Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    In: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2016, Vol. 214(5), pp.657-658
    Keywords: Medicine ; Biology;
    ISSN: 0022-1899
    E-ISSN: 1537-6613
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of infectious diseases, 20 October 2018, Vol.218(11), pp.1689-1690
    ISSN: 00221899
    E-ISSN: 1537-6613
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Drugs, June 1, 2006, Vol.66(9), p.1273(1)
    ISSN: 0012-6667
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of infectious diseases, April 2013, Vol.207(7), pp.1166-70
    Description: Recent data suggest that infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C results in prolonged high-level viremia (〉5 log10 copies/mL) during early infection. We examined the relationship between HIV-1 subtype and plasma viremia among 153 African seroconverters. Mean setpoint viral loads were similar for C and non-C subtypes: 4.36 vs 4.42 log10 copies/mL (P = .61). The proportion of subtype C-infected participants with viral loads 〉5 log10 copies/mL was not greater than the proportion for those with non-C infection. Our data do not support the hypothesis that higher early viral load accounts for the rapid spread of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa.
    Keywords: Viral Load ; HIV Infections -- Blood ; HIV Seropositivity -- Virology ; HIV-1 -- Pathogenicity
    ISSN: 00221899
    E-ISSN: 1537-6613
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of infectious diseases, 01 November 2013, Vol.208(9), pp.1366-74
    Description: Daily suppressive therapy with valacyclovir reduces risk of sexual transmission of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in HSV-2-serodiscordant heterosexual couples by 48%. Whether suppressive therapy reduces HSV-2 transmission from persons coinfected with HSV-2 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is unknown. Within a randomized trial of daily acyclovir 400 mg twice daily in African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, in which the HIV-1-infected partner was HSV-2 seropositive, we identified partnerships in which HIV-1-susceptible partners were HSV-2 seronegative to estimate the effect of acyclovir on risk of HSV-2 transmission. We randomly assigned 911 HSV-2/HIV-1-serodiscordant couples to daily receipt of acyclovir or placebo. We observed 68 HSV-2 seroconversions, 40 and 28 in acyclovir and placebo groups, respectively (HSV-2 incidence, 5.1 cases per 100 person-years; hazard ratio [HR], 1.35 [95% confidence interval, .83-2.20]; P = .22). Among HSV-2-susceptible women, vaginal drying practices (adjusted HR, 44.35; P = .004) and unprotected sex (adjusted HR, 9.91; P = .002) were significant risk factors for HSV-2 acquisition; having more children was protective (adjusted HR, 0.47 per additional child; P = .012). Among HSV-2-susceptible men, only age ≤30 years was associated with increased risk of HSV-2 acquisition (P = .016). Treatment of African HSV-2/HIV-1-infected persons with daily suppressive acyclovir did not decrease risk of HSV-2 transmission to susceptible partners. More-effective prevention strategies to reduce HSV-2 transmission from HIV-1-infected persons are needed.
    Keywords: Africa ; HIV-1 ; Hsv-2 ; Acyclovir ; Serodiscordant Couples ; Transmission ; HIV-1 ; Acyclovir -- Administration & Dosage ; Antiviral Agents -- Administration & Dosage ; Coinfection -- Drug Therapy ; HIV Infections -- Drug Therapy ; Herpes Genitalis -- Prevention & Control ; Herpesvirus 2, Human -- Drug Effects
    ISSN: 00221899
    E-ISSN: 1537-6613
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: AIDS Care, 03 August 2018, Vol.30(8), pp.1062-1069
    Description: Much of the research examining predictors of HIV testing has used retrospective self-report to assess HIV testing. Findings. therefore, may be subject to recall bias and to difficulties determining the direction of associations. In this prospective study, we administered surveys to women in...
    Keywords: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) ; Point-of-Care Testing ; Health Knowledge ; Attitudes ; Practice ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0954-0121
    E-ISSN: 1360-0451
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2015, Vol.10(4), p.e0123005
    Description: Rapid HIV assays are the mainstay of HIV testing globally. Delivery of effective biomedical HIV prevention strategies such as antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) requires periodic HIV testing. Because rapid tests have high (〉95%) but imperfect specificity, they are expected to...
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Annals of internal medicine, 01 July 2014, Vol.161(1), pp.11-9
    Description: Daily oral preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using the antiretroviral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) alone or in combination with emtricitabine (FTC-TDF) reduces the risk for HIV-1 acquisition. Tenofovir has in vitro activity against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). To assess the efficacy of daily oral PrEP with tenofovir and FTC-TDF in the prevention of HSV-2 acquisition. Subgroup analysis of data from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial with concealed allocation. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00557245). Multiple sites in Kenya and Uganda. Heterosexual men and women who were seronegative for HIV-1 and HSV-2 and at high risk for HIV-1 acquisition due to having an HIV-1-infected partner. Once-daily oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), alone or combined with emtricitabine (FTC-TDF), compared with placebo. HSV-2 seroconversion. A total of 131 participants seroconverted to HSV-2 (79 of 1041 assigned to tenofovir or FTC-TDF PrEP [HSV-2 incidence, 5.6 per 100 person-years] and 52 of 481 assigned to placebo [HSV-2 incidence, 7.7 per 100 person-years]). The hazard ratio (HR) for HSV-2 acquisition with daily oral PrEP was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.49 to 0.99; P = 0.047) compared with placebo, and the absolute risk reduction was 2.1 per 100 person-years. Among the 1044 participants with HSV-2-infected partners, the HR for PrEP was 0.67 (CI, 0.46 to 0.98; P = 0.038) compared with placebo, and the absolute risk reduction was 3.1 per 100 person-years. Randomization was not stratified by HSV-2 status, and diagnostic tests to exclude participants with acute HSV-2 at baseline are not available. Daily oral tenofovir-based PrEP significantly reduced the risk for HSV-2 acquisition among heterosexual men and women. Modest protection against HSV-2 is an added benefit of HIV-1 prevention with oral tenofovir-based PrEP. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
    Keywords: Herpesvirus 2, Human ; Adenine -- Analogs & Derivatives ; Antiviral Agents -- Therapeutic Use ; Deoxycytidine -- Analogs & Derivatives ; Herpes Genitalis -- Prevention & Control ; Organophosphonates -- Therapeutic Use
    ISSN: 00034819
    E-ISSN: 1539-3704
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    In: JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, June 24, 1998, Vol.279(24), p.2003(2)
    Description: Topical imiquimod cream and podofilox gel both appear to be effective in treating external anogenital warts, but neither treatment is optimal. Anogenital warts are caused by infection with human papillomavirus and can be sexually transmitted. Conventional treatments include freezing, destruction by trichloroacetic acid, or other procedures performed by physicians. Topical medications applied by the patients are highly desirable, but both imiquimod and podofilox take many weeks to clear the warts, and many patients do not respond or have a recurrence of warts.
    Keywords: Genital Warts -- Drug Therapy ; Topical Drugs -- Evaluation
    ISSN: 0098-7484
    E-ISSN: 15383598
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    In: The New England Journal of Medicine, 2012, Vol.367(5), pp.399-410
    Description: Background Antiretroviral preexposure prophylaxis is a promising approach for preventing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in heterosexual populations. Methods We conducted a randomized trial of oral antiretroviral therapy for use as preexposure prophylaxis among HIV-1–serodiscordant heterosexual couples from Kenya and Uganda. The HIV-1–seronegative partner in each couple was randomly assigned to one of three study regimens — once-daily tenofovir (TDF), combination tenofovir–emtricitabine (TDF–FTC), or matching placebo — and followed monthly for up to 36 months. At enrollment, the HIV-1–seropositive partners were not eligible for antiretroviral therapy, according to national guidelines. All couples received standard HIV-1 treatment and prevention services. Results We enrolled 4758 couples, of whom 4747 were followed: 1584 randomly assigned to TDF, 1579 to TDF–FTC, and 1584 to placebo. For 62% of the couples followed, the HIV-1–seronegative partner was male. Among HIV-1–seropositive participants, the median CD4 count was 495 cells per cubic millimeter (interquartile range, 375 to 662). A total of 82 HIV-1 infections occurred in seronegative participants during the study, 17 in the TDF group (incidence, 0.65 per 100 person-years), 13 in the TDF–FTC group (incidence, 0.50 per 100 person-years), and 52 in the placebo group (incidence, 1.99 per 100 person-years), indicating a relative reduction of 67% in the incidence of HIV-1 with TDF (95% confidence interval [CI], 44 to 81; P〈0.001) and of 75% with TDF–FTC (95% CI, 55 to 87; P〈0.001). Protective effects of TDF–FTC and TDF alone against HIV-1 were not significantly different (P=0.23), and both study medications significantly reduced the HIV-1 incidence among both men and women. The rate of serious adverse events was similar across the study groups. Eight participants receiving active treatment were found to have been infected with HIV-1 at baseline, and among these eight, antiretroviral resistance developed in two during the study. Conclusions Oral TDF and TDF–FTC both protect against HIV-1 infection in heterosexual men and women. (Funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Partners PrEP ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00557245 .) In this study of 4758 HIV-1–serodiscordant heterosexual couples in Kenya and Uganda, daily antiretroviral prophylaxis (with tenofovir or emtricitabine–tenofovir) in the HIV-1–negative partner significantly decreased the risk of HIV infection. The use of antiretroviral medications for the prevention of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) transmission is a promising strategy for reducing the spread of HIV-1.1–4 Antiretroviral treatment for persons infected with HIV-1 provides important clinical benefits and substantially reduces infectiousness.5–7 Antiretroviral prophylaxis is a potential HIV-1–prevention strategy for those not yet infected with HIV-1, administered either as postexposure prophylaxis after high-risk occupational or nonoccupational exposure or as preexposure prophylaxis in those with ongoing HIV-1 exposure.8,9 The rationale for antiretroviral prophylaxis in persons with ongoing exposure is based on its efficacy in infants exposed to HIV-1 during birth and . . .
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0028-4793
    E-ISSN: 1533-4406
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages