Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Article History: Received 12 August 2013; Revised 6 December 2013; Accepted 6 April 2014
    Keywords: Drugs -- Comparative Analysis ; Tricyclic Antidepressants -- Comparative Analysis ; Medical Research -- Comparative Analysis ; Major Depressive Disorder -- Comparative Analysis
    ISSN: 0165-1781
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 7
    Language: Japanese
    In: Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyu no shinpo, July 2016, Vol.68(7), pp.753-65
    Description: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that suffering from depression and bipolar disorder may be risk factors for developing dementia. A mechanism of interactions of several factors, such as vascular disease and glucocorticoid, has been speculated to play a role in the development of dementia. It is suggested that the onset of dementia can be prevented or delayed by preventing the onset and recurrence of depression and bipolar disorder. In the prevent of depression, the management of daily life, such as diet and exercise, is important. Recently, the possibility of preventive effects of antidepressants and lithium on developing dementia has been suggested, and a future intervention study is expected.
    Keywords: Bipolar Disorder -- Complications ; Dementia -- Prevention & Control ; Depression -- Complications
    ISSN: 1881-6096
    E-ISSN: 13448129
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  • 8
    Article
    Article
    Language: Japanese
    In: Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyu no shinpo, September 2018, Vol.70(9), pp.961-970
    Description: Apathy and depression are frequently observed in neurological disorders including dementia. Because the symptoms of both these states overlap and apathy is commonly comorbid with depression, the discrimination of these states can be challenging. A method to clinically distinguish between these states may be to focus on the primary motivation underlying mood, emotion, motivation, activity and interests, rather than focusing on the patients' complaints about the 'lack of motivation'.
    Keywords: Apathy ; Motivation ; Dementia -- Complications ; Depression -- Diagnosis
    ISSN: 1881-6096
    E-ISSN: 13448129
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Affective Disorders, 20 December 2012, Vol.143(1-3), pp.84-88
    Description: Depression may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Large cohort studies have shown that recurrent depression is associated with a risk of developing dementia. Other studies have documented smaller hippocampal volume in patients with recurrent depression. It is speculative that a greater risk of developing dementia may result from a higher number of previous depressive episodes. This study compared patients with recurrent and single-episode depression in the remitted stage, and healthy controls to elucidate the impact of the number of depressive episodes on memory. Logical memory and visual reproduction subtests of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised were given to 68 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) (30 patients with a single episode and residual 38 patients with recurrent multiple episodes) and 57 healthy controls. The patients with MDD received memory assessment at the time of initial remission and at the follow-up period 3 years after remission. At the time of initial remission, scores of both logical memory and visual reproduction subtests were significantly lower in both patient groups compared with healthy controls. At follow-up, memory dysfunction of the single-episode group disappeared, whereas scores in the recurrent group remained significantly lower than those of the single-episode group and controls. All patients in the present study were on antidepressant medications. Patients with recurrent MDD with multiple depressive episodes showed residual memory dysfunction even after 3 years of remission. Persistence of memory deficits in the recurrent depression may be a risk factor for developing dementia.
    Keywords: Depression ; Memory ; Recurrence ; Longitudinal ; Remission
    ISSN: 0165-0327
    E-ISSN: 1573-2517
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Affective Disorders, 01 December 2017, Vol.223, pp.126-129
    Description: The Japanese archipelago stretches over 4000 km from north to south and has four large islands: Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu. Previously, using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-auto questionnaire version (TEMPS-A), we compared the hyperthymic scores of residents in Sapporo, Obihiro, Takaoka, Koshigaya, and Oita cities (which are located at latitudes of 43°N, 42°N, 36°N, 36°N and 33°N with various combinations of ambient temperament and sunshine in Japan, respectively). We found that latitude predicted significant variance in hyperthymic temperament, and that ambient temperature, but not sunshine, significantly affected hyperthymic temperament scores. However, the analysis failed to consider the effects of naturally occurring low-dose lithium on temperament. In addition to the TEMPS-A data previously collected, we measured lithium levels of the five cities. The effect of temperature, sunshine, and lithium levels on hyperthymic temperament was analyzed for the five cities. A stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that lithium levels as well as latitude, but not temperature or sunshine, predicted significant variance in hyperthymic temperament scores. Hyperthymic temperament scores were significantly and positively associated with lithium levels whereas they were significantly and negatively associated with latitude. The light, temperature, lithium exposure that residents actually received was not measured. The number of regions studied was limited. The findings might not be generalized to residents across Japan or other countries. The present findings suggest that lithium in drinking water may positively maintain hyperthymic temperament, and that latitude may negatively maintain it.
    Keywords: Lithium ; Latitude ; Temperature ; Sunshine ; Hyperthymic Temperament
    ISSN: 0165-0327
    E-ISSN: 1573-2517
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