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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 2011, Vol.137(4), pp.733-738
    Description: Byline: Nils Winkelmann (1), Iver Petersen (2), Michael Kiehntopf (3), Hans Joerg Fricke (1), Andreas Hochhaus (1), Ulrich Wedding (1) Keywords: Geriatric assessment; Malignant lymphoma; Comorbidity; Survival; Prognostic value Abstract: Purpose The prevalence of elderly and comorbid patients (pts) with malignant lymphoma (ML) will steadily increase in future. Elderly patients comprise a heterogeneous population. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is an established diagnostic tool in geriatric medicine. However, the prognostic value in patients with ML is unclear. We sought to establish a relationship between results of CGA and survival time in patients with ML. Methods Newly diagnosed patients with ML and indication for chemotherapeutical treatment were prospectively recruited in an observational trial. In addition to usual diagnostic work up, a CGA including activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and comorbidities was performed. Association of patients' characteristics and results of CGA with survival were analysed according to Kaplan--Meier method and in a multivariate Cox-regression analysis. Results About 143 patients were included, median age was 63 years, 63 patients were women. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 62 months. Sixty-six patients died within this time. Advanced age, poor Karnofsky performance status, dependence in ADL and IADL and presence of severe comorbidity were significantly associated with shorter survival time. In a Cox-regression analysis, IADL (HR 2.1 95% CI 1.1--3.9) and comorbidity (HR 1.9 95% CI 0.9--3.9) were independent and strongest associated with survival time. Conclusion Results of CGA, such as IADL and comorbidities, are prognostic variables for survival of patients with ML. Results should be validated in homogeneous clinical groups and if confirmed included in diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm. Author Affiliation: (1) Klinik fur Innere Medizin II, Abteilung Hamatologie und internistische Onkologie, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747, Jena, Germany (2) Institut fur Pathologie, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Ziegenmuhlenweg 1, 07743, Jena, Germany (3) Institut fur Klinische Chemie und Laboratoriumsdiagnostik, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747, Jena, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 18/06/2010 Received Date: 27/05/2010 Accepted Date: 18/06/2010 Online Date: 03/07/2010
    Keywords: Geriatric assessment ; Malignant lymphoma ; Comorbidity ; Survival ; Prognostic value
    ISSN: 0171-5216
    E-ISSN: 1432-1335
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Medical Case Reports, 01 January 2010, Vol.4(1), p.19
    Description: Abstract Introduction Unilateral optic neuropathy is commonly due to a prechiasmatic affliction of the anterior visual pathway, while losses in visual hemifields result from the damage to brain hemispheres. Here we report the unusual case of a patient who suffered from acute optic neuropathy following hemispherical subdural hematoma. Although confirmed up to now only through necropsy studies, our case strongly suggests a local, microcirculatory deficit identified through magnetic resonance imaging in vivo. Case presentation A 70-year-old Caucasian German who developed a massive left hemispheric subdural hematoma under oral anticoagulation presented with acute, severe visual impairment on his left eye, which was noticed after surgical decompression. Neurologic and ophthalmologic examinations indicated sinistral optic neuropathy with visual acuity reduced nearly to amaurosis. Ocular pathology such as vitreous body hemorrhage, papilledema, and central retinal artery occlusion were excluded. An orbital lesion was ruled out by means of orbital magnetic resonance imaging. However, cerebral diffusion-weighted imaging and T2 maps of magnetic resonance imaging revealed a circumscribed ischemic lesion within the edematous, slightly herniated temporomesial lobe within the immediate vicinity of the affected optic nerve. Thus, the clinical course and morphologic magnetic resonance imaging findings suggest the occurrence of pressure-induced posterior ischemic optic neuropathy due to microcirculatory compromise. Conclusion Although lesions of the second cranial nerve following subdural hematoma have been reported individually, their pathogenesis was preferentially proposed from autopsy studies. Here we discuss a dual, pressure-induced and secondarily ischemic pathomechanism on the base of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging diagnostics which may remain unconsidered by computed tomography.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1752-1947
    E-ISSN: 1752-1947
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Medical Case Reports, Jan 22, 2010, Vol.4, p.19
    Description: Introduction Unilateral optic neuropathy is commonly due to a prechiasmatic affliction of the anterior visual pathway, while losses in visual hemifields result from the damage to brain hemispheres. Here we report the unusual case of a patient who suffered from acute optic neuropathy following hemispherical subdural hematoma. Although confirmed up to now only through necropsy studies, our case strongly suggests a local, microcirculatory deficit identified through magnetic resonance imaging in vivo. Case presentation A 70-year-old Caucasian German who developed a massive left hemispheric subdural hematoma under oral anticoagulation presented with acute, severe visual impairment on his left eye, which was noticed after surgical decompression. Neurologic and ophthalmologic examinations indicated sinistral optic neuropathy with visual acuity reduced nearly to amaurosis. Ocular pathology such as vitreous body hemorrhage, papilledema, and central retinal artery occlusion were excluded. An orbital lesion was ruled out by means of orbital magnetic resonance imaging. However, cerebral diffusion-weighted imaging and T2 maps of magnetic resonance imaging revealed a circumscribed ischemic lesion within the edematous, slightly herniated temporomesial lobe within the immediate vicinity of the affected optic nerve. Thus, the clinical course and morphologic magnetic resonance imaging findings suggest the occurrence of pressure-induced posterior ischemic optic neuropathy due to microcirculatory compromise. Conclusion Although lesions of the second cranial nerve following subdural hematoma have been reported individually, their pathogenesis was preferentially proposed from autopsy studies. Here we discuss a dual, pressure-induced and secondarily ischemic pathomechanism on the base of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging diagnostics which may remain unconsidered by computed tomography.
    Keywords: Optic Nerve Diseases -- Risk Factors ; Optic Nerve Diseases -- Diagnosis ; Optic Nerve Diseases -- Care And Treatment ; Optic Nerve Diseases -- Patient Outcomes ; Optic Nerve Diseases -- Case Studies ; Subdural Hematoma -- Risk Factors ; Subdural Hematoma -- Diagnosis ; Subdural Hematoma -- Care And Treatment ; Subdural Hematoma -- Patient Outcomes ; Subdural Hematoma -- Case Studies ; Anticoagulants -- Usage ; Anticoagulants -- Health Aspects
    ISSN: 1752-1947
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Medical Case Reports, Jan 22, 2010, Vol.4, p.19
    Description: Introduction Unilateral optic neuropathy is commonly due to a prechiasmatic affliction of the anterior visual pathway, while losses in visual hemifields result from the damage to brain hemispheres. Here we report the unusual case of a patient who suffered from acute optic neuropathy following hemispherical subdural hematoma. Although confirmed up to now only through necropsy studies, our case strongly suggests a local, microcirculatory deficit identified through magnetic resonance imaging in vivo. Case presentation A 70-year-old Caucasian German who developed a massive left hemispheric subdural hematoma under oral anticoagulation presented with acute, severe visual impairment on his left eye, which was noticed after surgical decompression. Neurologic and ophthalmologic examinations indicated sinistral optic neuropathy with visual acuity reduced nearly to amaurosis. Ocular pathology such as vitreous body hemorrhage, papilledema, and central retinal artery occlusion were excluded. An orbital lesion was ruled out by means of orbital magnetic resonance imaging. However, cerebral diffusion-weighted imaging and T2 maps of magnetic resonance imaging revealed a circumscribed ischemic lesion within the edematous, slightly herniated temporomesial lobe within the immediate vicinity of the affected optic nerve. Thus, the clinical course and morphologic magnetic resonance imaging findings suggest the occurrence of pressure-induced posterior ischemic optic neuropathy due to microcirculatory compromise. Conclusion Although lesions of the second cranial nerve following subdural hematoma have been reported individually, their pathogenesis was preferentially proposed from autopsy studies. Here we discuss a dual, pressure-induced and secondarily ischemic pathomechanism on the base of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging diagnostics which may remain unconsidered by computed tomography.
    Keywords: Optic Nerve Diseases -- Risk Factors ; Optic Nerve Diseases -- Diagnosis ; Optic Nerve Diseases -- Care And Treatment ; Optic Nerve Diseases -- Patient Outcomes ; Optic Nerve Diseases -- Case Studies ; Subdural Hematoma -- Risk Factors ; Subdural Hematoma -- Diagnosis ; Subdural Hematoma -- Care And Treatment ; Subdural Hematoma -- Patient Outcomes ; Subdural Hematoma -- Case Studies ; Anticoagulants -- Usage ; Anticoagulants -- Health Aspects
    ISSN: 1752-1947
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Annals of Hematology, 2011, Vol.90(4), pp.473-475
    ISSN: 0939-5555
    E-ISSN: 1432-0584
    Source: Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Annals of Hematology, 21 July 2010, Vol.90(4), pp.473-475
    Description: Dear Editor, We report on two patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially presenting in 2007. Both patients were tested positive for the FLT3-ITD mutation and were therefore treated with the FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib (400 mg/day) after progress of AML following several protocols of conventional chemotherapy. Both patients responded with a significant reduction of peripheral blast counts after 10 to 17 days leading to hematological response for 12 and 14 weeks, respectively. At the time of relapse, molecular analysis investigating mutations of both tyrosine kinase domains by sequencing of each individual FLT3-ITD cDNA did not demonstrate any additional mutations. We therefore suggest that the secondary resistance to sorafenib is mediated by other mechanisms than the acquisition of secondary mutations of FLT3 in these patients. FLT3-ITD mutations represent the second most frequent molecular aberration in AML leading to a constitutive activity of the class III receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3. FLT3-ITD mutations can be found in 25–30% of all AML patients and are associated with a reduced disease-free survival and overall survival [1–3].
    Keywords: Medicine ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0939-5555
    E-ISSN: 1432-0584
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 2014, Vol.140(8), pp.1391-1397
    Description: Byline: Ulf Schnetzke (1), Peter Fix (3), Baerbel Spies-Weisshart (1), Karin Schrenk (1), Anita Glaser (2), Hans-Joerg Fricke (1), Paul Rosee (1), Andreas Hochhaus (1), Sebastian Scholl (1) Keywords: AML; Relapse; FLT3; Cyclophosphamide; Stem cell transplantation Abstract: Background Approximately, 70 % of adult patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) achieve a complete remission (CR) while 10--20 % of AML are refractory to induction chemotherapy. Furthermore, a significant proportion of AML patients in CR will relapse during or after consolidation treatment. There is no evidence for a standard salvage regimen and most centers use a combination of an anthracycline and cytarabine (AraC). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of two age-adjusted regimens containing AraC and cyclophosphamide applied for the treatment of relapsed or refractory AML. Patients and methods We retrospectively analyzed 60 patients (24 male, 36 female median age 56 years) with relapsed or refractory AML who were treated with a combination of AraC and cyclophosphamide monocentrically between October 2000 and January 2013. Two different protocols containing either high-dose (hAC) or intermediate-dose cytarabin (iAC) have been applied dependent on age and performance status. Results We demonstrate an overall response rate (CR + PR) induced by hAC and iAC of 56.7 %. Importantly, a complete remission rate (CR + CRp) of 52.2 % was found in patients who received the hAC regimen while only 8.8 % of patients achieved a CR following the iAC protocol (p 〈 0.001). The rate of refractory disease was 26.1 and 47.1 %, respectively. High-risk cytogenetics, i.e., a complex aberrant or monosomal karyotype had no effect on achievement of CR after hAC. In addition, there was no impact of activating FLT3 mutations on response to treatment according to the hAC regimen. In the cohort of patients treated with the iAC protocol, treatment-related mortality of 11.8 % within 60 days was observed but none of the patients who received the hAC regimen died within the first 2 months following chemotherapy. The toxicity profile was acceptable at both cytarabine dose levels. Importantly, 19 patients (82.6 %) of the hAC cohort underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) as consecutive treatment. Conclusion The hAC regimen represents a promising therapeutic approach to induce a second CR in younger patients with relapsed or refractory AML prior to HSCT without using anthracyclines. Author Affiliation: (1) Abteilung Hamatologie und Internistische Onkologie, Klinik fur Innere Medizin II, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747, Jena, Germany (2) Institut fur Humangenetik, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Jena, Germany (3) Abteilung Internistische Onkologie und Hamatologie, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 28/03/2014 Received Date: 12/03/2014 Accepted Date: 28/03/2014 Online Date: 12/04/2014 Article note: Ulf Schnetzke and Peter Fix have contributed equally to this work.
    Keywords: AML ; Relapse ; FLT3 ; Cyclophosphamide ; Stem cell transplantation
    ISSN: 0171-5216
    E-ISSN: 1432-1335
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of medical case reports, 22 January 2010, Vol.4, pp.19
    Description: Unilateral optic neuropathy is commonly due to a prechiasmatic affliction of the anterior visual pathway, while losses in visual hemifields result from the damage to brain hemispheres. Here we report the unusual case of a patient who suffered from acute optic neuropathy following hemispherical subdural hematoma. Although confirmed up to now only through necropsy studies, our case strongly suggests a local, microcirculatory deficit identified through magnetic resonance imaging in vivo. A 70-year-old Caucasian German who developed a massive left hemispheric subdural hematoma under oral anticoagulation presented with acute, severe visual impairment on his left eye, which was noticed after surgical decompression. Neurologic and ophthalmologic examinations indicated sinistral optic neuropathy with visual acuity reduced nearly to amaurosis. Ocular pathology such as vitreous body hemorrhage, papilledema, and central retinal artery occlusion were excluded. An orbital lesion was ruled out by means of orbital magnetic resonance imaging. However, cerebral diffusion-weighted imaging and T2 maps of magnetic resonance imaging revealed a circumscribed ischemic lesion within the edematous, slightly herniated temporomesial lobe within the immediate vicinity of the affected optic nerve. Thus, the clinical course and morphologic magnetic resonance imaging findings suggest the occurrence of pressure-induced posterior ischemic optic neuropathy due to microcirculatory compromise. Although lesions of the second cranial nerve following subdural hematoma have been reported individually, their pathogenesis was preferentially proposed from autopsy studies. Here we discuss a dual, pressure-induced and secondarily ischemic pathomechanism on the base of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging diagnostics which may remain unconsidered by computed tomography.
    Keywords: Case Report;
    E-ISSN: 1752-1947
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Annals of Hematology, 2011, Vol.90(7), pp.857-859
    Description: Byline: Ellen Ritter (1), Ralf A. Husain (2), Katrin Hinderhofer (4), Tino Prell (3), Hans-Jorg Fricke (1), Sebastian Scholl (1), Andreas Hochhaus (1), Paul La Rosee (1) Author Affiliation: (1) Abteilung Hamatologie und Onkologie, Klinik fur Innere Medizin II, Universitatsklinikum Jena, 07747, Jena, Germany (2) Klinik fur Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Jena, Germany (3) Hans-Berger-Klinik fur Neurologie, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Jena, Germany (4) Institut fur Humangenetik, Universitat Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 09/10/2010 Received Date: 06/10/2010 Accepted Date: 09/10/2010 Online Date: 09/11/2010
    Keywords: Lymphomas -- Drug Therapy ; Lymphomas -- Genetic Aspects ; Ornithine ; Cancer Treatment;
    ISSN: 0939-5555
    E-ISSN: 1432-0584
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  • 10
    In: British Journal of Haematology, October 2012, Vol.159(1), pp.67-77
    Description: The efficacy of bendamustine chlorambucil in a phase trial of previously untreated patients with inet stage chronic lymphocytic leukaemia () was re‐evaluated after a median observation time of 54 months in ay 2010. Overall survival () was analysed for the first time. At follow‐up, investigator‐assessed complete response () rate (21·0% vs 10·8%), median progression‐free survival (21·2 vs 8·8 months; 65 years, responders and non‐responders. However, patients with objective response or a experienced a significantly longer than non‐responders or those without a . Significantly more patients on chlorambucil progressed to second/further lines of treatment compared with those on bendamustine (78·3% vs 63·6%; =0·004). The benefits of bendamustine over chlorambucil were achieved without reducing quality of life. In conclusion, bendamustine is significantly more effective than chlorambucil in previously untreated patients, with the achievement of a or objective response appearing to prolong . Bendamustine should be considered as a preferred first‐line option over chlorambucil for patients ineligible for fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab.
    Keywords: Bendamustine ; Chlorambucil ; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia ; Complete Response ; Overall Survival
    ISSN: 0007-1048
    E-ISSN: 1365-2141
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