Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy, 01 August 2012, Vol.10(8), pp.935-946
    Description: Invasive candidiasis is a common problem in premature infants that leads to high morbidity and mortality. Although Candida albicans has historically been the most prominent species involved in these infections and has therefore been the subject of the most study, Candida parapsilosis is increasing...
    Keywords: Antifungal Prophylaxis ; Antifungal Resistance ; Candida Albicans ; Candida Parapsilosis ; Echinocandins ; Fluconazole ; Host Defense ; Lactoferrin ; Virulence Factors ; Medicine
    ISSN: 1478-7210
    E-ISSN: 1744-8336
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of Pediatrics, 12/2018, Vol.203, C, pp.76-85.e8
    Description: Byline: Holly M. Frost, MD [holly.frost2@dhha.org] (1,2,3), Huong Q. McLean, PhD (3), Brian D.W. Chow, MD (4,5) Keywords antimicrobial stewardship; outpatient; pediatrics; respiratory infection; specialty Objective To evaluate variation in antibiotic prescribing between pediatric and nonpediatric providers for common upper respiratory illnesses. Study design Patient encounters for children aged 〈18 years from a regional health care system were identified. Electronic medical records from 2011 to 2016 were extracted for diagnoses of upper respiratory infection, pharyngitis, acute otitis media, and sinusitis. Encounters with competing medical diagnoses, recent hospitalization, and antibiotic prescriptions within 30 days were excluded. Adherence to antibiotic guidelines was assessed by provider training (pediatric, nonpediatric physicians, and advance practice providers). Additional factors assessed were calendar year, and patient's age, sex, insurance status, and number of sick visits in the prior year. Results Across 6 years, 141 361 visits were examined: 43 914 for upper respiratory infection, 43 701 for pharyngitis, 43 925 for acute otitis media, and 9821 for sinusitis. Pediatricians were more likely than Advanced practice providers (APP) and nonpediatric providers to have guideline-concordant prescribing for pharyngitis (pediatricians, 66.7% [95% CI, 54.5-77.0]; nonpediatricians, 49.1% [95% CI, 36.3-62.0], APPs, 52.2% [95% CI, 39.4-64.7]; P 〈 .0001) and sinusitis (pediatricians, 70.8% [95% CI, 53.8-83.4], nonpediatricians, 63.3% [95% CI, 46.8-77.2], APPs, 62.1% [95% CI, 45.1-76.5]; P = .48) and to withhold antibiotics for upper respiratory infection than APPs and nonpediatric providers (pediatricians, 86.6% [95% CI, 81.2-90.6], nonpediatricians, 80.8% [95% CI, 73.0-86.8], APPs, 76.8% [95% CI, 68.4-83.5]; P 〈 .0001). Pediatricians were less likely to prescribe antibiotics for pharyngitis without a positive test for group A Streptococcus than APPs and nonpediatric providers (pediatricians, 15.1% [95% CI, 10.4-21.6], nonpediatricians, 29.4% [95% CI, 20.8-39.6], APPs, 27.2% [95% CI, 19.3-36.9]; P 〈 .0001). First-line antibiotic prescribing for acute otitis media did not differ between provider specialties. A trend toward more guideline-concordant prescribing was seen for pharyngitis and sinusitis over the study period. Conclusions Pediatricians were more likely to adhere to guidelines for management of pediatric acute respiratory infections. Pediatric antibiotic stewardship efforts should also target nonpediatricians. Abbreviations AOM, Acute otitis media; APP, Advanced practice provider; ARI, Acute respiratory illness; ASP, Antimicrobial stewardship program; GAS, Group A Streptococcus; ICD, International Classification of Diseases; MCHS, Marshfield Clinic Health System; URI, Upper respiratory infectionw Author Affiliation: (1) University of Colorado, Department of Pediatrics, Aurora, CO (2) Denver Health and Hospital Authority, Department of Pediatrics, Denver, CO (3) Marshfield Clinic Research Institute, Marshfield, WI (4) Tufts Medical Center, Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Boston, MA (5) Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA * Reprint requests: Holly M. Frost, MD, 777 Bannock St, Denver, CO. Article History: Received 9 May 2018; Revised 11 June 2018; Accepted 11 July 2018 (footnote) The authors declare no conflicts of interest. (footnote)* Previously associated with Marshfield Clinic Health System, Marshfield, Wisconsin.
    Keywords: Antibiotics ; Medical Research ; Respiratory Tract Diseases ; Medical Records;
    ISSN: 00223476
    E-ISSN: 10976833
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Clinical Virology, 2/2010, Vol.47(2), pp.143-147
    Description: Background The human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly recognized parvovirus associated with respiratory and gastrointestinal disease. Recently, two new members of the parvovirus family have been recognized, HBoV2 and HBoV3. Objectives Here we investigate stool and respiratory samples for the presence of HBoV, HBoV2 and HBoV3. Study design Stool samples collected from 12/1/2007 to 3/31/2008 were screened by PCR for the presence of HBoV, HBoV2, and HBoV3. Extracted DNA from respiratory specimens archived between 10/17/2005 and 3/29/2006 were screened by PCR for HBoV2 and HBoV3. Medical records for all bocavirus positive patients were reviewed. Results Of 479 stool samples screened, 328 (68.5%) were from adults, and 151 (31.5%) were from children. Sixteen (3.4%) patients were positive for the presence of a bocavirus, including 10 (2.1%) HBoV and 6 (1.3%) HBoV2. No HBoV3 was detected in stool samples. Frequency of HBoV and HBoV2 in stool samples from children was 3.3% and 0.7%, and from adults was 1.5% and 1.5% respectively. Clinical findings in patients with HBoV and HBoV2 in stool include diarrhea (50% and 83.3%), abdominal pain (40%, 33.3%), and cough (10%, 50%). Of 868 respiratory samples screened, none were positive for either HBoV2 or HBoV3. Conclusions The newly recognized parvovirus HBoV2 circulates in the United States. Patients with bocaviruses in stool have evidence of gastrointestinal illness. HBoV2 was not detected in respiratory samples. HBoV3 was not detected in either stool or respiratory samples.
    Keywords: Bocavirus ; Hbov ; Viral Gastroenteritis ; Gastrointestinal Disease ; Gastroenteritis;
    ISSN: 13866532
    E-ISSN: 18735967
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, 08/2017, Vol.61(2), pp.252-258
    Description: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.02.019 Byline: Huong Q. McLean, Ph.D., M.P.H. [Mclean.huong@marshfieldclinic.org] (a,*), Jeffrey J. VanWormer, Ph.D. (a), Brian D.W. Chow, M.D. (a,b), Becky Birchmeier, R.N., M.S. (c), Elizabeth Vickers, M.P.H. (a), Edna DeVries, M.D. (b), James Meyer, M.D. (b), Jeffrey Moore, M.D. (d), Michael M. McNeil, M.D., M.P.H. (e), Shannon Stokley, Dr.P.H. (f), Julianne Gee, M.P.H. (e), Edward A. Belongia, M.D. (a) Keywords HPV; Human papillomavirus vaccines; Health care providers; Intervention; Quality improvement; Health system Abstract Purpose Acceptance and coverage of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in the United States has been suboptimal. We implemented a multifaceted provider and staff intervention over a 1-year period to promote HPV vaccination in a regional health care system. Methods The intervention was conducted in nine clinical departments from February 2015 to March 2016; 34 other departments served as controls. The intervention included in-person provider and staff education, quarterly feedback of vaccine coverage, and system-wide changes to patient reminder and recall notifications. Change in first-dose HPV vaccine coverage and series completion were estimated among 11- to 12-year-olds using generalized estimating equations adjusted for age and sex. Results HPV vaccine coverage in the intervention departments increased from 41% to 59%, and the increase was significantly greater than that seen in the control departments (32%--45%, p = .0002). The largest increase occurred in the quarter after completion of the provider and staff education and a patient reminder and recall postcard mailing (p = .004). Series completion also increased significantly system wide among adolescents aged 11--12 years following mailing of HPV vaccine reminder letters to parents of adolescents aged 12 years rather than 16 years. Conclusions HPV vaccine uptake can be improved through a multifaceted approach that includes provider and staff education and patient reminder/recall. System-level change to optimize reminder and recall notices can have substantial impact on HPV vaccine utilization. Author Affiliation: (a) Center for Clinical Epidemiology & Population Health, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute, Marshfield, Wisconsin (b) Pediatrics, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wisconsin (c) Institute for Quality Innovation & Patient Safety, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wisconsin (d) Family Medicine, Marshfield Clinic, Merrill, Wisconsin (e) Immunization Safety Office, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia (f) Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia * Address correspondence to: Huong Q. McLean, Ph.D., M.P.H., Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute, 1000 North Oak Avenue (ML2), Marshfield, WI 54449. Article History: Received 24 October 2016; Accepted 14 February 2017 (footnote) Conflicts of Interest: The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose. (footnote) Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    Keywords: Papillomavirus ; Medical Care Quality ; Vaccines ; Health Care Reform ; Papillomavirus Infections ; Health Care Industry ; Medical Research ; Vaccination;
    ISSN: 1054139X
    E-ISSN: 18791972
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Human Lactation, 02/2016, Vol.32(1), pp.168-173
    Description: Background: Colonization increases risk for invasive candidiasis in neonates. Breast milk host defense proteins may affect yeast colonization of infants. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate breast milk host defense proteins relative to yeast colonization in infants. Methods: Infants admitted for longer than 72 hours to the neonatal intensive care unit at Women & Infants Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island, were eligible. After consent, expressed breast milk and swabs from oral, rectal, and inguinal sites from infants were cultured weekly for 12 weeks, or until discharge, transfer, or death. Breast milk was tested for levels of human lactoferrin, lysozyme, apolipoprotein J, mucin-1, dermcidin, and soluble CD14 using commercial ELISA. Concentrations of these components were compared in breast milk received by infants who were colonized or not colonized with yeast. Results: From an original cohort of 130, 61 infants had samples available for this subanalysis. A convenience sample of stored breast milk was analyzed. Median lactoferrin, apolipoprotein J, and mucin-1 did not differ between colonized and uncolonized groups. Soluble CD14 was higher in the surface-colonized group (1.8 mu g/mL, n = 12) compared with the surface-uncolonized group (1.6 mu g/mL, n = 12, P = .02). Median lysozyme levels were higher in the surface-uncolonized group (483.0 ng/mL, n = 12) versus the surface-colonized group (298.3 ng/mL, n = 12, P = .04). Median dermcidin levels were higher in the surface-uncolonized group (19.4 ng/mL, n = 12) versus the surface-colonized group (8.7 ng/mL, n = 12, P = .04). Conclusion: This study shows an association between colonization with Candida in neonates and lower levels of lysozyme and dermcidin in received breast milk. Further study is needed to confirm these findings.
    Keywords: Lysozyme ; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay ; Rectum ; Apolipoproteins ; Candidiasis ; Breast Milk ; Cd14 Antigen ; Lactation ; Colonization ; Intensive Care Units ; Lactoferrin ; Neonates ; Infants ; Hospitals ; Candida ; Human Diseases ; Breastfeeding ; Candida ; Colonization ; Neonatal;
    ISSN: 0890-3344
    E-ISSN: 1552-5732
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine, 12/2009, Vol.29(4), pp.695-713
    Description: Respiratory tract infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly recognized human parvovirus first reported in 2005. Since its discovery, this virus has been associated with upper and lower respiratory tract disease and gastroenteritis worldwide. This article is a comprehensive review of what is known about HBoV. It includes an evaluation of diagnostic modalities, symptoms occurring in affected patients, and a discussion as to whether HBoV is responsible for identified clinical manifestations. The article reviews the incidence and effect of coinfection and updates on related members (HBoV-2 and HBoV-3) recently reported. Understanding of respiratory viruses such as HBoV remains vitally important to the health of adult and pediatric patients.
    Keywords: Human Bocavirus ; Human Bocavirus 2 ; Human Bocavirus 3 ; Viral Infection ; Viral Gastroenteritis ; Pneumonia;
    ISSN: 02722712
    E-ISSN: 15579832
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Clinical Virology, Nov, 2008, Vol.43(3), p.302(5)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2008.07.009 Byline: Brian D.W. Chow (a)(b)(d), Yung T. Huang (a)(c), Frank P. Esper (a)(b) Keywords: Human bocavirus; Respiratory infections; COPD; Asthma; Nosocomial infection Abstract: Viral respiratory illness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The human bocavirus (HBoV) is a recently recognized parvovirus isolated from human respiratory secretions. Author Affiliation: (a) Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, United States (b) Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, United States (c) Department of Pathology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, United States (d) Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, United States Article History: Received 3 April 2008; Revised 22 July 2008; Accepted 23 July 2008
    Keywords: Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease ; Cross Infection
    ISSN: 1386-6532
    E-ISSN: 18735967
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages