Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    In: British Medical Journal, May 25, 2002, Vol.324(7348), p.1227(2)
    Description: Postpartum urinary incontinence is an important and often overlooked form of maternal morbidity. In this issue Chiarelli and Cockburn (p 1241)1 highlight and confirm the work of other investigators who have shown that vaginal delivery induces urinary incontinence, especially the first vaginal birth Many clinical studies have attempted to discover the particular obstetric event that causes the incontinence.
    Keywords: Urinary Incontinence -- Care And Treatment ; Pregnancy Complications -- Care And Treatment
    ISSN: 1759-2151
    ISSN: 09598146
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  • 2
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: Urology, May 2016, Vol.91, pp.51-51
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2015.12.060 Byline: Linda Brubaker
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0090-4295
    E-ISSN: 1527-9995
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, November 2015, Vol.213(5), pp.644-649
    Description: Emerging evidence challenges the long-held paradigm that the healthy bladder is sterile. These discoveries may provide new opportunities to address important women’s health conditions, which include preterm labor and delivery, urinary tract infections, and common forms of urinary incontinence. Traditional tools for urinary bacterial assessment, which includes urinary dipsticks and standard urine cultures, have significant limitations that restrict the information that is available to clinicians. For example, the standard urine culture does not detect slow-growing bacteria that die in the presence of oxygen. Two new, complementary tools, however, can detect these and other organisms, which permits a more complete characterization of bacterial communities within the female bladder. Obstetrician-gynecologists should become familiar with these new approaches (expanded quantitative urine culture and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing) that can detect previously unrecognized organisms. These advances are making it possible to answer previously intractable scientific and clinical questions. Traditional nomenclature used to describe the bacterial status in the bladder is quite dated and unsuited for the emerging information about the bacterial milieu of the female urinary tract. In the context of the sterile bladder paradigm, clinicians have learned about “uropathogens,” “asymptomatic bacteriuria,” and “urinary tract infection.” Given that the lower urinary tract is not sterile, these terms should be reevaluated. Clinicians can already benefit from the emerging knowledge regarding urinary organisms that have previously gone undetected or unappreciated. For example, in some subpopulations of women with urinary symptoms, existing data suggest that the urinary bacterial community may be associated with women’s health conditions of interest. This Clinical Opinion highlights the inadequacies of the current tools for urinary bacterial assessment, describes the new assessment tools, explains the current interpretation of the resulting data, and proposes potential clinical uses and relevance. A new world is opening to our view that will give us the opportunity to better understand urinary bacteria and the bladder in which they live. This new knowledge has significant potential to improve patient care in obstetrics and gynecology.
    Keywords: 16s Rrna Sequencing ; Asymptomatic Bacteriuria ; Microbiome ; Microbiota ; Urgency Urinary Incontinence ; Urinary Tract Infection ; Urine Culture ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0002-9378
    E-ISSN: 1097-6868
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: The Lancet, 28 January 2017, Vol.389(10067), pp.334-336
    Description: In the PROSPECT study in The Lancet, Chiaris Glazener and colleagues1 have made progress in answering a clinically relevant question: using two parallel-group randomised controlled trials, the investigators assessed augmentation of transvaginal prolapse surgery with synthetic absorbable or non-absorbable mesh (type 1 monofilament macroporous polypropylene) or biological grafts (porcine acellular collagen matrix, porcine small intestinal submucosa, or bovine dermal).1 The pragmatic design involved 65 surgeons across 35 UK sites, allowing considerable generalisability with a low risk of bias.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0140-6736
    E-ISSN: 1474-547X
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  • 5
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, September 2016, Vol.215(3), pp.403-403
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2016.05.014 Byline: Jeremy Hamilton-Miller Author Affiliation: University College Medical School, London, United Kingdom Article Note: (footnote) The author reports no conflict of interest.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0002-9378
    E-ISSN: 1097-6868
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  • 6
    In: Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2011, Vol.117(6), pp.1403-1407
    Description: Research education is a requirement for obstetrics and gynecology residents. Most obstetrics and gynecology residencies struggle with barriers to efficient, effective research education and productivity for their residents. These barriers include constraints on faculty time, lack of intrinsic desire within individual residents, and lack of relevant outcome measures. We developed an efficient, novel research education curriculum that overcomes many of these barriers and provides obstetrics and gynecology residents with a structured format that maximizes the likelihood of a successful, positive research experience. Since the start of the Clinical Research Education Study Team program, the graduating resident cohorts reliably complete and present prospective research projects, including three registered randomized trials. Residency-wide support for other team research has grown dramatically. The residentsʼ work was acknowledged with several research awards, which further reinforces the positive perception of the program. The certainty of completion of their research requirement relieved our residents of the anxiety commonly reported by residents nearing graduation. The Clinical Research Education Study Team programʼs team design makes efficient use of faculty time. In addition, Clinical Research Education Study Team mentors also have incorporated junior faculty members who wish to improve their own research education skills. We offer our experience with this program in hopes that it may be of value to other programs that wish to improve their resident research education curriculum. It remains important for residents to acquire research skills before continuing into practice or fellowship. The Clinical Research Education Study Team program facilitates this education in an efficient, organized manner.
    Keywords: Biomedical Research -- Education ; Gynecology -- Education ; Obstetrics -- Education;
    ISSN: 0029-7844
    E-ISSN: 1873233X
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 06 August 2013, Vol.110(32), pp.13055-60
    Description: Wildfire activity in boreal forests is anticipated to increase dramatically, with far-reaching ecological and socioeconomic consequences. Paleorecords are indispensible for elucidating boreal fire regime dynamics under changing climate, because fire return intervals and successional cycles in these ecosystems occur over decadal to centennial timescales. We present charcoal records from 14 lakes in the Yukon Flats of interior Alaska, one of the most flammable ecoregions of the boreal forest biome, to infer causes and consequences of fire regime change over the past 10,000 y. Strong correspondence between charcoal-inferred and observational fire records shows the fidelity of sedimentary charcoal records as archives of past fire regimes. Fire frequency and area burned increased ∼6,000-3,000 y ago, probably as a result of elevated landscape flammability associated with increased Picea mariana in the regional vegetation. During the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; ∼1,000-500 cal B.P.), the period most similar to recent decades, warm and dry climatic conditions resulted in peak biomass burning, but severe fires favored less-flammable deciduous vegetation, such that fire frequency remained relatively stationary. These results suggest that boreal forests can sustain high-severity fire regimes for centuries under warm and dry conditions, with vegetation feedbacks modulating climate-fire linkages. The apparent limit to MCA burning has been surpassed by the regional fire regime of recent decades, which is characterized by exceptionally high fire frequency and biomass burning. This extreme combination suggests a transition to a unique regime of unprecedented fire activity. However, vegetation dynamics similar to feedbacks that occurred during the MCA may stabilize the fire regime, despite additional warming.
    Keywords: Arctic ; Holocene ; Climate Change ; Climate–Fire–Vegetation Interactions ; Paleoecology ; Biomass ; Fires ; Charcoal -- Analysis ; Trees -- Growth & Development
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 8
    In: The New England Journal of Medicine, 2016, Vol.374(23), pp.2295-2295
    Description: To the Editor: On the basis of a report of an investigator who was using the public data set to replicate our reported data, we identified a coding error related to the urinary stress test used in our trial. We report corrections related to our original research article (April 13, 2006, issue). 1 The overall conclusions of the trial remain supported by the corrected percentages, which are as follows: 3 months after surgery, 33.6% of the women in the Burch group and 57.4% of the women in the control group met one or more of the criteria for stress incontinence (P〈0.001). . . .
    Keywords: Datasets ; Surgery ; RTI International;
    ISSN: 0028-4793
    E-ISSN: 1533-4406
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  • 9
    In: Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2011, Vol.118(5), pp.1108-1110
    Description: OBJECTIVES:: To describe the frequency, patterns, and associations of Obstetrics & Gynecology author conflict of interest disclosures over a 2-year period. METHODS:: All original research articles published in Obstetrics & Gynecology between July 2008 and June 2010 were individually reviewed to record conflict of interest disclosures. For each article, we assessed the number of authors, the proportion of authors with disclosures, and the assigned level of evidence. For each author, we assessed the number of disclosures. For individuals who participated as authors on more than a single article during this time period and reported disclosure at least once, we also assessed the consistency of the individualʼs conflict of interest disclosures. RESULTS:: Nineteen percent of articles contained at least one disclosure with a range of one to 73 disclosure per article (median 3). Nearly one third (31%) of articles with disclosures were randomized clinical trials. Articles contributing level I evidence were somewhat more likely to have disclosures (34% compared with 16% and 17% for those reporting levels II and III evidence, P=.004). The median study duration was shorter for articles with disclosures (36 compared with 54 months, P=.003). There were 2,017 unique authors with a range one to 25 per article (median 5). Three hundred twenty-five (16%) were “repeat” authors. Disclosure inconsistencies were noted in 12% of these repeat authors (40/325). CONCLUSION:: Conflict of interest is disclosed in approximately 20% of original research articles, is more common in level I evidence papers, and appears inconsistent for 12% of repeat authors, suggesting an opportunity to improve disclosure practices. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:: III
    Keywords: Conflict of Interest–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Disclosure–Organization & Administration ; Gynecology–Organization & Administration ; Obstetrics–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Publications–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Abridged;
    ISSN: 0029-7844
    E-ISSN: 1873233X
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  • 10
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: International Urogynecology Journal, 2012, Vol.23(1), pp.3-4
    Description: Byline: Linda Brubaker (1), Bob Shull (2) Author Affiliation: (1) Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 South First Avenue, (B.103, R.1004D), Maywood, IL, 60153, USA (2) Department of OB/GYN, Scott & White Clinic, 2401 S. 31st Street, Temple, TX, 76508, USA Article History: Registration Date: 19/10/2011 Online Date: 16/11/2011 Article note: Further contributions to this debate can be found at doi: 10.1007/s00192-011-1580-3, doi: 10.1007/s00192-011-1581-2, and doi: 10.1007/s00192-011-1597-7.
    Keywords: Plastic Surgery;
    ISSN: 0937-3462
    E-ISSN: 1433-3023
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