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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Neuroscience, 5/2012, Vol.210, C, pp.168-178
    Description: Although exposure to social stress leads to increased depression-like and anxiety-like behavior, some individuals are more vulnerable than others to these stress-induced changes in behavior. Prior social experience is one factor that can modulate how individuals respond to stressful events. In this study, we investigated whether experience-dependent resistance to the behavioral consequences of social defeat was associated with a specific pattern of neural activation. We paired weight-matched male Syrian hamsters in daily aggressive encounters for 2 weeks, during which they formed a stable dominance relationship. We also included control animals that were exposed to an empty cage each day for 2 weeks. Twenty-four hours after the final pairing or empty cage exposure, half of the subjects were socially defeated in 3, 5-min encounters, whereas the others were not socially defeated. Twenty-four hours after social defeat, animals were tested for conditioned defeat in a 5-min social interaction test with a non-aggressive intruder. We collected brains after social defeat and processed the tissue for c-Fos immunoreactivity. We found that dominants were more likely than subordinates to counter-attack the resident aggressor during social defeat, and they showed less submissive and defensive behavior at conditioned defeat testing compared with subordinates. Also, social status was associated with distinct patterns of defeat-induced neural activation in select brain regions, including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus, and lateral septum. Our results indicate that social status is an important form of prior experience that predicts both initial coping style and the degree of resistance to social defeat. Further, the differences in defeat-induced neural activation suggest possible brain regions that may control resistance to conditioned defeat in dominant individuals. Highlights▶Dominant individuals show reduced conditioned defeat compared with subordinates. ▶Social status leads to modest differences in baseline neural activation. ▶Social status produces distinct patterns of defeat-induced neural activation. ▶Defeat-induced neural activation in the prefrontal cortex is linked to resilience.
    Keywords: Social Defeat ; Dominance ; Stress ; Resilience ; Coping ; Conditioned Defeat ; Ah ; Anova ; Bla ; Bnst ; Dls ; Dmea ; Gs ; Il ; La ; Mpoa ; PBS ; Pl ; Pvn ; Vls ; Vmea ; Vmhl ; Vmpfc;
    ISSN: 03064522
    E-ISSN: 18737544
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Thin Solid Films, 08/2015, Vol.589, C, pp.369-375
    Description: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tsf.2015.05.036 Byline: Y.G. Fedorenko (a,1), M.A. Hughes (a), J.L. Colaux (a), C. Jeynes (a), R.M. Gwilliam (a), K. Homewood (a), B. Gholipour (b), J. Yao (b), D.W. Hewak (b), T.-H. Lee (c), S.R. Elliott (c), R.J. Curry (a) Keywords Amorphous chalcogenide; Doping; Ion implantation Highlights * Electron conductivity is observed in Bi-implanted GeTe films. * Higher conductivity in Bi-implanted films stems from increased density of electrically active defects. * Bi implanted in amorphous chalcogenides may promote formation of a more chemically ordered alloy. Abstract The impact of Bi implantation on the conductivity and the thermopower of GeTe, Ge--Sb--Te, and Ga--La--S films is investigated. The enhanced conductivity appears to be notably sensitive to a dose of an implant. Incorporation of Bi in amorphous chalcogenide films at doses up to 1 x 10.sup.15 cm.sup.- 2 is seen not to change the majority carrier type and activation energy for the conduction process. Higher implantation doses may reverse the majority carrier type in the studied films. Electron conductivity was observed in GeTe films implanted with Bi at a dose of 2 x 10.sup.16 cm.sup.- 2. These studies indicate that native coordination defects present in amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors can be deactivated by means of ion implantation. A substantial density of implantation-induced traps in the studied films and their interfaces with silicon is inferred from analysis of the space-charge-limited current and capacitance-voltage characteristics taken on Au/amorphous chalcogenide/Si structures. Author Affiliation: (a) Advanced Technology Institute, Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom (b) Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, United Kingdom (c) Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, CB2 1EW, United Kingdom Article History: Received 4 July 2014; Revised 15 March 2015; Accepted 20 May 2015 (footnote)1 Present address: Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy, University of Liverpool, Chadwick Building, Peach St., Liverpool L69 7ZF, United Kingdom.
    Keywords: Semiconductors (Materials) – Analysis ; Semiconductors (Materials) – Electric Properties ; Activation Energy – Analysis ; Activation Energy – Electric Properties ; Silicon – Analysis ; Silicon – Electric Properties;
    ISSN: 00406090
    E-ISSN: 18792731
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, 10/2016, Vol.96(2), S, p.E80
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2016.06.792 Byline: D.W. Kim, A. Niemierko, W. Hwang, A.O. Stemmer-Rachamimov, W.T. Curry, F.G. Barker, R. Martuza, J.S. Loeffler, K.S. Oh, H.A. Shih Author Affiliation: (1) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (2) Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (3) Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (4) Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (5) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (6) Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Article Note: (footnote) Author Disclosure: D.W. Kim: None. A. Niemierko: None. W. Hwang: None. A.O. Stemmer-Rachamimov: Editorial; Brain Pathology. W.T. Curry: Consultant; Stryker CMF. F.G. Barker II: None. R. Martuza: None. J.S. Loeffler: None. K.S. Oh: Research Grant; Merck & Co, Elekta. Honoraria; HK hospital authority. Wrote several review articles; UpToDate. Reviewed and questions writing for CME section; IJROBP. H.A. Shih: Advisory Board; Genentech. Editor; International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics. Writer; UpToDate.
    Keywords: Surgery ; Radiotherapy ; Medical Schools ; Radiation (Physics);
    ISSN: 03603016
    E-ISSN: 1879355X
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, 11/2018, Vol.102(3), S, p.e226
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 03603016
    E-ISSN: 1879355X
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Chronicle of Higher Education, June 15, 2001, Vol.47(40)
    Description: A leading chemistry journal, Langmuir, has delayed publication of a paper by a postdoctoral researcher because of the objections of his supervisor at Northwestern University. [...]Chad A. Mirkin, a prominent chemist at Northwestern who directs the university's Institute for Nanotechnology, in March sent a letter to the journal, accusing it of tarnishing his reputation by circulating Mr. Schwartz's paper for review, and warning that publishing it would jeopardize Mr. Mirkin's and the university's intellectual property rights. "Dr. Mirkin lost his right to authorship when he refused authorship, which is why I submitted the paper as the sole author in the first place," Mr. Schwartz wrote in an April letter to Langmuir. "Since I did the work, and I wrote the paper, it is my right to publish."
    Keywords: Chemistry -- Study And Teaching ; Toole, John Kennedy
    ISSN: 0009-5982
    E-ISSN: 19311362
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 6
    In: Nature Genetics, 2012, Vol.44, pp.1249-1254
    Description: Elevated transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS intuitively imply...
    ISSN: 1061-4036
    Source: NARCIS (National Academic Research and Collaborations Information System)
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Cardiology, 5/1985, Vol.8(1), pp.67-76
    Description: This study was performed to ascertain whether intravenous amiodarone would revert supraventricular tachycardias to sinus rhythm, and if so, whether this effect depended upon the underlying mechanism of the arrhythmia. Fourteen patients were studied. Seven had Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, 1 had dual atrioventricular nodal pathways and 1 an ectopic atrial tachycardia. Five patients had atrial fibrillation without accessory pathways. An atrial electrode was inserted to initiate tachycardias and record the electrogram. If tachycardias were stable for more than 5 min, amiodarone (5 mg/kg) diluted with dextrose saline was infused intravenously over 5 min. Two electrocardiographic leads and the right atrial electrogram were monitored. In 7 patients with atrial fibrillation (2 with accessory pathways), 6 did not revert to sinus rhythm, 1 reverted only after 1 hr. In 5 cases without accessory pathways the ventricular rate fell 5-10 min after commencing amiodarone. Four of the 5 patients with WPW syndrome and re-entrant tachycardias returned to sinus rhythm within 6 min of commencing the infusion (atrioventricular and ventriculoatrial times increased by 0-38% and 0-14% respectively). (Tachycardias terminated in the anterograde limb.) Three patients underwent intermittent right atrial stimulation for 1 hr. No tachycardias could be initiated for 30 min post amiodarone. The ectopic atrial tachycardia and that due to dual atrioventricular nodal pathways terminated within 7 and 2 min, respectively, of commencing intravenous amiodarone. Thus the use of intravenous amiodarone would be appropriate in the acute management of sustained supraventricular tachycardias.
    Keywords: Amiodarone -- Therapeutic Use ; Benzofurans -- Therapeutic Use;
    ISSN: 01675273
    E-ISSN: 18741754
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Cardiology, 1/1986, Vol.10(1), pp.65-69
    Description: We have studied the relationship between age, daily dose, plasma concentration and clinical efficacy of disopyramide in a group of paediatric patients. Twelve children with ventricular and 3 with supraventricular arrhythmias were treated with oral disopyramide. The initial dose was 3-6 mg/kg per day. This was adjusted until a pre-dose plasma concentration greater than 2 mg/I was achieved. Seven patients were judged to have responded to the treatment on clinical criteria. No symptoms or signs of toxicity were observed. In some of the children the dose of disopyramide required to achieve a plasma concentration greater than 2 mg/l was greatly in excess of the normal adult dose. Generally the youngest children required the highest dose, but the variation was wide. The dose could not be predicted from the age, the body weight or the surface area of the patient. In children high doses of disopyramide may be needed to achieve effective plasma concentrations of the drug; such doses are not associated with adverse effects. Measurement of the plasma concentration is necessary to guard against premature termination of therapy.
    Keywords: Arrhythmias, Cardiac -- Drug Therapy ; Disopyramide -- Blood;
    ISSN: 01675273
    E-ISSN: 18741754
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: HortScience : a publication of the American Society for Horticultural Science, 1993, Vol.(2), pp.115-119
    Description: CPPU was applied to whole spur 'Delicious' apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees in central Washington at 0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg.liter-1 at full bloom (FB) or FB plus 2 weeks. At both application times, the flesh firmness of treated fruit linearly increased with increasing concentration. CPPU applied at 0, 5, 10, 15, or 20 mg.liter-1 to spur 'Delicious' trees in Massachusetts at king bloom resulted in a linear increase in flesh firmness at harvest and following 28 weeks in air storage at 0 degrees C. CPPU did not affect the incidence of senescent breakdown, decay, or cork spot. Fruit length:diameter (L/D) ratios generally increased at all doses. Fruit weight was not influenced at either location. All CPPU concentrations reduced return bloom on 'Delicious' apples in Massachusetts in 1989. Of the 10, 20, or 40 mg.liter-1 treatments for 'Empire' apples, only CPPU at 40 mg.liter-1 reduced return bloom. CPPU applied to 'Empire' apples in Massachusetts did not effect fruit set, soluble solids concentration, L/D, or firmness; however, fruit weight increased linearly with concentration. CPPU applied at 100 mg.liter-1 retarded preharvest fruit drop of 'Early Mclntosh' in Massachusetts for approximately 7 days but was not as effective as NAA at 20 mg.liter-1. In a larger semicommercial trial, 'Delicious' fruit treated with CPPU at 5, 10, or 15 mg.liter-1 at FB, petal fall (PF), or PF plus 1 week, respectively, were harvested and graded over a commercial packing line. Malformities caused by CPPU at the highest doses reduced packout, although all CPPU application rates reduced the percent fruit culled due to poor color. CPPU increased packed fruit size, since the size of fruit (64 mm in diameter) in the 150-fruit/box size decreased, while the size of fruit (72 mm in diameter) in the 100- and 130-fruit/box sizes increased. Treated fruit stored for 7 months at 1 degree C were firmer than nontreated controls ; references
    Keywords: Malus Pumila ; Washington ; Cytokinine ; Dose D'Application ; Fruits ; Dimension ; Qualite ; Aptitude A La Conservation ; Acide Naphtalene Acetique ; Malus Pumila ; Washington ; Citoquininas ; Dosis De Aplicacion ; Frutas ; Dimension ; Calidad ; Aptitud Para La Conservacion ; Acido Naftilacetico
    ISSN: 0018-5345
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: American Journal of Transplantation, 04/2007, Vol.7(4), pp.1003-1009
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2006.01702.x Byline: S.R. Johnson (a), S. Alexopoulos (a), M. Curry (a), D.W. Hanto (a) Keywords: Graft failure; liver transplant; outcome; primary nonfunction Abstract: PNF following liver transplantation (LT) is an infrequent but life-threatening complication. Liver allocation under MELD is based upon recipient severity of illness, a known risk factor for the occurrence of PNF. The incidence of PNF since the application of MELD has not previously been reported. The SRTR database was studied since inception of MELD until September 2004 for all adult recipients of deceased donor LT. PNF was defined as graft loss or death within 14 days of LT secondary to PNF or without defined cause. A total of 10545 transplants met inclusion criteria and PNF occurred in 613 (5.81%) of recipients. Univariate analysis demonstrated donor age, serum creatinine 〉1.5 mg/mL, hypertension and CVA as risk factors for PNF. Recipient factors included life support, mechanical ventilation, use of inotropes, hemodialysis, initial status 1 and use of a shared transplant. In the multivariate model only donor age and recipient serum creatinine, bilirubin, on life support and status 1 at transplant were significant risk factors for PNF. In this analysis of PNF in the MELD era the incidence of PNF does not appear to have increased from prior reports. Risk factors for PNF are related to donor age and severity of recipient illness. Author Affiliation: (a)The Transplant Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts Article History: Received 12 August 2006, revised 21 November 2006 and accepted for publication 6 December 2006 Article note: (*) Corresponding author: S. R. Johnson, srjohnso@bidmc.harvard.edu
    Keywords: Databases -- Analysis ; Organ Transplantation -- Analysis;
    ISSN: 1600-6135
    E-ISSN: 1600-6143
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