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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: The American Political Science Review, 1 February 2013, Vol.107(1), pp.123-138
    Description: This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category.
    Keywords: Behavioral sciences -- Psychology -- Cognitive psychology ; Political science -- Political philosophy -- Political ideologies ; Law -- Jurisprudence -- Philosophy of law ; Law -- Jurisprudence -- Philosophy of law ; Economics -- Economic disciplines -- Socioeconomics ; Behavioral sciences -- Psychology -- Cognitive psychology ; Behavioral sciences -- Sociology -- Human societies ; Law -- Jurisprudence -- Philosophy of law ; Political science -- Government -- Government officials ; Law -- Administrative law -- Economic regulation
    ISSN: 00030554
    E-ISSN: 15375943
    Source: Archival Journals (JSTOR)
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  • 2
    In: American Anthropologist, June 2012, Vol.114(2), pp.378-378
    Keywords: Culture and Social Structure; Culture (Kinship, Forms of Social Organization, Social Cohesion & Integration, & Social Representations) ; Article;
    ISSN: 0002-7294
    E-ISSN: 1548-1433
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  • 3
    In: Journal of Management Studies, November 2011, Vol.48(7), pp.1662-1697
    Description: In 1993, Mats Alvesson published ‘Organizations as Rhetoric’. In his paper, Alvesson proposed that knowledge was ambiguous and that rhetoric was therefore critical to the construction and operation of institutions and organizations. Moreover, he argued that in such an ambiguous and thus rhetorical world, knowledge operated as an institutionalized myth and rationality surrogate. Alvesson's insights helped inspire and initiate one of the most promising and growing areas of institutional research: rhetorical institutionalism. Rhetorical institutionalism is the deployment of linguistic approaches in general and rhetorical insights in particular to explain how institutions both constrain and enable agency. In this paper, we trace these original insights and discuss the benefits of continuing the integration of rhetorical ideas in institutional research. In addition, we propose and develop a rhetorical model of institutionalism that can spearhead research and conclude with some direct suggestions for future research.
    Keywords: Organizational Analysis ; Knowledge ; Rationality ; Rhetoric ; Institutionalism ; Language ; Agency ; Structural Analysis ; Sociology;
    ISSN: 0022-2380
    E-ISSN: 1467-6486
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  • 4
    In: Tempo, 2012, Vol.66(259), pp.15-23
    Description: Abstract As the first systematic 12-tone composition, the Petrarch movement from Schoenberg's Serenade has been associated with ‘newness’. Yet it has conservative features. Medieval notions of isomelody and isorhythm, as well as Renaissance concepts of paralleling a poem's prosody and emotional content, are here. Moreover, 12-tone composition itself is an evolution of ‘Chromatic Completion’ – a technique already flourishing in Haydn and Mozart. Ultimately, what matters most is Schoenberg's understanding of the aesthetics of love. To appreciate this, the essay makes use of the philosophy of Aesthetic Realism, founded by the great American poet and scholar Eli Siegel. Beauty, he taught, is ‘a making one of opposites, and the making one of opposites is what we are going after in ourselves’. And love, he explained, has an aesthetic basis: it is ‘proud need’. This essay indicates technical ways in which Schoenberg illustrates the truth of these concepts.
    Keywords: Schoenberg, Arnold ; Aesthetics ; Atonal Music ; Composers ; Love ; Music Analysis ; Siegel, Eli;
    ISSN: 0040-2982
    E-ISSN: 1478-2286
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 14 July 2015, Vol.112(28), pp.8702-7
    Description: Under standard laboratory conditions of rectangular light/dark cycles and constant warm temperature, Drosophila melanogaster show bursts of morning (M) and evening (E) locomotor activity and a "siesta" in the middle of the day. These M and E components have been critical for developing the neuronal dual oscillator model in which clock gene expression in key cells generates the circadian phenotype. However, under natural European summer conditions of cycling temperature and light intensity, an additional prominent afternoon (A) component that replaces the siesta is observed. This component has been described as an "artifact" of the TriKinetics locomotor monitoring system that is used by many circadian laboratories world wide. Using video recordings, we show that the A component is not an artifact, neither in the glass tubes used in TriKinetics monitors nor in open-field arenas. By studying various mutants in the visual and peripheral and internal thermo-sensitive pathways, we reveal that the M component is predominantly dependent on visual input, whereas the A component requires the internal thermo-sensitive channel transient receptor potential A1 (TrpA1). Knockdown of TrpA1 in different neuronal groups reveals that the reported expression of TrpA1 in clock neurons is unlikely to be involved in generating the summer locomotor profile, suggesting that other TrpA1 neurons are responsible for the A component. Studies of circadian rhythms under seminatural conditions therefore provide additional insights into the molecular basis of circadian entrainment that would otherwise be lost under the usual standard laboratory protocols.
    Keywords: Drosophila ; Afternoon ; Behavior ; Circadian ; Locomotor ; Circadian Rhythm ; Drosophila -- Physiology ; Drosophila Proteins -- Physiology ; Trpc Cation Channels -- Physiology
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 21 February 2017, Vol.114(8), pp.1970-1975
    Description: Stern has criticized a body of work from several groups that have independently studied the so-called "Kyriacou and Hall" courtship song rhythms of male claiming that these ultradian ∼60-s cycles in the interpulse interval (IPI) are statistical artifacts that are not modulated by mutations at the () locus [Stern DL (2014) 12:38]. We have scrutinized Stern's raw data and observe that his automated song pulse-detection method identifies only ∼50% of the IPIs found by manual (visual and acoustic) monitoring. This critical error is further compounded by Stern's use of recordings with very little song, the large majority of which do not meet the minimal song intensity criteria which Kyriacou and Hall used in their studies. Consequently most of Stern's recordings only contribute noise to the analyses. Of the data presented by Stern, only and a small fraction of wild-type males sing vigorously, so we limited our reanalyses to these genotypes. We manually reexamined Stern's raw song recordings and analyzed IPI rhythms using several independent time-series analyses. We observe that songs show significantly longer song periods than wild-type songs, with values for both genotypes close to those found in previous studies. These dependent differences disappear when the song data are randomized. We conclude that Stern's negative findings are artifacts of his inadequate pulse-detection methodology coupled to his use of low-intensity courtship song records.
    Keywords: Drosophila ; Courtship Song ; Cycles ; Interpulse Interval ; Period Gene ; Courtship ; Drosophila Proteins -- Genetics ; Drosophila Melanogaster -- Physiology ; Period Circadian Proteins -- Genetics ; Reproduction -- Physiology ; Vocalization, Animal -- Physiology
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization
    Description: Abstract Theorem 2 of the paper is incorrect. We are grateful to Eran Shmaya and Leeat Yariv, who pointed out the error to us and provided a counterexample. Author Affiliation: (a) Pennsylvania State University, United States (b) University of Bristol, United Kingdom * Corresponding author. Byline: Edward J. Green [eug2@psu.edu] (*,a), In-Uck Park [i.park@bristol.ac.uk] (b)
    Keywords: Business
    ISSN: 0167-2681
    E-ISSN: 1879-1751
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  • 8
    In: Nature, 2017, Vol.550(7675), p.179
    Description: Prognosticators are typically wrong about which technologies - or, more importantly, which applications - will be the most disruptive. We would probably fare no better in predicting the future of DNA sequencing. So instead, we offer a framework for thinking about it. Our central message is that trends...
    Keywords: Research ; Deoxyribonucleic Acid–DNA ; Researchers ; DNA Sequencing ; Genomes ; Datasets ; Gene Sequencing ; Deoxyribonucleic Acid–DNA;
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Nature, 04 April 2012, Vol.484(7394), pp.371-5
    Description: Circadian clocks have evolved to synchronize physiology, metabolism and behaviour to the 24-h geophysical cycles of the Earth. Drosophila melanogaster's rhythmic locomotor behaviour provides the main phenotype for the identification of higher eukaryotic clock genes. Under laboratory light-dark cycles, flies show enhanced activity before lights on and off signals, and these anticipatory responses have defined the neuronal sites of the corresponding morning (M) and evening (E) oscillators. However, the natural environment provides much richer cycling environmental stimuli than the laboratory, so we sought to examine fly locomotor rhythms in the wild. Here we show that several key laboratory-based assumptions about circadian behaviour are not supported by natural observations. These include the anticipation of light transitions, the midday 'siesta', the fly's crepuscular activity, its nocturnal behaviour under moonlight, and the dominance of light stimuli over temperature. We also observe a third major locomotor component in addition to M and E, which we term 'A' (afternoon). Furthermore, we show that these natural rhythm phenotypes can be observed in the laboratory by using realistic temperature and light cycle simulations. Our results suggest that a comprehensive re-examination of circadian behaviour and its molecular readouts under simulated natural conditions will provide a more authentic interpretation of the adaptive significance of this important rhythmic phenotype. Such studies should also help to clarify the underlying molecular and neuroanatomical substrates of the clock under natural protocols.
    Keywords: Environment ; Circadian Rhythm -- Physiology ; Drosophila Melanogaster -- Physiology
    ISSN: 00280836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 10
    In: Popular Music History, 06/23/2011, Vol.5(1)
    Keywords: Musicology ; Parapsychology & Occult Sciences;
    ISSN: 17407133
    E-ISSN: 17431646
    Source: CrossRef
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