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  • 1
    Description: Shell scripts for the RNA-Seq analysis of the following study: Fröhlich KS, Förstner KU, Gitai Z. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by an Hfq-independent small RNA in Caulobacter crescentus. Nucleic Acids Res. 2018 Aug 27. https://doi.org/10.1093/nar/gky765. The sequencing data are deposited at NCBI GEO under the accession number GSE104186.      ...
    Source: DataCite
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.e17296
    Description: P-bodies are dynamic aggregates of RNA and proteins involved in several post-transcriptional regulation processes. P-bodies have been shown to play important roles in regulating viral infection, whereas their interplay with bacterial pathogens, specifically intracellular bacteria that extensively manipulate host cell pathways, remains unknown. Here, we report that Salmonella infection induces P-body disassembly in a cell type-specific manner, and independently of previously characterized pathways such as inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis or microRNA-mediated gene silencing. We show that the Salmonella -induced P-body disassembly depends on the activation of the SPI-2 encoded type 3 secretion system, and that the secreted effector protein SpvB plays a major role in this process. P-body disruption is also induced by the related pathogen, Shigella flexneri , arguing that this might be a new mechanism by which intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert host cell function.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Molecular Biology ; Cell Biology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, 16 November 2018, Vol.46(20), pp.10969-10982
    Description: Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are a heterogeneous group of post-transcriptional regulators that often act at the heart of large networks. Hundreds of sRNAs have been discovered by genome-wide screens and most of these sRNAs exert their functions by base-pairing with target mRNAs. However, studies addressing the molecular roles of sRNAs have been largely confined to gamma-proteobacteria, such as Escherichia coli. Here we identify and characterize a novel sRNA, ChvR, from the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Transcription of chvR is controlled by the conserved two-component system ChvI-ChvG and it is expressed in response to DNA damage, low pH, and growth in minimal medium. Transient over-expression of ChvR in combination with genome-wide transcriptome profiling identified the mRNA of the TonB-dependent receptor ChvT as the sole target of ChvR. Genetic and biochemical analyses showed that ChvR represses ChvT at the post-transcriptional level through direct base-pairing. Fine-mapping of the ChvR-chvT interaction revealed the requirement of two distinct base-pairing sites for full target regulation. Finally, we show that ChvR-controlled repression of chvT is independent of the ubiquitous RNA-chaperone Hfq, and therefore distinct from previously reported mechanisms employed by prototypical bacterial sRNAs. These findings have implications for the mechanism and evolution of sRNA function across bacterial species.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Bacterial Proteins -- Genetics ; Caulobacter Crescentus -- Genetics ; Host Factor 1 Protein -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Genetics
    ISSN: 03051048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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  • 4
    In: Nucleic Acids Research, 2016, Vol. 44(21), pp.10406-10422
    Description: Model enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica express hundreds of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), targets for most of which are yet unknown. Some sRNAs are remarkably well conserved, indicating that they serve cellular functions that go beyond the necessities of a single species. One of these ‘core sRNAs’ of largely unknown function is the abundant ∼100-nucleotide SdsR sRNA which is transcribed by the general stress σ-factor, σ S and accumulates in stationary phase. In Salmonella , SdsR was known to inhibit the synthesis of the species-specific porin, OmpD. However, sdsR genes are present in almost all enterobacterial genomes, suggesting that additional, conserved targets of this sRNA must exist. Here, we have combined SdsR pulse-expression with whole genome transcriptomics to discover 20 previously unknown candidate targets of SdsR which include mRNAs coding for physiologically important regulators such as the carbon utilization regulator, CRP, the nucleoid-associated chaperone, StpA and the antibiotic resistance transporter, TolC. Processing of SdsR by RNase E results in two cellular SdsR variants with distinct target spectra. While the overall physiological role of this orphan core sRNA remains to be fully understood, the new SdsR targets present valuable leads to determine sRNA functions in resting bacteria.
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Anatomy & Physiology;
    ISSN: 0305-1048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Microbiology spectrum, July 2018, Vol.6(4)
    Description: The ability of bacteria to thrive in diverse habitats and to adapt to ever-changing environmental conditions relies on the rapid and stringent modulation of gene expression. It has become evident in the past decade that small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are central components of networks controlling the bacterial responses to stress. Functioning at the posttranscriptional level, sRNAs base-pair with cognate mRNAs to alter translation, stability, or both to either repress or activate the targeted transcripts; the RNA chaperone Hfq participates in stabilizing sRNAs and in promoting pairing between target and sRNA. In particular, sRNAs act at the heart of crucial stress responses, including those dedicated to overcoming membrane damage and oxidative stress, discussed here. The bacterial cell envelope is the outermost protective barrier against the environment and thus is constantly monitored and remodeled. Here, we review the integration of sRNAs into the complex networks of several major envelope stress responses of Gram-negative bacteria, including the RpoE (σ), Cpx, and Rcs regulons. Oxidative stress, caused by bacterial respiratory activity or induced by toxic molecules, can lead to significant damage of cellular components. In and related bacteria, sRNAs also contribute significantly to the function of the RpoS (σ)-dependent general stress response as well as the specific OxyR- and SoxR/S-mediated responses to oxidative damage. Their activities in gene regulation and crosstalk to other stress-induced regulons are highlighted.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Enterobacteriaceae -- Metabolism ; Oxidative Stress -- Physiology ; RNA, Bacterial -- Metabolism
    E-ISSN: 2165-0497
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, April 2012, Vol.40(8), pp.3623-40
    Description: A remarkable feature of many small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) of Escherichia coli and Salmonella is their accumulation in the stationary phase of bacterial growth. Several stress response regulators and sigma factors have been reported to direct the transcription of stationary phase-specific sRNAs, but a widely conserved sRNA gene that is controlled by the major stationary phase and stress sigma factor, σ(S) (RpoS), has remained elusive. We have studied in Salmonella the conserved SdsR sRNA, previously known as RyeB, one of the most abundant stationary phase-specific sRNAs in E. coli. Alignments of the sdsR promoter region and genetic analysis strongly suggest that this sRNA gene is selectively transcribed by σ(S). We show that SdsR down-regulates the synthesis of the major Salmonella porin OmpD by Hfq-dependent base pairing; SdsR thus represents the fourth sRNA to regulate this major outer membrane porin. Similar to the InvR, MicC and RybB sRNAs, SdsR recognizes the ompD mRNA in the coding sequence, suggesting that this mRNA may be primarily targeted downstream of the start codon. The SdsR-binding site in ompD was localized by 3'-RACE, an experimental approach that promises to be of use in predicting other sRNA-target interactions in bacteria.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; Porins -- Biosynthesis ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Metabolism ; Salmonella -- Genetics ; Sigma Factor -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 03051048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, 01 December 2016, Vol.44(21), pp.10406-10422
    Description: Model enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica express hundreds of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), targets for most of which are yet unknown. Some sRNAs are remarkably well conserved, indicating that they serve cellular functions that go beyond the necessities of a single species. One of these 'core sRNAs' of largely unknown function is the abundant ∼100-nucleotide SdsR sRNA which is transcribed by the general stress σ-factor, σ and accumulates in stationary phase. In Salmonella, SdsR was known to inhibit the synthesis of the species-specific porin, OmpD. However, sdsR genes are present in almost all enterobacterial genomes, suggesting that additional, conserved targets of this sRNA must exist. Here, we have combined SdsR pulse-expression with whole genome transcriptomics to discover 20 previously unknown candidate targets of SdsR which include mRNAs coding for physiologically important regulators such as the carbon utilization regulator, CRP, the nucleoid-associated chaperone, StpA and the antibiotic resistance transporter, TolC. Processing of SdsR by RNase E results in two cellular SdsR variants with distinct target spectra. While the overall physiological role of this orphan core sRNA remains to be fully understood, the new SdsR targets present valuable leads to determine sRNA functions in resting bacteria.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; RNA Interference ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Genetics ; Salmonella -- Genetics
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 28 May 2019, Vol.116(22), pp.10978-10987
    Description: We have solved the X-ray crystal structure of the RNA chaperone protein Hfq from the alpha-proteobacterium to 2.15-Å resolution, resolving the conserved core of the protein and the entire C-terminal domain (CTD). The structure reveals that the CTD of neighboring hexamers pack in crystal contacts, and that the acidic residues at the C-terminal tip of the protein interact with positive residues on the rim of Hfq, as has been recently proposed for a mechanism of modulating RNA binding. De novo computational models predict a similar docking of the acidic tip residues against the core of Hfq. We also show that Hfq has sRNA binding and RNA annealing activities and is capable of facilitating the annealing of certain sRNA:mRNA pairs in vivo. Finally, we describe how the Hfq CTD and its acidic tip residues provide a mechanism to modulate annealing activity and substrate specificity in various bacteria.
    Keywords: Caulobacter ; Hfq ; RNA–Protein Interaction ; Natively Unstructured Protein ; Srna
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: eLife, 31 December 2014, Vol.3
    Description: Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are key elements of regulatory networks that modulate gene expression. The sRNA RydC of Salmonella sp. and Escherichia coli is an example of this class of riboregulators. Like many other sRNAs, RydC bears a 'seed' region that recognises specific transcripts through base-pairing, and its activities are facilitated by the RNA chaperone Hfq. The crystal structure of RydC in complex with E. coli Hfq at a 3.48 Å resolution illuminates how the protein interacts with and presents the sRNA for target recognition. Consolidating the protein-RNA complex is a host of distributed interactions mediated by the natively unstructured termini of Hfq. Based on the structure and other data, we propose a model for a dynamic effector complex comprising Hfq, small RNA, and the cognate mRNA target.
    Keywords: E. Coli ; Hfq ; RNA–Protein Interactions ; Rydc ; Biophysics ; Gene Regulation ; Natively Unstructured Protein ; Srna ; Structural Biology ; Host Factor 1 Protein -- Metabolism ; RNA, Bacterial -- Metabolism
    E-ISSN: 2050-084X
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, 08 April 2019, Vol.47(6), pp.3171-3183
    Description: Bacteria use quorum sensing to monitor cell density and coordinate group behaviours. In Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, quorum sensing is connected to virulence gene expression via the two autoinducer molecules, AI-2 and CAI-1. Both autoinducers share one signal transduction pathway to control the production of AphA, a key transcriptional activator of biofilm formation and virulence genes. In this study, we demonstrate that the recently identified autoinducer, DPO, also controls AphA production in V. cholerae. DPO, functioning through the transcription factor VqmA and the VqmR small RNA, reduces AphA levels at the post-transcriptional level and consequently inhibits virulence gene expression. VqmR-mediated repression of AphA provides an important link between the AI-2/CAI-1 and DPO-dependent quorum sensing pathways in V. cholerae. Transcriptome analyses comparing the effect of single autoinducers versus autoinducer combinations show that quorum sensing controls the expression of ∼400 genes in V. cholerae and that all three autoinducers are required for a full quorum sensing response. Together, our data provide a global view on autoinducer interplay in V. cholerae and highlight the importance of RNA-based gene control for collective functions in this major human pathogen.
    Keywords: Ketones ; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial -- Genetics ; Homoserine -- Analogs & Derivatives ; Vibrio Cholerae -- Genetics ; Virulence -- Genetics
    ISSN: 03051048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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