Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
Topic
  • 1
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: Science (New York, N.Y.), 18 May 2012, Vol.336(6083), pp.844-7
    Description: Ancestral Pan, the shared predecessor of humans, bonobos, and chimpanzees, lived in social dominance hierarchies that created conflict through individual and coalitional competition. This ancestor had male and female mediators, but individuals often reconciled independently. An evolutionary trajectory is traced from this ancestor to extant hunter-gatherers, whose coalitional behavior results in suppressed dominance and competition, except in mate competition. A territorial ancestral Pan would not have engaged in intensive warfare if we consider bonobo behavior, but modern human foragers have the potential for full-scale war. Although hunter-gatherers are able to resolve conflicts preemptively, they also use mechanisms, such as truces and peace pacts, to mitigate conflict when the costs become too high. Today, humans retain the genetic underpinnings of both conflict and conflict management; thus, we retain the potential for both war and peace.
    Keywords: Conflict (Psychology) ; Pan Paniscus ; Pan Troglodytes
    ISSN: 00368075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Article
    Article
    In: Nature, 2013, Vol.496(7445), p.304
    Keywords: Genetic Variation ; Heredity ; Genome -- Genetics ; Smell -- Physiology;
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Article
    Article
    In: Nature, 2013, Vol.495(7441), p.312
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: Nature, April 18, 2013, Vol.496(7445), p.304(2)
    Description: [...]the 'MHC peptide hypothesis' suggests9 that olfactory sensing of the key (the peptide ligand) provides information about the lock (the MHC protein). Olfactory recognition of MHC-bound peptides suggests that the exquisite sensitivity and precision of sensory evaluation might be used to detect the presence of infectious agents, because peptides derived from these agents are 'presented' to cells of the immune system by MHC molecules and might eventually appear in the urine.
    Keywords: Genomics – Research ; Peptides – Research ; Animal Behavior – Genetic Aspects
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 2012, Vol.35(1), pp.19-20
    Description: Abstract Hunter-gatherer punishment involves costs and benefits to individuals and groups, but the costs do not necessarily fit with the assumptions made in models that consider punishment to be altruistic – which brings in the free-rider problem and the problem of second-order free-riders. In this commentary, I present foragers' capital punishment patterns ethnographically, in the interest of establishing whether such punishment is likely to be costly; and I suggest that in many cases abstentions from punishment that might be taken as defections by free-riders are actually caused by social-structural considerations rather than being an effect of free-rider genes. This presentation of data supplements the ethnographic analysis provided by Guala.
    Keywords: Punishment ; Ethnography ; Capital Punishment ; Social Psychology; Interaction Within (Small) Groups (Group Processes, Space Use, Leadership, Coalitions, & Teamwork) ; Article;
    ISSN: 0140-525X
    E-ISSN: 1469-1825
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    In: The British Journal of Criminology, 2011, Vol. 51(3), pp.518-534
    Description: Homicide often spurs lethal retaliation through self-help and this response is widespread among human foragers because brothers are often co-resident in mobile bands. The roots of this behaviour can be traced back to the shared ancestor of humans, chimpanzees and bonobos, which had strong tendencies to form social dominance hierarchies and to fight, and strong tendencies for alpha peacemakers to stop fights. As well-armed humans were becoming culturally modern, they were living in mobile egalitarian hunting bands that lacked such strong peace makers and lethal retaliation had free play. This continued with tribal agriculturalists who were equally egalitarian, but they tended to live in patrilineal communities, with the males staying put at marriage, and people with such fraternal interest groups developed elaborate rules for feuding. State formation finally brought centralized social control sufficient to put an end to feuding, but self-help killing still continues in certain contexts in modern society.
    Keywords: Human Nature ; Fraternal Interest Groups ; Homicide ; Feuding ; Self - Help ; Hunter - Gatherers ; Tribes
    ISSN: 0007-0955
    E-ISSN: 1464-3529
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: Current Biology, 11 September 2012, Vol.22(17), pp.R722-R732
    Description: All multicellular organisms protect themselves against pathogens using sophisticated immune defenses. Functionally interconnected humoral and cellular facilities maintain immune homeostasis in the absence of overt infection and regulate the initiation and termination of immune responses directed against pathogens. Immune responses of invertebrates, such as flies, are innate and usually stereotyped; those of vertebrates, encompassing species as diverse as jawless fish and humans, are additionally adaptive, enabling more rapid and efficient immune reactivity upon repeated encounters with a pathogen. Many of the attributes historically defining innate and adaptive immunity are in fact common to both, blurring their functional distinction and emphasizing shared ancestry and co-evolution. These findings provide indications of the evolutionary forces underlying the origin of somatic diversification of antigen receptors and contribute to our understanding of the complex phenotypes of human immune disorders. Moreover, informed by phylogenetic considerations and inspired by improved knowledge of functional networks, new avenues emerge for innovative therapeutic strategies.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 0960-9822
    E-ISSN: 1879-0445
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: European Journal of Neuroscience, June, 2013, Vol.37(12), p.1925(6)
    Description: Byline: Jannic Boehm Keywords: Alzheimer disease; kinase; NMDA receptors; plasticity; signal transduction; synaptic Abstract Alzheimer's disease, with its two most prominent pathological factors amyloid beta and tau protein, can be described as a disease of the synapse. It therefore comes as little surprise that NMDA receptor-related synaptic dysfunction had been thought for several years to underlie the synaptic pathophysiology seen in Alzheimer's disease. In this review I will summarise recent evidence showing that the NMDA receptor links the effects of extracellular amyloid beta with intracellular tau protein. Furthermore, the antagonistic roles of Fyn and STEP in NMDA receptor regulation, synaptic plasticity and induction of synaptic depression will be discussed. Author Affiliation:
    Keywords: N-methyl-d-aspartate ; Alzheimer's Disease ; Depression (Mood disorder) ; Amyloid Beta-protein
    ISSN: 0953-816X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: Carbon, August 2012, Vol.50(9), pp.3154-3157
    Description: The basal faces of crystalline graphite do not react with molecular oxygen at ambient or moderately raised temperatures. Free radicals, however, react with exposed graphene layers of graphites and carbon materials. Such reactions can be exploited for the functionalization of carbon surfaces. Disordered carbons, e.g. activated carbons, are slowly oxidized also at room temperature when water vapor is present. Surface oxides are formed, and some CO is gradually released in this aging reaction. It was found that nitrogen doping of carbons accelerates considerably their aging and increases also their catalytic activity in other oxidation reactions with O . Evidence is presented that this activation of O molecules is due to transfer of electrons from the N-doped carbons to adsorbed O . The electrons come from nitrogen atoms bound substitutionally in the graphene layers. Superoxide ions, , are created that react with water producing hydroxyl radicals, OH
    Keywords: Chemistry
    ISSN: 0008-6223
    E-ISSN: 1873-3891
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    In: British Journal of Social Work, 2013, Vol. 43(5), pp.964-986
    Description: The article reports on research that compared the characteristics that clients and social workers, respectively, perceive as inherent in the role of social workers. The sample included 264 participants, 132 social workers employed by social service departments in a wide range of positions and one client of each of the professionals (132 clients) participated in the research. A structured questionnaire designed to examine the expectations of social workers and clients regarding the same role characteristics was administered. The findings reveal several similarities (regarding characteristics of macro intervention, use of the strengths approach and client participation), and a large number of differences, usually in the direction of higher expectations among clients (regarding characteristics of recruiting resources, advocacy, strategies of struggle or co-operation and use of the language of vulnerability). The social workers, in contrast, expected more incorporation of values in the intervention process. The article discusses the theoretical and practical implications of the findings regarding similarities and differences among social workers and clients.
    Keywords: Clients ; Professionals ; Social Worker–Client Partnership ; Social Workers' Role
    ISSN: 0045-3102
    E-ISSN: 1468-263X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages