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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: AORN Journal, May 2012, Vol.95(5), pp.567-569
    Description: ResourcesFR1 Eur J Haematol 73 2 2004 104 108 Perioperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in Israel: a survey of academic surgical departments Ellis M.H. Elis A. FR2 J Trauma Nurse 15 1 2008 12 15 Thromboembolic prophylaxis with intermittent pneumatic compression devices in trauma patients: a false sense of security? Macatangay C. Todd S.R. Tyroch A.H. FR3 Am Surg 69 11 2003 941 945 Sequential compression devices as prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism in high-risk colorectal surgery patients: reconsidering American Society of Colorectal Surgeons parameters Ramirez J.I. Vassiliu P. Gonzalez-Ruiz C. FR4 Ann Intern Med 146 3 2007 211 222 Management of venous thromboembolism: a sytematic review for a practice guideline Segal J.B. Streiff M.B. Hofmann L.V. Thornton K. Bass E.B. FR5 AORN J 84 4 2006 642 645 Decreasing the incidence of deep vein thrombosis through the use of prophylaxis Summerfield D.L. FR6 ANZ J Surg 74 6 2004 455 459 Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis for surgical patients in an Asian hospital Tan L.H. Tan S.C. FR7 AORN J 83 6 2006 1353 1362 Implementing a research utililzation plan for prevention of deep vein thrombosis Van Wicklin S.A. Ward K.S. Cantrell S.W. FR8 Br J Nurs 16 22 2007 1408 1412 The use of antiembolic stockings: Part 1: a literature review Walker L. Lamont S.
    Keywords: Nursing
    ISSN: 0001-2092
    E-ISSN: 1878-0369
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  • 2
    In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2014, Vol.46(5S Suppl 1), pp.836-837
    Description: Burns, E., Burns, D. DeSales University, Center Valley, PA
    Keywords: Medicine ; Physical Therapy;
    ISSN: 0195-9131
    E-ISSN: 15300315
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Atmospheric Environment, December 2016, Vol.146, pp.1-4
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.10.019 Byline: Douglas A. Burns Author Affiliation: U.S. Geological Survey, 425 Jordan Road, Troy, NY, 12180, USA Article History: Received 10 October 2016
    Keywords: Engineering ; Environmental Sciences
    ISSN: 1352-2310
    E-ISSN: 1873-2844
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 2014, Vol.46(5)
    Description: The article reports on a study to evaluate and compare metabolic responses to these two exercise modes at three submaximal intensities. The results do not justify claims that the larger muscle mass utilized during rowing generates higher metabolic demand as compared to treadmill exercise; in fact the opposite may be true since rowing generated higher power output than treadmill exercise at a similar metabolic demand.
    Keywords: Metabolism – Research ; Dynamometers – Usage ; Treadmill Exercise Tests – Usage ; Rowing – Analysis
    ISSN: 0195-9131
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  • 5
    In: Ecological Applications, June 2013, Vol.23(4), pp.791-800
    Description: Describing the distribution of aquatic habitats and the health of biological communities can be costly and time‐consuming; therefore, simple, inexpensive methods to scale observations of aquatic biota to watersheds that lack data would be useful. In this study, we explored the potential of a simple “hydrogeomorphic” model to predict the effects of acid deposition on macroinvertebrate, fish, and diatom communities in 28 sub‐watersheds of the 176‐km Neversink River basin in the Catskill Mountains of New York State. The empirical model was originally developed to predict stream‐water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) using the watershed slope and drainage density. Because ANC is known to be strongly related to aquatic biological communities in the Neversink, we speculated that the model might correlate well with biotic indicators of ANC response. The hydrogeomorphic model was strongly correlated to several measures of macroinvertebrate and fish community richness and density, but less strongly correlated to diatom acid tolerance. The model was also strongly correlated to biological communities in 18 sub‐watersheds independent of the model development, with the linear correlation capturing the strongly acidic nature of small upland watersheds (〈1 km). Overall, we demonstrated the applicability of geospatial data sets and a simple hydrogeomorphic model for estimating aquatic biological communities in areas with stream‐water acidification, allowing estimates where no direct field observations are available. Similar modeling approaches have the potential to complement or refine expensive and time‐consuming measurements of aquatic biota populations and to aid in regional assessments of aquatic health.
    Keywords: Aquatic Biota ; Geomorphology ; Hydrology ; Neversink Watershed ; New York State ; Usa ; Stream Acidity ; Watershed
    ISSN: 1051-0761
    E-ISSN: 1939-5582
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Atmospheric Environment, Sept, 2012, Vol.56, p.212(10)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2012.03.067 Byline: Douglas S. Burns, Shawn D. Rottmann, Angela B.L. Plitz, Floyd L. Wiseman, William Moore, Veeradej Chynwat Abstract: An atmospheric chemistry module was developed to predict the fate of environmentally hazardous compounds discharged into the atmosphere. The computationally efficient model captures the diurnal variation within the environment and in the degradation rates of the released compounds, follows the formation of toxic degradation products, runs rapidly, and in principle can be integrated with any atmospheric transport and dispersion model. To accomplish this, a detailed atmospheric chemistry mechanism for a target toxic industrial compound (TIC) was reduced to a simple empirical effective degradation rate term (k.sub.eff). Empirically derived decay functions for k.sub.eff were developed as a function of important meteorological parameters such as solar flux, temperature, humidity, and cloud cover for various land uses and locations by statistically analyzing data generated from a detailed chemistry mechanism run over a wide range of (typical) atmospheric conditions. 1-Butene and two degradation products (propanal and nitrooxybutanone) were used as representative chemicals in the algorithm development for this proof-of-concept demonstration of the capability of the model. The quality of the developed model was evaluated via comparison with experimental chamber data and the results (decay rates) compared favorably for ethene, propene, and 1-butene (within a factor of two 75% or more of the time). Author Affiliation: ENSCO Inc., GS Division, 4849 North Wickham Road, Melbourne, FL 32940, USA Article History: Received 11 January 2012; Revised 19 March 2012; Accepted 22 March 2012
    Keywords: Clouds (Meteorology) -- Analysis ; Butylene -- Analysis ; Atmospheric Chemistry -- Analysis ; Algorithms -- Analysis
    ISSN: 1352-2310
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal Of Geophysical Research-Space Physics, 2011, Vol.116
    Description: The mobilization of mercury and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during snowmelt often accounts for a major fraction of the annual loads. We studied the role of hydrological connectivity of riparian wetlands and upland/wetland transition zones to surface waters on the mobilization of Hg and DOC in Fishing...
    Keywords: Environmental Sciences Related To Agriculture And Land-Use ; Miljö- Och Naturvårdsvetenskap
    ISSN: 0148-0227
    E-ISSN: 21562202
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 2011, Vol.261(9), pp.1510-1519
    Description: ► Basal area removal of greater than 40% may lead to negative effects on the forest ecosystem. Above 40% basal area removal stream water NO concentrations increased substantially. Increased basal area removal leads to longer periods of elevated chemical concentrations in streams. Previous studies have shown that clearcutting of northern hardwood forests mobilizes base cations, inorganic monomeric aluminum (Al ), and nitrate (NO -N) from soils to surface waters, but the effects of partial harvests on NO -N have been less frequently studied. In this study we describe the effects of a series of partial harvests of varying proportions of basal area removal (22%, 28% and 68%) on Al , calcium (Ca ), and NO -N concentrations in soil extracts, soil water, and surface water in the Catskill Mountains of New York, USA. Increases in NO -N concentrations relative to pre-harvest values were observed within a few months after harvest in soils, soil water, and stream water for all three harvests. Increases in Al and Ca concentrations were also evident in soil water and stream water over the same time period for all three harvests. The increases in Al , Ca , and NO -N concentrations in the 68% harvest were statistically significant as measured by comparing the 18-month pre-harvest period with the 18-month post-harvest period, with fewer significant responses in the two harvests of lowest intensity. All three solutes returned to pre-harvest concentrations in soil water and stream water in the two lowest intensity harvests in 2–3 years compared to a full 3 years in the 68% harvest. When the results of this study were combined with those of a previous nearby clearcut and 40% harvest, the post-harvest increases in NO -N concentrations in stream water and soil water suggest a harvesting level above which the relation between concentration and harvest intensity changes; there was a greater change in concentration per unit change in harvest intensity when basal area removal was greater than 40%. These results indicate that the deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems previously demonstrated for intensive harvests in northern hardwood forests of northeastern North America that receive high levels of atmospheric N deposition can be greatly diminished as harvesting intensity decreases below 40–68%. These results await confirmation through additional incremental forest harvest studies at other locations throughout the world that receive high levels of atmospheric N deposition.
    Keywords: Stream Water Quality ; Nitrate ; Aluminum ; Calcium ; Partial Harvest ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Science of the Total Environment, 15 August 2016, Vol.562, pp.35-46
    Description: Acidic deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion has degraded aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in North America for over four decades. The only management option other than emissions reductions for combating the effects of acidic deposition has been the application of lime to neutralize acidity after it has been deposited on the landscape. For this reason, liming has been a part of acid rain science from the beginning. However, continued declines in acidic deposition have led to partial recovery of surface water chemistry, and the start of soil recovery. Liming is therefore no longer needed to prevent further damage, so the question becomes whether liming would be useful for accelerating recovery of systems where improvement has lagged. As more is learned about recovering ecosystems, it has become clear that recovery rates vary with watershed characteristics and among ecosystem components. Lakes appear to show the strongest recovery, but recovery in streams is sluggish and recovery of soils appears to be in the early stages. The method in which lime is applied is therefore critical in achieving the goal of accelerated recovery. Application of lime to a watershed provides the advantage of increasing Ca availability and reducing or preventing mobilization of toxic Al, an outcome that is beneficial to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the goal should not be complete neutralization of soil acidity, which is naturally produced. Liming of naturally acidic areas such as wetlands should also be avoided to prevent damage to indigenous species that rely on an acidic environment. Liming is no longer needed to prevent further damage from acidic deposition. However, recovery of calcium-depleted ecosystems is sluggish and the conditions of full recovery remain uncertain. Whole-watershed liming may accelerate recovery in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems where recovery is being impeded by low availability of calcium.
    Keywords: Calcium Depletion ; Recovery From Acidification ; Watershed Liming ; Aluminum Toxicity ; Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    E-ISSN: 1879-1026
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, Jan, 2013, Vol.172, p.42(11)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2012.08.008 Byline: Paul M. Bradley (a), Celeste A. Journey (a), Mark E. Brigham (b), Douglas A. Burns (c), Daniel T. Button (d), Karen Riva-Murray (c) Abstract: To assess inter-comparability of fluvial mercury (Hg) observations at substantially different scales, Hg concentrations, yields, and bivariate-relations were evaluated at nested-basin locations in the Edisto River, South Carolina and Hudson River, New York. Differences between scales were observed for filtered methylmercury (FMeHg) in the Edisto (attributed to wetland coverage differences) but not in the Hudson. Total mercury (THg) concentrations and bivariate-relationships did not vary substantially with scale in either basin. Combining results of this and a previously published multi-basin study, fish Hg correlated strongly with sampled water FMeHg concentration (I = 0.78; p = 0.003) and annual FMeHg basin yield (I = 0.66; p = 0.026). Improved correlation (I = 0.88; p 〈 0.0001) was achieved with time-weighted mean annual FMeHg concentrations estimated from basin-specific LOADEST models and daily streamflow. Results suggest reasonable scalability and inter-comparability for different basin sizes if wetland area or related MeHg-source-area metrics are considered. Author Affiliation: (a) U.S. Geological Survey, 720 Gracern Rd, Columbia, SC 29210, USA (b) U.S. Geological Survey, 2280 Woodale Dr, Mounds View, MN 55112, USA (c) U.S. Geological Survey, 425 Jordan Rd, Troy, NY 12180, USA (d) U.S. Geological Survey, 6480 Doubletree Ave., Columbus, OH 43229, USA Article History: Received 15 February 2012; Revised 16 August 2012; Accepted 17 August 2012
    Keywords: Geomorphology -- Analysis ; Geomorphology -- Environmental Aspects ; Wetlands -- Analysis ; Wetlands -- Environmental Aspects ; Methylmercury Compounds -- Analysis ; Methylmercury Compounds -- Environmental Aspects ; Streamflow -- Analysis ; Streamflow -- Environmental Aspects ; Basins (Geology) -- Analysis ; Basins (Geology) -- Environmental Aspects
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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