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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Biodiversity and Conservation, June, 2012, Vol.21(6), p.1359(6)
    Description: Byline: Spartaco Gippoliti (1) Keywords: Biodiversity convention; Zoos; Breeding facilities; Reintroductions Abstract: The role of ex situ activities for the conservation of biodiversity, and of zoos and aquaria in particular, is open to continuing debate. The present note highlights the conservation breeding potential of zoological gardens and aquaria in the European union, but it also recognises the lack of a convincing scientific and legal framework that encourages ex situ activities for 'exotic' species. If ex situ programmes are considered essential for global biodiversity conservation, the EU should not limit itself to regulating zoos through the zoo directive, but should actively promote and support their ex situ conservation activities. Author Affiliation: (1) Viale Liegi 48A, 00198, Roma, Italy Article History: Registration Date: 02/02/2012 Received Date: 28/10/2011 Accepted Date: 01/02/2012 Online Date: 11/02/2012
    Keywords: Zoos ; Biodiversity Conservation
    ISSN: 0960-3115
    E-ISSN: 15729710
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Biodiversity and Conservation, 2011, Vol.20(14), pp.3693-3700
    Description: Biodiversity hotspots are used widely to designate priority regions for conservation efforts. It is unknown, however, whether the current network of hotspots adequately represents globally threatened taxonomic diversity for whole plant and animal groups. We used a mammalian group traditionally neglected in terms of conservation efforts, the rodents, in order to test whether biodiversity hotspots match the current distribution of threatened taxa (genera and species). Significantly higher numbers of threatened rodent genera and species fell within biodiversity hotspots; nonetheless over 25% of the total threatened genera and species did not occur in any biodiversity hotspot. This was particularly true for the Australian region, where 100% of the threatened genera and species fell outside biodiversity hotspots, with many threatened taxa found in Papua-New Guinea. We suggest to officially including Papua New Guinea among biodiversity hotspots for rodents, and also the steppic/semidesert areas of central Asia.
    Keywords: Biodiversity hotspots ; Rodentia ; Conservation ; Papua New Guinea
    ISSN: 0960-3115
    E-ISSN: 1572-9710
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Primates, 2010, Vol.51(4), pp.291-297
    Description: Despite the uniqueness and importance of Theropithecus in palaeontological studies, little is known about the geographical and taxonomic differentiation in this genus, now restricted to the Ethiopian Highlands. Traditionally, the single living species Theropithecus gelada (Rüppell 1835) has been considered to comprise two subspecies: the nominate T. g. gelada in the northern highlands, and T. g. obscurus Heuglin 1863, from latitude 12° to 9°N in the south. Both the distributions and the physical characters of these two subspecies are poorly defined, and even in recent major taxonomic revisions, the validity of T. g. obscurus has been questioned. The history of gelada taxonomy and museum collections is reviewed here, and results are compared with the biogeography and major physical features of the Ethiopian Highlands. It is concluded that major gaps exist in our knowledge of the differentiation and distributions of Theropithecus populations. Following this literature review, a series of priority regions for taxonomic research and conservation are identified. These include the gathering of data on (1) geladas inhabiting the Wollo Region, from where obscurus was originally described; (2) the identity of geladas of the Tigray Region northeast of the Tacazzé River, and their current conservation status; (3) the identity of the Shewa population, usually assigned to obscurus; and (4) the identity and current status of geladas found northeast and south of Lake Tana, including Gojjam. ; Includes references ; p. 291-297.
    Keywords: Biogeography ; Conservation ; Gelada ; Subspecies
    ISSN: 0032-8332
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  • 4
    In: mammalia, 2012, Vol.76(3), pp.323-325
    Description: No abstract available.
    Keywords: Biodiversity ; Conservation ; Horn Of Africa ; Museum Data
    ISSN: 0025-1461
    E-ISSN: 1864-1547
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Rendiconti Lincei, 2014, Vol.25(3), pp.351-357
    Description: The twentieth century saw the decline of interest toward museum collections and an increased support to ‘experimental’ and ‘evolutionary’ biology, implicitly recognising the opposite nature of the ‘old’ museum-based taxonomy. With few exceptions, such as those of Florence and Verona, Italian museums after World War II were pushed at the border of scientific activity by the academic world and had to fight for their survival. Examples from the USA and elsewhere show the increased relevance of modern mammal collections to several fields of research. Despite an increased and welcomed attention to the value of historical collections, there is still scarce awareness of the need and relevance of maintaining and implementing mammal collections in museums as a valuable, long-term, source of data in the field of conservation biology, faunistic, taxonomy, molecular biology and health monitoring. In the present paper we suggest to create a network between mammalogists and a number of mammal collections, with one museum serving as focal point for a national mammal collection.
    Keywords: Integrative taxonomy ; Biodiversity ; Specimen-based systematics ; National collection
    ISSN: 2037-4631
    E-ISSN: 1720-0776
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Biodiversity and Conservation, 2012, Vol.21(7), pp.1755-1793
    Description: Comparing species checklists across countries can be important for determining the relative uniqueness of each country, which can be conveniently defined on the basis of the number of species occurring only in that country or, at most, in one of its neighboring countries. Production of accurate country checklists is complicated by the fact that, especially in scientifically neglected regions, the knowledge of the distribution of many species is unsatisfying. When distribution of a given species is insufficiently known, typically there may be apparent gaps in its distribution range. These species are defined here as ‘gap species’. In this paper, we analyze the country checklists for rodents and insectivores of the African continent with the aims of (i) identifying the countries having a higher taxonomic uniqueness; (ii) highlighting countries where more research is needed; (iii) producing a list of gap species; and (iv) determining the ecological correlates of being a gap species. For both mammal groups, the important countries because of their low numbers of shared species were D.R. Congo, Cameroon, Sudan, Kenya, Tanzania, and South Africa. The countries with highest percentages of endemic taxa were Kenya, South Africa, Somalia and Tanzania for insectivores, and Ethiopia and South Africa for rodents. The number of gap species per country was 0–5 for both insectivores and rodents, with the only exceptions of Togo (12) and Benin (15). Apart from Togo and Benin, the main gap countries for rodents were Nigeria, Chad, Gabon, Burundi, and Rwanda, and for insectivores were Niger and Chad. In both groups, the number of gap species per country was independent on the country area, and both range and body sizes did not influence the probability for a species to have distribution gaps. However, most gap species were tropical forest inhabitants. The biogeographic and conservation implications of these data are discussed.
    Keywords: Africa ; Insectivores ; Rodents ; Country prioritization ; Country lists of species ; Conservation ; Gap species
    ISSN: 0960-3115
    E-ISSN: 1572-9710
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Der Zoologische Garten, 2017, Vol.86(1-6), pp.102-107
    Description: The present paper reviews available data concerning the capture and exhibition of live Mediterranean monk seals in Italian zoos and other scientific institutions. Hopefully this may provide further data concerning monk seals management and on the extent of past human exploitation that may be valuable for the conservation of this unique species.
    Keywords: Captive Husbandry ; Italy ; Zoos ; Exploitation ; Zoology
    ISSN: 0044-5169
    E-ISSN: 1876-4312
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Etnográfica, 01 October 2016, pp.672-675
    Description: This paper discusses the importance of western influence and perceptions on the conservation of nonhuman primates and other biodiversity, and the need for an ethical approach to conservation that is centred in the involvement of the local population, a vision shared by Cláudia Sousa.
    Keywords: Biodiversity Conservation ; Primates ; Ethics ; Parks ; Local Culture ; Conservação Da Biodiversidade ; Primatas ; Ética ; Parques ; Cultura Local ; Anthropology
    ISSN: 0873-6561
    E-ISSN: 2182-2891
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Natural History Sciences, 01 August 2018, Vol.5(2)
    ISSN: 2385-0442
    E-ISSN: 2385-0922
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Der Zoologische Garten, 2014, Vol.83(4-6), pp.146-154
    Description: This paper reviews the history of African wild asses in the Giardino Zoologico of Rome, highlighting their relevance to taxonomy of (von Heuglin & Fitzinger, 1866). Specifically, it is demonstrated that the so-called Munich/Catskill stock of African wild ass originated from three animals imported in Rome from Eritrean Danakil in August 1932. Available evidence suggests that contrary to some recent statements, these ‘wild’ asses were not related to the Nubian wild ass and are better considered as the result of some intergradations between Somali wild asses and local Danakil donkeys.
    Keywords: Nubian Wild Ass ; Equidae ; Equus Africanus Africanus ; Eritrea ; Zoology
    ISSN: 0044-5169
    E-ISSN: 1876-4312
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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