Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, Sept, 2012, Vol.52, p.43(6)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2012.04.001 Byline: Bertrand Guenet (a), Sabrina Juarez (b), Gerard Bardoux (c), Luc Abbadie (a), Claire Chenu (b) Abstract: A significant fraction of soil organic carbon, named stable organic carbon (C) pool, has residence times longer than centuries and its vulnerability to land use or climatic changes is virtually unknown. Long-term bare fallows offer a unique opportunity to isolate the stable organic pool of soils and study its properties. We investigated the vulnerability of the stable organic C pool to fresh organic matter inputs by comparing the mineralization in a long-term bare fallow soil with that of an adjacent arable soil, containing stable C as well as more labile C. For this, we amended or not the soil samples with two different.sup.13C-labelled fresh organic matter (straw or cellulose). In all cases we found a positive priming effect (i.e. an increased mineralization of soil organic carbon) when fresh organic matter was added. By comparing the results obtained on both soils, we estimated that half of the "primed" C in the arable soil due to straw addition as fresh organic matter, originated from the stable C pool. Our results suggest that under such conditions, which frequently occur, the stable pool of soil organic matter may largely contribute to soil extra-CO.sub.2 emissions due to priming effect. Consequently, the C storage potential of this pool may be modified by changes in land use and/or biomass production that might change the priming of the mineralization of the stable pool of soil organic carbon. Author Affiliation: (a) UPMC, UMR 7618 Bioemco, 46 rue d'Ulm, F-75230 Paris, France (b) AgroParisTech, UMR 7618 Bioemco, Batiment EGER, 78850 Thiverval Grignon, France (c) CNRS, UMR 7618 Bioemco, Batiment EGER, 78850 Thiverval Grignon, France Article History: Received 31 August 2011; Revised 1 April 2012; Accepted 2 April 2012
    Keywords: Soil Carbon ; Cellulose
    ISSN: 0038-0717
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 04 September 2010, Vol.2011(338), pp.127-141
    Description: Byline: Muhammad Sanaullah (1), Abad Chabbi (1,2), Jens Leifeld (3), Gerard Bardoux (1), Daniel Billou (1), Cornelia Rumpel (1) Keywords: Organic matter; Root litter; Decomposition; Stable isotopes; Physical fractionation; Subsoil horizons; Temperature; Moisture Abstract: Mechanisms leading to high mean residence times of organic matter in subsoil horizons are poorly understood. In lower parts of the soil profile root material contributes greatly to soil organic matter (SOM). The objective of this study was to elucidate the decomposition dynamics of root-derived C and N in different soil depths during a 3 year field experiment and to examine the importance of different protection mechanisms as well as abiotic factors for the decomposition dynamics. Additionally, we assessed the effect of root litter addition on native SOM. Our conceptual approach included the exposure of litterbags with 13.sup.C and 15.sup.N labeled wheat root material mixed to loamy agricultural soil at three different soil depths (30, 60 and 90 cm). During the incubation period, we monitored soil temperature, humidity and the incorporation of root derived C and N into the soil microbial biomass and physical SOM fractions. Our results showed that abiotic decay conditions were better in subsurface horizons compared to the topsoil. Root litter addition significantly increased the size of microbial biomass in all three soil horizons. In the topsoil, root-derived C decomposition was significantly higher in the first 6 months of incubation compared to subsoil horizons. In 60 and 90 cm depths, a lag phase with development of soil microbial biomass seemed to be prevailing before decomposition was activated. For root-derived N, similar decomposition kinetics could be observed in top- and subsoil horizons. Despite of higher SOM contents, better soil structure and higher microbial activity in the topsoil horizon compared to subsoil horizons, the amounts of root-derived C and N remaining after 3 years were similar for all three depths. Most of the root-derived C and N was present as organo-mineral complexes or occluded in soil aggregates (oPOM), illustrating similar importance of these two protection mechanisms in all three soil depths. Addition of fresh root litter caused small losses of native soil C whereas native N was retained. We conclude that despite of similar SOM protection mechanisms, there are distinct differences in decomposition dynamics of root litter between top- and subsoil horizons. In the long run, the better abiotic decay conditions prevailing in subsoil horizons may compensate for their poorer physico-chemical characteristics. Author Affiliation: (1) BIOEMCO, CNRS-INRA-Universite Paris VI, Thiverval-Grignon, France (2) UEFE, INRA Poitou-Charentes, Lusignan, France (3) Agroscope Reckenholz-Tanikon Research Station ART, Zurich, Switzerland Article History: Registration Date: 24/08/2010 Received Date: 12/03/2010 Accepted Date: 23/08/2010 Online Date: 04/09/2010 Article note: Responsible Editor: M. Francesca Cotrufo.
    Keywords: Environmental Sciences ; Agriculture ; Environmental Sciences ; Botany
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, September 2010, Vol.42(9), pp.1640-1642
    Description: A miniaturised method developed to measure the mineralisation of C-labelled organic compounds in small soil samples is presented. Soil samples (〈0.5 g) were placed in wells of microtiter plates with CO traps (NaOH-soaked glass microfiber filters) and amended with C-labelled substrate. The microtiter plate was covered with a seal and placed in a microplate clamp system to ensure that each well was airtight. After incubation, the CO traps were transferred to tightly sealed glass phials under CO -free atmosphere and the C-labelled CO was released by addition of H PO . The CO was measured by micro-GC and its isotopic signature was determined using a GC-IRMS. The qualitative and quantitative efficiency of the microplate system was demonstrated by comparison with direct measurement of CO in the headspace of phials in which similarly treated soil samples had been incubated. The two methods showed similar mineralisation rates for added C-substrates but the apparent mineralisation of soil organic matter was greater with the microtiter plate method. The microplate system presented here is suitable for studying the mineralisation of different kinds of C-labelled substrates in small soil samples and allows analysis of functional and molecular characteristics on the same micro-samples.
    Keywords: 13c-Labelling ; Co2 Trap ; Acid Release ; Mineralisation ; Microbial Scale ; Agriculture ; Chemistry
    ISSN: 0038-0717
    E-ISSN: 1879-3428
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    In: Global Change Biology, February 2014, Vol.20(2), pp.633-640
    Description: The impact of climate change on the stability of soil organic carbon () remains a major source of uncertainty in predicting future changes in atmospheric levels. One unsettled issue is whether the mineralization response to temperature depends on mineralization rate. Long‐term (〉25 years) bare fallow experiments () in which the soil is kept free of any vegetation and organic inputs, and their associated archives of soil samples represent a unique research platform to examine this issue as with increasing duration of fallow, the lability of remaining total decreases. We retrieved soils from experiments situated at Askov (Denmark), Grignon (France), Ultuna (Sweden), and Versailles (France) and sampled at the start of the experiments and after 25, 50, 52, and 79 years of bare fallow, respectively. Soils were incubated at 4, 12, 20, and 35 °C and the evolved monitored. The apparent activation energy () of was then calculated for similar loss of at the different temperatures. The was always higher for samples taken at the end of the bare‐fallow period, implying a higher temperature sensitivity of stable than of labile . Our results provide strong evidence for a general relationship between temperature sensitivity and stability upon which significant improvements in predictive models could be based.
    Keywords: Activation Energy ; Long‐Term Bare Fallow Experiments ; Soil Carbon Dynamic ; Stable Soil Carbon ; Temperature Sensitivity
    ISSN: 1354-1013
    E-ISSN: 1365-2486
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Soil biology & biochemistry, 2012, Vol.52, pp.43-48
    Description: A significant fraction of soil organic carbon, named stable organic carbon (C) pool, has residence times longer than centuries and its vulnerability to land use or climatic changes is virtually unknown. Long-term bare fallows offer a unique opportunity to isolate the stable organic pool of soils and study its properties. We investigated the vulnerability of the stable organic C pool to fresh organic matter inputs by comparing the mineralization in a long-term bare fallow soil with that of an adjacent arable soil, containing stable C as well as more labile C. For this, we amended or not the soil samples with two different ¹³C-labelled fresh organic matter (straw or cellulose). In all cases we found a positive priming effect (i.e. an increased mineralization of soil organic carbon) when fresh organic matter was added. By comparing the results obtained on both soils, we estimated that half of the “primed” C in the arable soil due to straw addition as fresh organic matter, originated from the stable C pool. Our results suggest that under such conditions, which frequently occur, the stable pool of soil organic matter may largely contribute to soil extra-CO₂ emissions due to priming effect. Consequently, the C storage potential of this pool may be modified by changes in land use and/or biomass production that might change the priming of the mineralization of the stable pool of soil organic carbon. ; p. 43-48.
    Keywords: Soil Organic Carbon ; Cellulose ; Land Use Change ; Carbon Sequestration ; Soil Properties ; Mineralization ; Organic Matter ; Arable Soils ; Biomass Production ; Soil Sampling
    ISSN: 0038-0717
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, September 2012, Vol.52, pp.43-48
    Description: A significant fraction of soil organic carbon, named stable organic carbon (C) pool, has residence times longer than centuries and its vulnerability to land use or climatic changes is virtually unknown. Long-term bare fallows offer a unique opportunity to isolate the stable organic pool of soils and study its properties. We investigated the vulnerability of the stable organic C pool to fresh organic matter inputs by comparing the mineralization in a long-term bare fallow soil with that of an adjacent arable soil, containing stable C as well as more labile C. For this, we amended or not the soil samples with two different C-labelled fresh organic matter (straw or cellulose). In all cases we found a positive priming effect (i.e. an increased mineralization of soil organic carbon) when fresh organic matter was added. By comparing the results obtained on both soils, we estimated that half of the “primed” C in the arable soil due to straw addition as fresh organic matter, originated from the stable C pool. Our results suggest that under such conditions, which frequently occur, the stable pool of soil organic matter may largely contribute to soil extra-CO emissions due to priming effect. Consequently, the C storage potential of this pool may be modified by changes in land use and/or biomass production that might change the priming of the mineralization of the stable pool of soil organic carbon. ► Soil stable C from a long term bare fallow can be de-stabilized by priming effect. ► Priming effect intensity dependend on fresh OM quality. ► Priming intensity was little or not affected by the amount of fresh OM added. ► 9-46% of mineralized SOC due to priming effet originated from stable C.
    Keywords: Priming Effect ; Stable Carbon ; Long-Term Bare Fallow ; Mineralization ; 13c-Fresh Organic Matter ; Agriculture ; Chemistry
    ISSN: 0038-0717
    E-ISSN: 1879-3428
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 2011, Vol.338(1), pp.127-141
    Description: Mechanisms leading to high mean residence times of organic matter in subsoil horizons are poorly understood. In lower parts of the soil profile root material contributes greatly to soil organic matter (SOM). The objective of this study was to elucidate the decomposition dynamics of root-derived C and N in different soil depths during a 3 year field experiment and to examine the importance of different protection mechanisms as well as abiotic factors for the decomposition dynamics. Additionally, we assessed the effect of root litter addition on native SOM. Our conceptual approach included the exposure of litterbags with 13 C and 15 N labeled wheat root material mixed to loamy agricultural soil at three different soil depths (30, 60 and 90 cm). During the incubation period, we monitored soil temperature, humidity and the incorporation of root derived C and N into the soil microbial biomass and physical SOM fractions. Our results showed that abiotic decay conditions were better in subsurface horizons compared to the topsoil. Root litter addition significantly increased the size of microbial biomass in all three soil horizons. In the topsoil, root-derived C decomposition was significantly higher in the first 6 months of incubation compared to subsoil horizons. In 60 and 90 cm depths, a lag phase with development of soil microbial biomass seemed to be prevailing before decomposition was activated. For root-derived N, similar decomposition kinetics could be observed in top- and subsoil horizons. Despite of higher SOM contents, better soil structure and higher microbial activity in the topsoil horizon compared to subsoil horizons, the amounts of root-derived C and N remaining after 3 years were similar for all three depths. Most of the root-derived C and N was present as organo-mineral complexes or occluded in soil aggregates (oPOM), illustrating similar importance of these two protection mechanisms in all three soil depths. Addition of fresh root litter caused small losses of native soil C whereas native N was retained. We conclude that despite of similar SOM protection mechanisms, there are distinct differences in decomposition dynamics of root litter between top- and subsoil horizons. In the long run, the better abiotic decay conditions prevailing in subsoil horizons may compensate for their poorer physico-chemical characteristics.
    Keywords: Organic matter ; Root litter ; Decomposition ; Stable isotopes ; Physical fractionation ; Subsoil horizons ; Temperature ; Moisture
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
    Source: Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Soil biology & biochemistry, 2010, Vol.42, pp.1640-1642
    Description: A miniaturised method developed to measure the mineralisation of 13C-labelled organic compounds in small soil samples is presented. Soil samples (〈0.5 g) were placed in wells of microtiter plates with CO2 traps (NaOH-soaked glass microfiber filters) and amended with 13C-labelled substrate. The microtiter plate was covered with a seal and placed in a microplate clamp system to ensure that each well was airtight. After incubation, the CO2 traps were transferred to tightly sealed glass phials under CO2-free atmosphere and the 13C-labelled CO2 was released by addition of H3PO4. The CO2 was measured by micro-GC and its isotopic signature was determined using a GC-IRMS. The qualitative and quantitative efficiency of the microplate system was demonstrated by comparison with direct measurement of CO2 in the headspace of phials in which similarly treated soil samples had been incubated. The two methods showed similar mineralisation rates for added 13C-substrates but the apparent mineralisation of soil organic matter was greater with the microtiter plate method. The microplate system presented here is suitable for studying the mineralisation of different kinds of 13C-labelled substrates in small soil samples and allows analysis of functional and molecular characteristics on the same micro-samples. ; Includes references ; p. 1640-1642.
    Keywords: Soil Organic Carbon ; Laboratory Techniques ; Isotope Labeling ; New Methods ; Methodology ; Stable Isotopes ; Soil Sampling ; Carbon Dioxide ; Gas Chromatography ; Gas Emissions ; Headspace Analysis ; Soil Microorganisms ; Carbon ; Mineralization ; Phosphoric Acid ; Sample Size ; Microtiter Plates ; Miniaturized Methods
    ISSN: 0038-0717
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2014, Vol.721(1), pp.35-44
    Description: In the context of global change, eroded soil carbon fate and its impact on aquatic ecosystems CO 2 emissions are subject to intense debates. In particular, soil carbon mineralization could be enhanced by its interaction with autochthonous carbon, a process called priming effect, but experimental evidences of this process are scarce. We measured in a microcosm experiment simulating oligo-mesotrophic and eutrophic aquatic conditions how quickly soil organic matter (SOM) sampled in diverse ecosystems was mineralized as compared to mineralization within soil horizons. For both nutrient loads, 13 C-glucose was added to half of the microcosms to simulate exudation of labile organic matter (LOM) by phytoplankton. Effects of LOM on soil mineralization were estimated using the difference in δ 13 C between the SOM and the glucose. After 45 days of incubation, the mean SOM mineralization was 63% greater in the aquatic context, the most important CO 2 fluxes arising during the first days of incubation. Nutrients had no significant effect on SOM mineralization and glucose addition increased by 12% the mean SOM mineralization, evidencing the occurrence of a priming effect.
    Keywords: Soil erosion ; Oligo-mesotrophic systems ; Eutrophic systems ; Carbon cycle ; Aquatic priming effect ; Freshwater ecosystems
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, September 2010, Vol.42(9), pp.1472-1478
    Description: Effects of fire on the functioning of the soil microbial community are largely unknown. In this study, we addressed the charcoal mineralisation potential of microbial inocula extracted from burned and unburned soil. The mineralisation of charcoal was analysed during a 1 month incubation experiment under controlled conditions with and without substrate addition. The aim of the study was to elucidate (1) the indirect effect of fire on the functioning of the soil microbial community in terms of charcoal degradation and (2) the possibility to stimulate this degradation by addition of two substrates of increasing complexity. Our conceptual approach included the monitoring of CO emission from microcosms containing laboratory-made charcoal and microbial inocula from burned and unburned soil with and without C labelled glucose and cellulose. Our results showed higher charcoal mineralisation without substrate addition in microcosms with the inocula from unburned soil compared to burned soil. Charcoal mineralisation was stimulated by the addition of glucose, whereas cellulose addition did not induce a priming effect. We observed a higher stimulation of charcoal mineralisation induced by glucose for the inoculum from burned soil compared to the inoculum from unburned soil. We concluded that fire did affect the functioning of the soil microbial community in terms of charcoal degradation and that the important priming effect induced by glucose may be explained by an increase of the overall microbial activity, rather than selective stimulation of charcoal degrading microbial communities.
    Keywords: Forest Fire ; Black Carbon ; Charcoal ; Priming ; Agriculture ; Chemistry
    ISSN: 0038-0717
    E-ISSN: 1879-3428
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages