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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Pediatrics, February 2011, Vol.127(2), pp.e336-44
    Description: We assessed differences in chlamydia screening rates according to race/ethnicity, insurance status, age, and previous sexually transmitted infection (STI) or pregnancy. A retrospective cohort study was performed using electronic medical record and billing data for women 14 to 25 years of age in 2002-2007, assessing differences in the odds of a chlamydia test being performed at that visit. Adjusted odds of a chlamydia test being performed were lower among women 14 to 15 years of age (odds ratio: 0.83 [95% confidence interval: 0.70-1.00]) and 20 to 25 years of age (20-21 years, odds ratio: 0.78 [95% confidence interval: 0.70-0.89]; 22-23 years, odds ratio: 0.76 [95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.87]; 24-25 years, odds ratio: 0.64 [95% confidence interval: 0.57-0.73]), compared with women 18 to 19 years of age. Black women had 3 times increased odds (odds ratio: 2.96 [95% confidence interval: 2.66-3.28]) and Hispanic women nearly 13 times increased odds (odds ratio: 12.89 [95% confidence interval: 10.85-15.30]) of testing, compared with white women. Women with public (odds ratio: 1.74 [95% confidence interval: 1.58-1.91]) and public pending (odds ratio: 6.85 [95% confidence interval: 5.13-9.15]) insurance had increased odds of testing, compared with women with private insurance. After first STI diagnosis, differences according to race/ethnicity persisted but were smaller; after first pregnancy, differences persisted. Despite recommendations to screen all sexually active young women for chlamydia, providers screened women differently according to age, race/ethnicity, and insurance status, although differences were reduced after first STI or pregnancy.
    Keywords: Chlamydia Infections -- Diagnosis ; Health Personnel -- Standards ; Mass Screening -- Methods
    ISSN: 00314005
    E-ISSN: 1098-4275
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Hormones and Behavior, July 2013, Vol.64(2), pp.280-287
    Description: This article is part of a Special Issue “Puberty and Adolescence”. Sexuality emerges as a major developmental element of puberty and the adolescent years that follow. However, connecting the sexuality that emerges with puberty and elements of adult sexuality is difficult because much adolescent sexuality research addresses the transition to partnered sexual behaviors (primarily coitus) and consequences such as unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. This review proposes a framework of an expanded understanding of puberty and adolescent sexuality from the perspective of four hallmarks of adult sexuality: sexual desire; sexual arousal; sexual behaviors; and, sexual function. This approach thus addresses important gaps in understanding of the ontogeny of sex and the continuum of sexuality development from adolescence through the adult lifespan.
    Keywords: Sexuality ; Adolescence ; Puberty ; Sexual Behavior ; Masturbation ; Abstinence ; Sexual Desire ; Sexual Arousal ; Sexual Function ; Medicine ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0018-506X
    E-ISSN: 1095-6867
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, 2011, Vol.49(3), pp.327-329
    Description: A sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnosis may profoundly change the meaning of adolescent women's relationships, particularly when the relationship involves a shared child. This study explored the sexual, contraceptive, and emotional characteristics of sexual partners with whom adolescent women had and did not have children in the 3 months after the first STI diagnosis. Adolescent women (n = 387; age: 14–17 years at enrollment) were tested quarterly for STI and completed partner-specific items on emotional and sexual relationship content. We used nonparametric statistics (SPSS/18.0) to compare these characteristics between partners with whom these adolescent women did (n = 20) or did not (n = 118) share a child. Rates of condom use at last sex, overall condom use, and condom insistence were lower with sexual partners involving shared children as compared with childless sexual partners. Relationship status, commitment to partner, and using no method of contraception were more common in parous sexual relationships as compared with nulliparous sexual relationships after an STI. After an STI, adolescent women have different sexual risk behaviors with the fathers of their children, even after a signal event such as a recent STI diagnosis. Tailored counseling may specifically address the challenges of STI prevention with partners who have the unique status of being the “father of the baby.”
    Keywords: Pregnant and Parent Adolescents ; Sti ; Sexual Relationships ; Sexual and Contraceptive Behavior ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
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  • 4
    In: AIDS, 2013, Vol.27 Suppl 1, pp.S127-S133
    Description: Sexual health is an evolving paradigm that integrates a positive approach to sexuality with existing public health policy and practice for reducing the burdens of sexually transmitted infections, including those due to HIV. The sexual health paradigm rests in commitment to sexual rights, sexual knowledge, sexual choice, and sexual pleasure, as well as key elements of sexuality addressed by sexual desire, sexual arousal, and sexual function, and sexual behaviors. The sexual health paradigm offers new approaches to supporting general health and well being while reducing the burdens of sexual diseases and their consequences.
    Keywords: Sexuality ; Infection ; Sexual Behavior ; Public Health ; Rights ; Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ; Infectious Diseases ; Human Immunodeficiency Virus ; Sexual Behavior ; Sexually Transmitted Diseases ; Public Health ; AIDS and HIV ; Microorganisms & Parasites ; Diseases/Injuries/Trauma ; Prevention ; Sexual Health ; Sexuality;
    ISSN: 0269-9370
    E-ISSN: 14735571
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Hormones and Behavior, 2011, Vol.59(5), pp.739-744
    Description: Theoretical and empirical linkages of adult women's sexual interest and sexual behaviors are relatively well-established, but few data address similar issues in adolescent women. This paper reviews data from published reports of associations of adolescent women's sexual interest and various sexual behaviors. All of the papers reported data collected from a single longitudinal cohort of young women. The primary source of data collection was daily diaries, allowing close temporal pairing of sexual interest with sexual behaviors. Young women's sexual interest on a given day was consistently and independently associated with sexual activity on that day, whether the behavior was first lifetime coitus, coitus, fellatio, cunnilingus, anal intercourse, or coitus during menses. We also found no evidence of influence of hormonal contraceptives on young women's sexual interest. Taken together, these data demonstrate the relevance of sexual interest as a key factor in young women's sexuality and sexual behavior. ► The association of sexual interest and sexual behaviors in adolescent women is not well understood. ► We used previously published data from a single cohort of adolescent women to explore these associations. ► We showed a consistent association of higher levels of sexual interest with first coitus, coital and non-coital sexual behaviors, and with coitus during menses. ► We did not find an association of sexual interest and hormonal contraceptive use.
    Keywords: Adolescence ; Sexual Interest ; Sexual Behavior ; Oral Sex ; Anal Sex ; Medicine ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0018-506X
    E-ISSN: 1095-6867
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Social Science & Medicine, May 2012, Vol.74(9), pp.1444-1451
    Description: Most models exploring adolescent health behavior have focused on individual influences to understand behavior change. The goal of the current study was to assess the role of adolescent romantic partners on the expression of health behavior. Our sample utilized two waves of data from the US National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, which included 80 romantic dyads (160 individuals). A longitudinal multilevel analysis was conducted. We assessed individual and romantic partner health-harming behaviors (i.e., delinquency, alcohol use, smoking, and marijuana use), health-protective behaviors (i.e., physical activity, physical inactivity, sleep patterns, seatbelt use, and contraception motivations), as well as the role of gender and age. Participants average age was 16 years at baseline. We found evidence for partner similarity and partner influence with the majority of health-harming behaviors. Specifically, partner influence was evident for smoking and alcohol use with partner influence approaching significance for marijuana use. We found limited evidence for partner similarity and partner influence for health-protective behaviors. The importance of assessing romantic dyads was evident in these data. Interventions focusing on health-harming behavior for adolescent populations are important public health goals. It is recommended that future intervention efforts with adolescent health-harming behaviors should target not only peers, but also consider the role of romantic partners. ► Adolescent romantic partners clearly impact the expression of health-harming behavior, such as smoking and alcohol use. ► Adolescent romantic partner influences were not noted with health-protective behavior. ► Future research should explore the impact of including romantic partners in health-harming intervention research.
    Keywords: USA ; Adolescence ; Health Behavior ; Romantic Couples ; Medicine ; Social Sciences (General) ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0277-9536
    E-ISSN: 1873-5347
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, December 2012, Vol.51(6), pp.551-556
    Description: To understand linkage to care practices at sites providing clinical services to newly diagnosed HIV-positive adolescents. Qualitative analysis of detailed interviews conducted with 28 personnel involved in linkage to care at 15 sites providing specialty care to HIV-positive adolescents. We showed that multiple models exist for linkage to care, and that both formal and informal community relationships are important for successful linkage to care. Stigma was seen as a universal issue, enhancing the importance of the balance of confidentiality and social support. Barriers to care, such as mental health issues, substance use, and transportation, are common. We conclude that the complexity of linkage to care requires thought and planning as HIV testing is expanded to lower-risk populations.
    Keywords: Adolescents ; HIV-Related Care ; Linkage to Care ; Youth ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, April, 2013, Vol.52(4), p.S29-S34
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.02.002 Byline: Rebekah L. Williams, J. Dennis Fortenberry Abstract: Unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STI) continue to be significant public health problems, and adolescents are disproportionately affected by both. With national attention and funding directed toward adolescent pregnancy prevention, promotion of long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) use among adolescents is both timely and relevant. However, LARCs provide no protection against STIs, requiring dual-method use of both LARC and barrier methods, most commonly the male latex condom, to address these issues simultaneously. Rates of both LARC and dual-method contraception are low in the United States, but have increased in recent years. Dual-method contraception is highest among younger women and adolescents with multiple or new sex partners. Consistent condom use remains a major barrier to dual-method use, as it necessitates admission of STI risk by both partners, and use is dependent upon two decision-makers rather than a single contraceptive user. Promoting the initiation and maintenance of LARC and condom use across multiple partnered sexual encounters requires understanding of individual, dyadic, and social influences. Successful maintenance of contraceptive and STI prevention behaviors requires individualized, longitudinal reinforcement, and social supports, but can ultimately reduce the burden of unintended pregnancy and STI among adolescents. Author Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Section of Adolescent Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana Article History: Received 17 July 2012; Accepted 4 February 2013 Article Note: (footnote) Publication of this article was funded by The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy.
    Keywords: Youth -- Sexual Behavior ; Youth -- Social Aspects ; Condoms -- Usage ; Condoms -- Social Aspects ; Oral Contraceptives -- Usage ; Oral Contraceptives -- Social Aspects
    ISSN: 1054-139X
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, March 2010, Vol.46(3), pp.232-237
    Description: To examine the distribution of and factors associated with event-level heterosexual anal sex and of event-level condom use during anal sex among adolescent women. Adolescent women (N = 387; age 14–17 years at enrollment) were recruited from primary care clinics for a longitudinal cohort study of sexually transmitted infections and sexual behavior. Data were taken from daily sexual diaries; generalized estimating equation logistic regression assessed the likelihood of anal sex or condom use during anal sex on a given day. Heterosexual anal intercourse is a small but nonrandom event-level component in adolescent women's sexual behavior. About 30% of anal sex events were condom protected. Mood, partner, and situational factors predicted anal sex, but not condom use during anal sex; within-day and recent behavior factors were the strongest influences on both outcomes. Our findings suggest the importance of providers' screening adolescent women patients during office visits about anal sex and about condom use during anal sex, as well as asking questions about the context of these behaviors to appropriately tailor risk reduction counseling.
    Keywords: Anal Sex ; Condoms ; Adolescent Women ; Diary Data ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, 2010, Vol.47(2), pp.115-125
    Description: This review presents a summary of existing knowledge regarding the effect of testicular cancer along four broad domains, including romantic and sexual relationships, body image, and fertility. A total of 37 studies were reviewed. Of note, most research consists of older adult testicular cancer survivors, with very little research attention afforded to adolescent and young adult survivorship. Relationship status (i.e., partnered versus unpartnered) appears to play an important role as it relates to adjustment outcomes in testicular cancer survivors. In addition, sexual function (and thereby fertility) and body image are also frequently compromised. Implications regarding a lack of developmentally focused research on adolescent and young adult testicular cancer survivorship are discussed, along with recommendations for new research.
    Keywords: Testicular Cancer ; Survivors ; Adolescent and Young Adult ; Relationships ; Body Image ; Fertility ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
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