Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Archives of Virology, Sept, 1986, Vol.88(3), p.265
    Description: Byline: Cathrien A. Bruggeman (1), W. M. H. Debie (1), G. Grauls (1), C. P. A. Boven (1) Abstract: Rat endothelial cells were productively infected with rat cytomegalovirusin vitro. A typical CMV-like cytopathic effect resulting in a lytic infection was observed. Intracytoplasmic and intranuclear virus and viral antigens were detected by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Receptors for the Fc region of IgG in the cytoplasm and on the cell membrane were observed. Infectious virus was released in the supernatant of the infected cell cultures. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands Article History: Registration Date: 01/03/2005 Received Date: 19/02/1985 Accepted Date: 29/04/1985 Article note: With 4 Figures
    Keywords: Microbiology -- Health Aspects ; Virus Diseases -- Health Aspects
    ISSN: 0304-8608
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: 2012, Vol.7(12), p.e51860
    Description: Antibiotic consumption is associated with adverse drug events (ADE) and increasing antibiotic resistance. Detailed information of antibiotic prescribing in different age categories is scarce, but necessary to develop strategies for prudent antibiotic use. The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic prescriptions of different antibiotic classes in general practice in relation to age. ; Retrospective study of 22 rural and urban general practices from the Dutch Registration Network Family Practices (RNH). Antibiotic prescribing data were extracted from the RNH database from 2000–2009. Trends over time in antibiotic prescriptions were assessed with multivariate logistic regression including interaction terms with age. Registered ADEs as a result of antibiotic prescriptions were also analyzed. ; In total 658,940 patients years were analyzed. In 11.5% (n = 75,796) of the patient years at least one antibiotic was prescribed. Antibiotic prescriptions increased for all age categories during 2000–2009, but the increase in elderly patients (〉80 years) was most prominent. In 2000 9% of the patients 〉80 years was prescribed at least one antibiotic to 22% in 2009 (〈0.001). Elderly patients had more ADEs with antibiotics and co-medication was identified as the only independent determinant for ADEs. ; The rate of antibiotic prescribing for patients who made a visit to the GP is increasing in the Netherlands with the most evident increase in the elderly patients. This may lead to more ADEs, which might lead to higher consumption of health care and more antibiotic resistance.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Public Health And Epidemiology ; Infectious Diseases ; Pharmacology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    In: Transplantation, 1999, Vol.68(11), pp.1753-1761
    Description: BACKGROUND.: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with acute and chronic allograft rejection. We have recently shown that rat CMV increases portal inflammation and bile duct destruction in a model of rat liver allograft rejection. Desferrioxamine (DFO), an iron chelator and antioxidant, has recently been demonstrated to have antiviral as well as immunomodulatory effects in vitro. We therefore investigated whether DFO inhibits (a) CMV infection and (b) graft destruction in our rat model. METHODS.: One day after liver transplantation, PVG (RT1) into BN(RT1), the rats were infected with rat CMV (RCMV, Maastricht strain; 10 plaque-forming units i.p.). The effects of 100 mg/kg body weight and 200 mg/kg body weight DFO were examined. RESULTS.: In the untreated group, the grafts were uniformly RCMV culture-positive. In the group receiving 200 mg/kg DFO, RCMV replication was effectively inhibited. Inflammatory response in the graft, and especially the number of macrophages, was significantly reduced by DFO. Portal inflammation and bile duct destruction were also significantly reduced. In the untreated group, the bile duct epithelial cells were found to be strongly positive for tumor necrosis factor-α and this expression was clearly decreased by DFO. In addition, DFO significantly inhibited vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression on sinusoidal endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS.: Our in vivo transplant study strongly supports the inhibitory effects of metal chelators on CMV infection and their possible usefulness in the treatment of CMV-induced pathogenic changes.
    Keywords: Adjuvants, Immunologic–Pharmacology ; Animals–Pharmacology ; Antiviral Agents–Metabolism ; Cell Adhesion Molecules–Physiology ; Cytomegalovirus–Immunology ; Cytomegalovirus Infections–Virology ; Deferoxamine–Pharmacology ; Graft Rejection–Complications ; Liver–Drug Effects ; Liver Transplantation–Immunology ; Nephritis–Pathology ; Rats–Virology ; Rats, Inbred Bn–Etiology ; Rats, Inbred Strains–Pathology ; Transplantation, Homologous–Metabolism ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha–Drug Effects ; Virus Replication–Drug Effects ; Adjuvants, Immunologic ; Antiviral Agents ; Cell Adhesion Molecules ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha ; Deferoxamine;
    ISSN: 0041-1337
    E-ISSN: 15346080
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: BMC Infectious Diseases, 01 October 2011, Vol.11(1), p.293
    Description: Abstract Background Over 90% of all antibiotics in Europe are prescribed in primary care. It is important that antibiotics are prescribed that are likely to be effective; however, information about antibiotic resistance in the community is incomplete. The aim of our study is to investigate the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in primary care in Europe by collecting and combining patterns of antibiotic resistance patterns and antibiotic prescription patterns in primary care. We will also evaluate the appropriateness of national antibiotic prescription guidelines in relation to resistance patterns. Methods/Design Antibiotic resistance will be studied in an opportunistic sample from the community in nine European countries. Resistance data will be collected by taking a nose swab of persons (N = 4,000 per country) visiting a primary care practice for a non-infectious disease. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae will be isolated and tested for resistance to a range of antibiotics in one central laboratory. Data on antibiotic prescriptions over the past 5 years will be extracted from the electronic medical records of General Practitioners (GPs). The results of the study will include the prevalence and resistance data of the two species and 5 years of antibiotic prescription data in nine European countries. The odds of receiving an effective antibiotic in each country will be calculated as a measure for the appropriateness of prescribing. Multilevel analysis will be used to assess the appropriateness of prescribing. Relevant treatment guidelines of the nine participating countries will be evaluated using a standardized instrument and related to the resistance patterns in that country. Discussion This study will provide valuable and unique data concerning resistance patterns and prescription behaviour in primary care in nine European countries. It will provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic treatment guidelines that take resistance patterns into account which will be useful for both clinicians and policy makers. By improving antibiotic use we can move towards controlling the resistance problem globally.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1471-2334
    E-ISSN: 1471-2334
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), January 2011, Vol.19(1), pp.220-1
    Description: Adenovirus infection has been shown to increase adiposity in chickens, mice, and nonhuman primates. Adenovirus type 36 (Ad-36) DNA was detected in adipose tissues in these animal trials. In the United States, Ad-36 significantly correlates with obesity as illustrated by an Ad-36 seroprevalence of 30% in obese individuals and 11% in nonobese individuals. We investigated the possibility of a similar correlation of Ad-36 in Dutch and Belgian persons. In total, 509 serum samples were analyzed for Ad-36 antibodies using a serum neutralization assay. In addition, PCR was used to detect adenoviral DNA in visceral adipose tissue of 31 severely obese surgical patients. Our results indicated an overall Ad-36 seroprevalence of 5.5% increasing with age. BMI of Ad-36 seropositive humans was not significantly different from seronegative humans. No adenoviral DNA could be found using PCR on visceral adipose tissue. In conclusion, this first Ad-36 study in the Netherlands and in Belgium indicates that Ad-36 does not play a role as a direct cause of BMI increase and obesity in humans in Western Europe.
    Keywords: Adenovirus Infections, Human -- Complications ; Adenoviruses, Human -- Physiology ; Obesity -- Etiology
    ISSN: 19307381
    E-ISSN: 1930-739X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: BMC Public Health, 2012, Vol.12, pp.urn:issn:1471-2458
    Keywords: Hiv ; Quality Of Care ; Services Integration ; Public Health Care ; Hospital Care ; Sti
    ISSN: 1471-2458
    Source: NARCIS (National Academic Research and Collaborations Information System)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: BMC Infectious Diseases, Oct 28, 2011, Vol.11, p.293
    Description: Background Over 90% of all antibiotics in Europe are prescribed in primary care. It is important that antibiotics are prescribed that are likely to be effective; however, information about antibiotic resistance in the community is incomplete. The aim of our study is to investigate the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in primary care in Europe by collecting and combining patterns of antibiotic resistance patterns and antibiotic prescription patterns in primary care. We will also evaluate the appropriateness of national antibiotic prescription guidelines in relation to resistance patterns. Methods/Design Antibiotic resistance will be studied in an opportunistic sample from the community in nine European countries. Resistance data will be collected by taking a nose swab of persons (N = 4,000 per country) visiting a primary care practice for a non-infectious disease. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae will be isolated and tested for resistance to a range of antibiotics in one central laboratory. Data on antibiotic prescriptions over the past 5 years will be extracted from the electronic medical records of General Practitioners (GPs). The results of the study will include the prevalence and resistance data of the two species and 5 years of antibiotic prescription data in nine European countries. The odds of receiving an effective antibiotic in each country will be calculated as a measure for the appropriateness of prescribing. Multilevel analysis will be used to assess the appropriateness of prescribing. Relevant treatment guidelines of the nine participating countries will be evaluated using a standardized instrument and related to the resistance patterns in that country. Discussion This study will provide valuable and unique data concerning resistance patterns and prescription behaviour in primary care in nine European countries. It will provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic treatment guidelines that take resistance patterns into account which will be useful for both clinicians and policy makers. By improving antibiotic use we can move towards controlling the resistance problem globally.
    Keywords: Antibiotics -- Health Aspects ; Antibiotics -- Research ; Bacterial Infections -- Diagnosis ; Bacterial Infections -- Drug Therapy ; Bacterial Infections -- Research ; Practice Guidelines (Medicine) -- Usage ; Drug Resistance -- Research
    ISSN: 1471-2334
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: BMC Infectious Diseases, Oct 28, 2011, Vol.11, p.293
    Description: Background Over 90% of all antibiotics in Europe are prescribed in primary care. It is important that antibiotics are prescribed that are likely to be effective; however, information about antibiotic resistance in the community is incomplete. The aim of our study is to investigate the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in primary care in Europe by collecting and combining patterns of antibiotic resistance patterns and antibiotic prescription patterns in primary care. We will also evaluate the appropriateness of national antibiotic prescription guidelines in relation to resistance patterns. Methods/Design Antibiotic resistance will be studied in an opportunistic sample from the community in nine European countries. Resistance data will be collected by taking a nose swab of persons (N = 4,000 per country) visiting a primary care practice for a non-infectious disease. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae will be isolated and tested for resistance to a range of antibiotics in one central laboratory. Data on antibiotic prescriptions over the past 5 years will be extracted from the electronic medical records of General Practitioners (GPs). The results of the study will include the prevalence and resistance data of the two species and 5 years of antibiotic prescription data in nine European countries. The odds of receiving an effective antibiotic in each country will be calculated as a measure for the appropriateness of prescribing. Multilevel analysis will be used to assess the appropriateness of prescribing. Relevant treatment guidelines of the nine participating countries will be evaluated using a standardized instrument and related to the resistance patterns in that country. Discussion This study will provide valuable and unique data concerning resistance patterns and prescription behaviour in primary care in nine European countries. It will provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic treatment guidelines that take resistance patterns into account which will be useful for both clinicians and policy makers. By improving antibiotic use we can move towards controlling the resistance problem globally.
    Keywords: Pneumonia ; Staphylococcus Aureus Infections ; Electronic Records ; Antibiotics ; Microbial Drug Resistance ; General Practitioners ; Family Medicine ; Prescription Writing
    ISSN: 1471-2334
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: BMC family practice, 25 October 2014, Vol.15, pp.175
    Description: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus was analysed by taking nose swabs from healthy primary care patients in nine European countries (total N = 32,032). Primary care treatment guidelines for bacterial skin infections were interpreted with respect to these antimicrobial resistance patterns. First- and second-choice recommendations were assessed and considered congruent if resistance to the antibiotic did not exceed 20%. We included primary care treatment guidelines for impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis and furuncle. Treatment recommendations in all countries were consistent: most of the first-choice recommendations were beta-lactams, both for children and adults. Antimicrobial resistance levels were low, except for penicillin (on average 73% resistance). Considerable variation in antimicrobial resistance levels was found between countries, with Sweden displaying the lowest levels and Spain the highest. In some countries resistance to penicillin and azithromycin was significantly higher in children (4-17 years) compared with adults. Most of the first- and second-choice recommendations in the treatment guidelines for skin infections were congruent with commensal S. aureus antimicrobial resistance patterns in the community, except for two recommendations for penicillin. Given the variation in antimicrobial resistance levels between countries, age groups and health care settings, national data regarding antimicrobial resistance in the community should be taken into account when updating or developing primary care treatment guidelines.
    Keywords: Drug Resistance, Bacterial ; Practice Guidelines As Topic ; Anti-Bacterial Agents -- Therapeutic Use ; Primary Health Care -- Standards ; Staphylococcal Skin Infections -- Drug Therapy
    E-ISSN: 1471-2296
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 15 April 2011, Vol.52(8), pp.982-7
    Description: Acyclovir resistance of varicella zoster virus (VZV) may arise in stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients with VZV disease and is usually a result of mutations in VZV thymidine kinase (TK), which is the target protein of acyclovir. Early detection of such mutations is necessary to enable timely therapy adaptation, for example, to foscarnet. We aimed to investigate whether TK mutations arise over time, and what sample types might be the most useful for this method. Spatially and temporally distinct samples from 3 SCT recipients with VZV disease unresponsive to acyclovir treatment were retrospectively investigated for the presence of TK mutations by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. In all 3 patients, a mutation in the VZV TK coding region was found resulting in an amino acid substitution. TK mutations were not only temporally but also spatially compartmentalized. In particular, plasma samples frequently showed wild-type TK sequences, whereas cerebrospinal fluid or skin vesicle fluid acquired on the same day contained mutant sequences. This study shows the importance of careful sampling for molecular diagnostics of acyclovir resistance in VZV disease. All affected body sites should be sampled and plasma samples may not be representative for the viral mutation status.
    Keywords: Drug Resistance, Viral ; Acyclovir -- Administration & Dosage ; Encephalitis, Varicella Zoster -- Virology ; Herpes Zoster -- Virology ; Herpesvirus 3, Human -- Drug Effects
    ISSN: 10584838
    E-ISSN: 1537-6591
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages