Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
Person/Organisation
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: PM&R, September 2016, Vol.8(9), pp.S152-S152
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2016.07.021 Byline: Kelly Cho Author Affiliation: Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare, Minneapolis, MN, United States
    Keywords: Physical Therapy
    ISSN: 1934-1482
    E-ISSN: 1934-1563
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of Pediatrics, April 2013, Vol.162(4), pp.713-718.e2
    Description: To investigate whether prenatal exposure to nicotine has an impact on several reading skill outcomes in school age children. Using a longitudinal sample of 5119 school age children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, this study investigated specific reading skill outcomes in the area of speed, fluency, accuracy, spelling, and comprehension in relation to prenatal nicotine exposure, after adjusting for potential mediators and confounders. Prenatal nicotine exposure was divided into 3 categories: high (〉17 mg per day), low (≤17 mg per day), and no exposure. We found that prenatal nicotine exposure was associated with increased risk of underperformance in specific reading skill outcomes after adjusting for potential mediators and confounders ( = .006). The effect of poor performance in decoding single words was most pronounced among children with prenatal exposure to high levels of nicotine in conjunction with a phonological deficit. Overall, the results showed that maternal smoking has moderate to large associations with delayed or decreased reading skills of children in the Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. High prenatal nicotine exposure has a negative association with reading performance in school age children. In addition, modeling showed that environmental factors significantly moderated the interaction between prenatal nicotine exposure and reading skill outcomes.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0022-3476
    E-ISSN: 1097-6833
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Marketing Research, 1 December 2012, Vol.49(6), pp.872-881
    Description: Understanding how emotions can affect pleasure has important implications both for people and for firms' communication strategies. Prior research has shown that experienced pleasure often assimilates to the valence of one's active emotions, such that negative emotions decrease pleasure. In contrast, the authors demonstrate that the activation of guilt, a negative emotion, enhances the pleasure experienced from hedonic consumption. The authors show that this effect occurs because of a cognitive association between guilt and pleasure, such that activating guilt can automatically activate cognitions related to pleasure. Furthermore, the authors show that this pattern of results is unique to guilt and cannot be explained by a contrast effect that generalizes to other negative emotions. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings for marketing and consumption behavior.
    Keywords: Behavioral sciences -- Psychology -- Cognitive psychology ; Behavioral sciences -- Psychology -- Cognitive psychology ; Social sciences -- Food studies -- Food consumption ; Behavioral sciences -- Psychology -- Cognitive psychology ; Behavioral sciences -- Psychology -- Cognitive psychology ; Applied sciences -- Food science -- Foodstuffs ; Business -- Business administration -- Corporate communications ; Applied sciences -- Research methods -- Observational research ; Behavioral sciences -- Psychology -- Cognitive psychology ; Applied sciences -- Technology -- Communications technology
    ISSN: 00222437
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(1)
    Description: Substance dependence or addiction is a complex environmental and genetic disorder that results in serious health and socio-economic consequences. Multiple substance dependence categories together, rather than any one individual addiction outcome, may explain the genetic variability of such disorder. In our study, we defined a composite substance dependence phenotype derived from six individual diagnoses: addiction to nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, opiates or other drugs as a whole. Using data from several genomewide case-control studies, we identified a strong (Odds ratio  = 1.77) and significant (p-value = 7E-8) association signal with a novel gene, PBX/knotted 1 homeobox 2 (PKNOX2), on chromosome 11 with the composite phenotype in European-origin women. The association signal is not as significant when individual outcomes for addiction are considered, or in males or African-origin population. Our findings underscore the importance of considering multiple addiction types and the importance of considering population and gender stratification when analyzing data with heterogeneous population.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Mathematics ; Medicine
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 15 April 2017, Vol.90, pp.46-52
    Description: Using a dual DNA aptamer (CEA aptamer linked to hemin aptamer), capable of rapidly capturing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and hemin, an all-in-one dual-aptasensor with 1,1′-oxalyldiimidazole (ODI) chemiluminescence detection was developed for the early diagnosis of human cancer. CEA and hemin competitively bound with the dual DNA aptamer while the mixture in a detection cell was incubated for 30 min at room temperature. When Amplex Red and H O were added in the detection cell after the incubation, the yield of resorufin formed from the reaction Amplex Red and H O depended on the concentration of HRP-mimicking G-quardruplex DNAzyme formed from the binding interaction between hemin and the dual DNA aptamer. Bright red light was observed with the addition of ODI and H O in the detection cell containing resorufin. Relative CL intensity of all-in-one dual-aptasensor, operated with the competitive reaction of CEA and hemin in the presence of the dual aptamer, was exponentially decreased with the increase of CEA concentration in human serum. The limit of detection (LOD=3σ) of the all-in-one dual-aptasensor which operated with excellent accuracy, precision, and reproducibility was as low as 0.58 ng/ml. The good correlation between the easy to use all-in-one dual-aptasensor and conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), operated with time consuming procedures (e.g., long incubations and multiple washings), indicates that the rapid all-in-one dual-aptasensor can be applied as a novel clinical tool for the early diagnosis of breast cancer.
    Keywords: Carcinoembryonic Antigen (Cea) ; Dual Aptamer ; G-Quadruplex Dnazyme ; Dual-Aptasensor ; Aptasensor ; 1,1′-Oxalyldiimidazole Chemiluminescence (Odi-Cl) ; Engineering ; Biology
    ISSN: 0956-5663
    E-ISSN: 1873-4235
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Gupta, Kalpana, Richard A. Martinello, Melissa Young, Judith Strymish, Kelly Cho, and Elizabeth Lawler. 2013. MRSA nasal carriage patterns and the subsequent risk of conversion between patterns, infection, and death. PLoS ONE 8(1): e53674.
    Description: Background: Patterns of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage over time and across the continuum of care settings are poorly characterized. Knowledge of prevalence rates and outcomes associated with MRSA nasal carriage patterns could help direct infection prevention strategies. The VA integrated health-care system and active surveillance program provides an opportunity to delineate nasal carriage patterns and associated outcomes of death, infection, and conversion in carriage. Methods/Findings: We conducted a retrospective cohort study including all patients admitted to 5 acute care VA hospitals between 2008–2010 who had nasal MRSA PCR testing within 48 hours of admission and repeat testing within 30 days. The PCR results were used to define a baseline nasal carriage pattern of never, intermittently, or always colonized at 30 days from admission. Follow-up was up to two years and included acute, long-term, and outpatient care visits. Among 18,038 patients, 91.1%, 4.4%, and 4.6% were never, intermittently, or always colonized at the 30-day baseline. Compared to non-colonized patients, those who were persistently colonized had an increased risk of death (HR 2.58; 95% CI 2.18;3.05) and MRSA infection (HR 10.89; 95% CI 8.6;13.7). Being in the non-colonized group at 30 days had a predictive value of 87% for being non-colonized at 1 year. Conversion to MRSA colonized at 6 months occurred in 11.8% of initially non-colonized patients. Age 〉70 years, long-term care, antibiotic exposure, and diabetes identified 〉95% of converters. Conclusions: The vast majority of patients are not nasally colonized with MRSA at 30 days from acute hospital admission. Conversion from non-carriage is infrequent and can be risk-stratified. A positive carriage pattern is strongly associated with infection and death. Active surveillance programs in the year following carriage pattern designation could be tailored to focus on non-colonized patients who are at high risk for conversion, reducing universal screening burden.
    Keywords: Biology ; Microbiology ; Population Biology ; Epidemiology ; Disease Informatics ; Infectious Disease Epidemiology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Bacterial Diseases ; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus ; Staph Infections ; Staphylococcal Infection ; Infectious Disease Control ; Non-Clinical Medicine ; Health Care Policy ; Disease Registries ; Public Health
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    In: Neurology, 2017, Vol.89(18), pp.1877-1885
    Description: OBJECTIVE:: To determine whether metformin is associated with a lower incidence of dementia than sulfonylureas. METHODS:: This was a retrospective cohort study of US veterans ≥65 years of age with type 2 diabetes who were new users of metformin or a sulfonylurea and had no dementia. Follow-up began after 2 years of therapy. To account for confounding by indication, we developed a propensity score (PS) and used inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) methods. Cox proportional hazards models estimated the hazard ratio (HR) of incident dementia. RESULTS:: We identified 17,200 new users of metformin and 11,440 new users of sulfonylureas. Mean age was 73.5 years and mean HbA1c was 6.8%. Over an average follow-up of 5 years, 4,906 cases of dementia were diagnosed. Due to effect modification by age, all analyses were conducted using a piecewise model for age. Crude hazard ratio [HR] for any dementia in metformin vs sulfonylurea users was 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61–0.73) and 0.78 (95% CI 0.72–0.83) for those 〈75 years of age and ≥75 years of age, respectively. After PS IPTW adjustment, results remained significant in veterans 〈75 years of age (HR 0.89; 95% CI 0.79–0.99), but not for those ≥75 years of age (HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.87–1.05). A lower risk of dementia was also seen in the subset of younger veterans who had HbA1C values ≥7% (HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.63–0.91), had good renal function (HR 0.86; 95% CI 0.76–0.97), and were white (HR 0.87; 95% CI 0.77–0.99). CONCLUSIONS:: After accounting for confounding by indication, metformin was associated with a lower risk of subsequent dementia than sulfonylurea use in veterans 〈75 years of age. Further work is needed to identify which patients may benefit from metformin for the prevention of dementia.
    Keywords: Veterans ; Dementia -- Chemically Induced ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 -- Drug Therapy ; Hypoglycemic Agents -- Adverse Effects ; Metformin -- Adverse Effects ; Sulfonylurea Compounds -- Adverse Effects;
    ISSN: 0028-3878
    E-ISSN: 1526632X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Circulation, March 7, 2017, Vol.135(10), p.A39(1)
    Keywords: Type 2 Diabetes -- Risk Factors ; Glycemic Index -- Analysis ; Epidemiology -- Analysis ; Statins -- Dosage And Administration
    ISSN: 0009-7322
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 05 April 2016, Vol.67(13), pp.1476-1476
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0735-1097(16)31477-2 Byline: Yash Rameshbhai Patel, Jeremy Robbins, Katherine Kurgansky, Taraka Gadiraju, Tasnim Imran, Kelly Cho, David Gagnon, J. Michael Gaziano, Jacob Joseph Author Affiliation: VA Boston Healthcare Center, Boston, MA, USA Article Note: (footnote) Poster Contributions Poster Area, South Hall A1 Sunday, April 03, 2016, 3:45 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Session Title: Novel Approaches to HFpEF and Other Common Dilemmas Abstract Category: 26. Heart Failure and Cardiomyopathies: Clinical Presentation Number: 1217-089
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0735-1097
    E-ISSN: 1558-3597
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Eicher, John D., Natalie R. Powers, Kelly Cho, Laura L. Miller, Kathryn L. Mueller, Susan M. Ring, J. Bruce Tomblin, and Jeffrey R. Gruen. 2013. Associations of prenatal nicotine exposure and the dopamine related genes ANKK1 and DRD2 to verbal language. PLoS ONE 8(5): e63762.
    Description: Language impairment (LI) and reading disability (RD) are common pediatric neurobehavioral disorders that frequently co-occur, suggesting they share etiological determinants. Recently, our group identified prenatal nicotine exposure as a factor for RD and poor reading performance. Using smoking questionnaire and language data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, we first determined if this risk could be expanded to other communication disorders by evaluating whether prenatal nicotine exposure increases risk for LI and poor performance on language tasks. Prenatal nicotine exposure increased LI risk (OR = 1.60; p = 0.0305) in a dose-response fashion with low (OR = 1.25; p = 0.1202) and high (OR = 3.84; p = 0.0002) exposures. Next, hypothesizing that the effects of prenatal nicotine may also implicate genes that function in nicotine related pathways, we determined whether known nicotine dependence (ND) genes associate with performance on language tasks. We assessed the association of 33 variants previously implicated in ND with LI and language abilities, finding association between ANKK1/DRD2 and performance on language tasks (p≤0.0003). The associations of markers within ANKK1 were replicated in a separate LI case-control cohort (p〈0.05). Our results show that smoking during pregnancy increases the risk for LI and poor performance on language tasks and that ANKK1/DRD2 contributes to language performance. More precisely, these findings suggest that prenatal environmental factors influence in utero development of neural circuits vital to language. Our association of ANKK1/DRD2 further implicates the role of nicotine-related pathways and dopamine signaling in language processing, particularly in comprehension and phonological memory.
    Keywords: Biology ; Genetics ; Heredity ; Complex Traits ; Human Genetics ; Genetic Association Studies ; Neuroscience ; Behavioral Neuroscience ; Neuropsychology ; Medicine ; Clinical Research Design ; Survey Research ; Neurology ; Developmental And Pediatric Neurology ; Pediatrics
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages