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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Plant physiology, August 2014, Vol.165(4), pp.1604-1617
    Description: To investigate the functional importance of Proton Gradient Regulation5-Like1 (PGRL1) for photosynthetic performances in the moss Physcomitrella patens, we generated a pgrl1 knockout mutant. Functional analysis revealed diminished nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) as well as decreased capacity for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in pgrl1. Under anoxia, where CEF is induced, quantitative proteomics evidenced severe down-regulation of photosystems but up-regulation of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase complex, plastocyanin, and Ca sensors in the mutant, indicating that the absence of PGRL1 triggered a mechanism compensatory for diminished CEF. On the other hand, proteins required for NPQ, such as light-harvesting complex stress-related protein1 (LHCSR1), violaxanthin de-epoxidase, and PSII subunit S, remained stable. To further investigate the interrelation between CEF and NPQ, we generated a pgrl1 npq4 double mutant in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacking both PGRL1 and LHCSR3 expression. Phenotypic comparative analyses of this double mutant, together with the single knockout strains and with the P. patens pgrl1, demonstrated that PGRL1 is crucial for acclimation to high light and anoxia in both organisms. Moreover, the data generated for the C. reinhardtii double mutant clearly showed a complementary role of PGRL1 and LHCSR3 in managing high light stress response. We conclude that both proteins are needed for photoprotection and for survival under low oxygen, underpinning a tight link between CEF and NPQ in oxygenic photosynthesis. Given the complementarity of the energy-dependent component of NPQ (qE) and PGRL1-mediated CEF, we suggest that PGRL1 is a capacitor linked to the evolution of the PSII subunit S-dependent qE in terrestrial plants.
    Keywords: Biological sciences -- Biology -- Botany ; Physical sciences -- Physics -- Microphysics ; Health sciences -- Medical conditions -- Symptoms ; Biological sciences -- Biology -- Biological adaptation ; Physical sciences -- Physics -- Matter ; Biological sciences -- Biology -- Systems biology ; Physical sciences -- Physics -- Microphysics ; Biological sciences -- Biology -- Genetics ; Biological sciences -- Biology -- Botany ; Physical sciences -- Physics -- Microphysics;
    ISSN: 00320889
    E-ISSN: 1532-2548
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Plant physiology, May 2017, Vol.174(1), pp.35-46
    Description: The thermophilic alga thrives in extreme environments (low pH and temperature between 40°C and 56°C). In this study, we investigated the acclimation process of the alga to a colder temperature (25°C). A long-term cell growth experiment revealed an extensive remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus in the first 250 h of acclimation, which was followed by cell growth to an even higher density than the control (grown at 42°C) cell density. Once the cells were shifted to the lower temperature, the proteins of the light-harvesting antenna were greatly down-regulated and the phycobilisome composition was altered. The amount of PSI and PSII subunits was also decreased, but the chlorophyll to photosystems ratio remained unchanged. The 25°C cells possessed a less efficient photon-to-oxygen conversion rate and require a 2.5 times higher light intensity to reach maximum photosynthetic efficiency. With respect to chlorophyll, however, the photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate of the 25°C culture was 2 times higher than the control. Quantitative proteomics revealed that acclimation requires, besides remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus, also adjustment of the machinery for protein folding, degradation, and homeostasis. In summary, these remodeling processes tuned photosynthesis according to the demands placed on the system and revealed the capability of to grow under a broad range of temperatures.
    Keywords: Temperature ; Acclimatization -- Physiology ; Photosynthesis -- Physiology ; Rhodophyta -- Physiology
    ISSN: 00320889
    E-ISSN: 1532-2548
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Plant physiology, October 2018, Vol.178(2), pp.583-595
    Description: In plants, the photosystem I (PSI) core complex stably associates with its light-harvesting chlorophyll / complex I (LHCI) to form the PSI-LHCI supercomplex. The vascular plant PSI core complex associates with four distinct LHCI subunits, whereas that of the green alga binds nine distinct LHCI subunits (LHCA1-LHCA9). The stoichiometry and configuration of these LHCI subunits in the PSI-LHCI supercomplex of remain controversial. Here, we determined the stoichiometry of the nine distinct LHCI subunits relative to PSI subunits through uniform labeling of total proteins using C. We separated the nine LHCI polypeptides by three different sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems. Our data revealed that the PSI-LHCI supercomplex contains two LHCA1 proteins and one of each of the other eight LHCI subunits. Subsequently, we identified their cross-linked products by immunodetection and mass spectrometry to determine the configuration of the 10 LHCI subunits within the PSI-LHCI supercomplex. Furthermore, analyses of PSI-LHCI complexes isolated from Δ and Δ mutants and oligomeric LHCI from a PSI-deficient (Δ/) mutant provided supporting evidence for the LHCI subunit configuration. In conclusion, eight LHCI subunits bind to the PSI core at the site of PSAF subunit in two layers: LHCA1-LHCA8-LHCA7-LHCA3 from PSAG to PSAK, in the inner layer, and LHCA1-LHCA4-LHCA6-LHCA5 in the outer layer. The other two LHCI subunits, LHCA2 and LHCA9, bind PSAB between PSAG and PSAH, PSAG-LHCA9-LHCA2-PSAH. Our study provides new insights into the LHCI configuration linked to the PSI core.
    Keywords: Models, Structural ; Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii -- Metabolism ; Light-Harvesting Protein Complexes -- Metabolism ; Photosystem I Protein Complex -- Metabolism
    E-ISSN: 1532-2548
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  • 4
    In: Bioinformatics, 2012, Vol. 28(7), pp.1052-1053
    Description: Summary: pymzML is an extension to Python that offers (i) an easy access to mass spectrometry (MS) data that allows the rapid development of tools, (ii) a very fast parser for mzML data, the standard data format in MS and (iii) a set of functions to compare or handle spectra. pymzML requires Python2.6.5+ and is fully compatible with Python3. The module is freely available on or pypi, is published under LGPL license and requires no additional modules to be installed. 〈p〉〈bold〉Contact:〈/bold〉 〈email〉christian@fufezan.net〈/email〉〈/p〉
    Keywords: Biology;
    ISSN: 1367-4803
    E-ISSN: 1460-2059
    E-ISSN: 13674811
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP, October 2013, Vol.12(10), pp.2774-90
    Description: Iron is a crucial cofactor in numerous redox-active proteins operating in bioenergetic pathways including respiration and photosynthesis. Cellular iron management is essential to sustain sufficient energy production and minimize oxidative stress. To produce energy for cell growth, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses the metabolic flexibility to use light and/or carbon sources such as acetate. To investigate the interplay between the iron-deficiency response and growth requirements under distinct trophic conditions, we took a quantitative proteomics approach coupled to innovative hierarchical clustering using different "distance-linkage combinations" and random noise injection. Protein co-expression analyses of the combined data sets revealed insights into cellular responses governing acclimation to iron deprivation and regulation associated with photosynthesis dependent growth. Photoautotrophic growth requirements as well as the iron deficiency induced specific metabolic enzymes and stress related proteins, and yet differences in the set of induced enzymes, proteases, and redox-related polypeptides were evident, implying the establishment of distinct response networks under the different conditions. Moreover, our data clearly support the notion that the iron deficiency response includes a hierarchy for iron allocation within organelles in C. reinhardtii. Importantly, deletion of a bifunctional alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH1), which is induced under low iron based on the proteomic data, attenuates the remodeling of the photosynthetic machinery in response to iron deficiency, and at the same time stimulates expression of stress-related proteins such as NDA2, LHCSR3, and PGRL1. This finding provides evidence that the coordinated regulation of bioenergetics pathways and iron deficiency response is sensitive to the cellular and chloroplast metabolic and/or redox status, consistent with systems approach data.
    Keywords: Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii -- Physiology ; Iron -- Deficiency
    ISSN: 15359476
    E-ISSN: 1535-9484
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Physiology, 19 June 2014, Vol.165(4), pp.1604-1617
    Description: To investigate the functional importance of Proton Gradient Regulation5-Like1 (PGRL1) for photosynthetic performances in the moss Physcomitrella patens, we generated a pgrl1 knockout mutant. Functional analysis revealed diminished nonphotochemical...
    Keywords: Life Sciences ; Moss ; Physcomitrella Patens ; Algae ; Chlamydomonas Rheinhardtii ; Stress Acclimation ; High Light ; Anoxia ; Photosynthesis ; Photoprotection ; Cyclic Electron Flow ; Photosystem II ; Botany
    ISSN: 0176-1617
    Source: Hyper Article en Ligne (CCSd)
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: BBA - Bioenergetics, September 2018, Vol.1859, pp.e34-e34
    Keywords: Chemistry
    ISSN: 0005-2728
    E-ISSN: 1879-2650
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: 2013, Vol.9(6), p.e1003475
    Description: The fungus Fusarium fujikuroi causes “bakanae” disease of rice due to its ability to produce gibberellins (GAs), but it is also known for producing harmful mycotoxins. However, the genetic capacity for the whole arsenal of natural compounds and their role in the fungus' interaction with rice remained unknown. Here, we present a high-quality genome sequence of F. fujikuroi that was assembled into 12 scaffolds corresponding to the 12 chromosomes described for the fungus. We used the genome sequence along with ChIP-seq, transcriptome, proteome, and HPLC-FTMS-based metabolome analyses to identify the potential secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and to examine their regulation in response to nitrogen availability and plant signals. The results indicate that expression of most but not all gene clusters correlate with proteome and ChIP-seq data. Comparison of the F. fujikuroi genome to those of six other fusaria revealed that only a small number of gene clusters are conserved among these species, thus providing new insights into the divergence of secondary metabolism in the genus Fusarium . Noteworthy, GA biosynthetic genes are present in some related species, but GA biosynthesis is limited to F. fujikuroi , suggesting that this provides a selective advantage during infection of the preferred host plant rice. Among the genome sequences analyzed, one cluster that includes a polyketide synthase gene ( PKS19 ) and another that includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene ( NRPS31 ) are unique to F. fujikuroi . The metabolites derived from these clusters were identified by HPLC-FTMS-based analyses of engineered F. fujikuroi strains overexpressing cluster genes. In planta expression studies suggest a specific role for the PKS19 -derived product during rice infection. Thus, our results indicate that combined comparative genomics and genome-wide experimental analyses identified novel genes and secondary metabolites that contribute to the evolutionary success of F. fujikuroi as a rice pathogen. ; Fungi produce numerous “secondary metabolites” (SMs) that are not essential for life but can provide an advantage under natural conditions, e.g. in fungal-host interactions. Here, we conducted the most comprehensive analysis to date of secondary metabolism in fungi using . This fungus causes “bakanae” disease of rice and is best known for its ability to produce gibberellins (GAs). We show that GA production is limited to and provides a selective advantage during infection of the preferred host plant rice. Generation and analysis of a high-quality genome sequence combined with comparisons to six other genomes revealed the presence of 45 mostly unknown SM gene clusters. We provide a broad spectrum of experimental data including epigenetic, transcriptional, proteomic and chemical product analyses under different nitrogen and pH conditions. Two of the SM clusters (PKS19 and NRPS31) are not present in any other sequenced fungal genome. expression studies revealed that the otherwise silent PKS19 cluster is induced on rice, but not on maize, suggesting a specific role for the -derived product during rice infection. Together, our results demonstrate the tremendous potential of a single fungal species to produce a diversity of SMs that likely contributes to adaptation to environmental changes.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology
    ISSN: 1553-7366
    E-ISSN: 1553-7374
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 05/10/2018, Vol.122(18), pp.10217-10230
    ISSN: 1932-7447
    E-ISSN: 1932-7455
    Source: American Chemical Society (via CrossRef)
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Sci Rep, 2016, Vol.6(1), pp.28557-28557
    Description: In this study, a new reliable, economic and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (〉1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst.
    Keywords: Article;
    ISSN: 2045-2322
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