Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Geoderma, 15 January 2018, Vol.310, pp.22-28
    Description: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoderma.2017.09.017 Byline: Johan Bouma [johan.bouma@planet.nl] Keywords Sustainable development goals; Interdisciplinarity; Transdisciplinarity; Soil functions; Ecosystem services Highlights * Perceived "elitism" of scientists and unclear goals threaten public perceptions. * Sincere and extended involvement with stakeholders can negate perceived "elitism". * SDG's present a: "point at the horizon" for guiding the soil research effort. * Soil science has central position when aiming for land-related SDG's. * Soil science has more to offer than just data. Abstract Assuming that "post-truth" and "fact-free" attitudes are only symptoms of deeper misgivings about "elite" behavior of scientists and lack of understanding of the scientific method, approaches to overcome problems should focus on improved interaction processes and on ways to better illustrate the goals of science. Regarding interaction processes, soil science has a rich history cooperating and interacting with land users that can be continued by closely involving stakeholders when defining goals and research procedures, creating joint learning and ownership, negating possible "elite" impressions. This takes a lot of time that is not available in current scientific regimes, that will have to change. Clear goals of land-related science can be derived from the UN-Sustainable Development Goals (SDG's) with a broad societal focus offering excellent opportunities for soil science to show its crucial role in reaching several of the land-related SDG's. This will require active cooperation with other sciences going beyond delivering basic data. Use of soil-water-plant-climate simulation models can facilitate interdisciplinary cooperation. Internally, the soil science community can form Communities of Scientific Practice where basic and applied scientists work in a team with knowledge brokers and educators. Soil science has a bright future because it has a central position when considering SDG's and a comprehensive systems analysis of the soil-water-plant-climate system, aiming at several SDG's at the same time, presents a promising direction for future research. Author Affiliation: Wageningen University, The Netherlands Article History: Received 20 February 2017; Revised 21 August 2017; Accepted 11 September 2017 (miscellaneous) Handling Editor: A.B. McBratney
    Keywords: Sustainable Development Goals ; Interdisciplinarity ; Transdisciplinarity ; Soil Functions ; Ecosystem Services ; Agriculture
    ISSN: 0016-7061
    E-ISSN: 1872-6259
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Geoderma, June, 2013, Vol.200-201, p.130(10)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoderma.2013.02.011 Byline: Johan Bouma, Alex McBratney Abstract: Many studies convincingly document the importance of soils when dealing with the global environmental sustainability issues of today, such as food, water and energy security, climate change, ecosystem service delivery and biodiversity protection. Even though international agencies have supported the claims by the soil science community, recent strategic environmental reports hardly mention soils. Soils need to be "re-framed", realizing that most issues are land-related. This includes introduction of the concept of "Soil Security", including elements of safety, risk and anxiety, and the metaphor of soils as a possible "keystone" connecting the various environmental issues mentioned above. In addition, there is a need for active participation in interdisciplinary research programs, while particular opportunities can be found in transdisciplinary programs actively involving stakeholders and policy makers striving for connected value development. Soil scientists can be effective "knowledge brokers" (Extension 2.0, in which participatory joint learning replaces linear knowledge transfer in traditional extension). Current developments in the policy arena, with more focus on participatory rather than top-down approaches in environmental regulations also offer particular opportunities for soil science. Effective framing does not need more diagnostic studies nor alarming declarations or conceptual action plans, but should focus on the presentation of specific case studies demonstrating the l role of soils when confronting the major environmental issues of today. Benefit/cost analyses are essential to demonstrate that good soil management often represents good business. The "Green Water" study in Kenya is presented as an example of this approach. Article History: Received 24 September 2012; Revised 19 February 2013; Accepted 22 February 2013 Article Note: (footnote) [star] Extended and modified version of a keynote address presented by the senior author, at the Soil Security Symposium at the University of Sydney, July 17, 2012.
    Keywords: Actors ; Soil Management (Agronomy) ; Soils ; Environmental Sustainability ; Ecosystems
    ISSN: 0016-7061
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Soil Science Society of America Journal, 2015, Vol.79(2), p.454(5)
    Description: The introduction of information and communication technology (ICT) has fundamentally changed the flow and role of data and information in our increasingly digital society and this also strongly affects soil science. Stakeholders become more knowledgeable and critical. This issue paper raises the question as to how the scientific community, and particularly soil science, can best deal with the implications of the ICT revolution. Problems are evident when studying sustainable development, presenting owickedo environmental problems that defy simple, straightforward solutions because many stakeholders are involved with contrasting opinions and interests, only allowing development of alternative options. A suggestion is made to establish Communities of Scientific Practice that interact with societal partners and the policy arena in a long-duration joint learning mode, promote and safeguard science quality and offer broad career perspectives for soil scientists.
    Keywords: Information Technology – Usage ; Soil Research – Technology Application
    ISSN: 0361-5995
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, 03 August 2015, Vol.61(4), pp.556-565
    Description: Soil security can only be achieved when the global soil resource is maintained and improved, requiring a reversal of current degradation processes. This demands a major effort by soil scientists in at least four directions by: (i) demonstrating the importance of soils in inter- and transdisciplinary...
    Keywords: Soil Security Dimensions ; Knowledge Brokers ; Interdisciplinarity ; Transdisciplinarity ; Land Evaluation ; Agriculture
    ISSN: 0038-0768
    E-ISSN: 1747-0765
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, April 2014, Vol.177(2), pp.111-120
    Description: The United Nations effort to define Sustainable Development Goals (SDG's), emphasizing local goals and capacity building, offers a unique opportunity for soil science to demonstrate the role it can play when focusing on these goals. Several strategic reports have presented key issues for sustainable development: food security, freshwater and energy availability, climate change and biodiversity loss are issues most frequently being listed, not soil degradation. Focusing on soil contributions towards interdisciplinary studies of these key issues, rather than emphasizing soils by themselves, is therefore bound to be more effective for the soil science profession. But this is still inadequate when studying land‐related SDG's, requiring a broader ecosystem approach that can be achieved by a direct link between soil functions and corresponding ecosystem services. Thus, the key issues are not considered separately but linked as part of a dynamic ecosystem characterization following a narrative as is demonstrated for food security, that can be well addressed by precision agriculture. As all key issues and at least five of the ten SDG's are directly land‐related, soil science can potentially play an important role in the suggested interdisciplinary studies. But in addition, the current information society with knowledgeable stakeholders requires innovative and interactive transdisciplinary scientific approaches by not only focusing on knowledge generation but also on co‐learning with stakeholders and, important, on implementation. The soil science discipline can become more effective in the transdisciplinary context by: (1) reconnecting the knowledge chain, linking tacit with scientific knowledge both ways, (2) simplifying soil terminology, (3) learning to deal with “wicked” environmental problems for which no single solutions exist but only a series of alternative options for action, balancing economic, social and environmental considerations, (4) educating “knowledge brokers”, linking science with society in land‐related issues, acting within a “Community of Scientific Practice”, and (5) modernizing soil science curricula. Transdisciplinary approaches are crucial to achieve SDG's, linking science and society. There is a need for specific results on the ground illustrating with hard data the key role soils can play in realizing SDG's.
    Keywords: Inter‐ And Transdisciplinarity ; Precision Agriculture ; Soil Nexus ; Knowledge Brokers ; Communities Of Scientific Practice
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Soil, Sept 13, 2017, Vol.3(3), p.153
    Description: The pioneering vision of Alexander von Humboldt of science and society of the early 1800s is still highly relevant today. His open mind and urge to make many measurements characterizing the interconnected web of life are crucial ingredients as we now face the worldwide challenge of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Case studies in the Philippines, Vietnam, Kenya, Niger, and Costa Rica demonstrate, in Alexander's spirit, interaction with stakeholders and attention to unique local conditions, applying modern measurement and modeling methods and allowing inter- and transdisciplinary research approaches. But relations between science and society are increasingly problematic, partly as a result of the information revolution and post-truth, fact-free thinking. Overly regulated and financially restricted scientific communities in so-called developed countries may stifle intellectual creativity. Researchers in developing countries are urged to leapfrog these problems in the spirit of Alexander von Humboldt as they further develop their scientific communities. Six suggestions to the science community are made with particular attention to soil science. (The Humboldt lecture, presented by the 2017 recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt lecture, Johan#xC2;#xA0;Bouma, can be accessed at http://client.cntv.at/egu2017/ml1.)
    Keywords: Research Scientists – Appreciation
    ISSN: 2199398X
    E-ISSN: 2199398X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Soil Science Society of America Journal, 2015, Vol.79(2), p.454
    Description: The introduction of information and communication technology (ICT) has fundamentally changed the flow and role of data and information in our increasingly digital society and this also strongly affects soil science. Stakeholders become more knowledgeable and critical. This issue paper raises the question as to how the scientific community, and particularly soil science, can best deal with the implications of the ICT revolution. Problems are evident when studying sustainable development, presenting "wicked" environmental problems that defy simple, straightforward solutions because many stakeholders are involved with contrasting opinions and interests, only allowing development of alternative options. A suggestion is made to establish Communities of Scientific Practice that interact with societal partners and the policy arena in a long-duration joint learning mode, promote and safeguard science quality and offer broad career perspectives for soil scientists.
    Keywords: Soils ; Ethics ; Information Technology ; Policy ; Practice ; Research ; Soils ; Sustainable Development;
    ISSN: Soil Science Society of America Journal
    E-ISSN: 0361-5995
    E-ISSN: 14350661
    Source: CrossRef
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: 한국토양비료학회 학술발표회 초록집, 2014, Vol.2014(6), pp.5-6
    Source: DBpia - 디비피아 (Nurimedia)
    Source: DBpia (Nurimedia)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Advances in agronomy, 2010, Vol.106, pp.143-171
    Description: Includes references ; p. 143-171.
    Keywords: Knowledge ; Issues And Policy ; Soil Science ; Decision Making ; Research ; Literature Reviews
    ISSN: 0065-2113
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Geoderma, December 2015, Vol.259-260, pp.187-195
    Description: Climate change and the development of new plant hybrids raise questions about future agricultural land use potentials that cannot be answered by expert knowledge based on past experience. This case study for maize cultivation in the Destra Sele region in southern Italy applied therefore the SWAP (Soil–Water–Atmosphere–Plant) simulation model to explore the effects of limited water availability under future climate conditions on growth of eleven maize hybrids. Five selected soil series were analyzed. Compared with optimal water availability by irrigation, results were significantly different for 80% and 60% water availability with respect to different hybrids and soil series. The soil series are distinguished by stable criteria, allowing, in principle, their use as “class pedotransfer functions” not only in space but also in time, reflecting effects of climate change by 2050. Presenting alternative land use options by simulations rather than empirical conclusions about limitations or suitabilities is attractive for land evaluation, allowing a pro-active and interactive approach by soil scientists vis-a-vis farmers, hydraulic engineers, crop breeders and policy makers.
    Keywords: Class-Pedotransferfunction ; Soil Classification ; Hydrology ; Simulation Modeling ; Global Soil Map ; Agriculture
    ISSN: 0016-7061
    E-ISSN: 1872-6259
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages