Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, Dec 15, 2013, Vol.310, p.110(10)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.08.006 Byline: Michael Goisser, Ulrich Zang, Egbert Matzner, Werner Borken, Karl-Heinz Haberle, Rainer Matyssek Abstract: acents Response of juvenile European beech upon transplant to heterogeneous light and water availability. acents Plant response was examined along the gradients of light and water availability. acents High light acclimation exacerbated productivity decline under drought. acents Progressive acclimation to shade and drought mitigated productivity decline within the study period. Article History: Received 18 April 2013; Revised 4 August 2013; Accepted 5 August 2013
    Keywords: Water ; Industrial Productivity
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, Nov 15, 2013, Vol.308, p.188(10)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.07.048 Byline: Julia A. Sohn, Timo Gebhardt, Christian Ammer, Jurgen Bauhus, Karl-Heinz Haberle, Rainer Matyssek, Thorsten E.E. Grams Abstract: acents We studied the effect of thinning on drought tolerance in Norway spruce at two sites. acents Changes in wood stable isotopes and growth during/after two droughts were analyzed. acents Effects of thinning on drought response differed with time span since thinning. acents Growth reduction during drought was lower in open stand but only if thinned recently. acents Thinning improved the growth recovery after drought at both short- and long-term. Article History: Received 4 June 2013; Revised 25 July 2013; Accepted 25 July 2013
    Keywords: Droughts -- Physiological Aspects
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 15 December 2013, Vol.310, pp.110-119
    Description: Climate models predict increasing frequency and intensity of summer drought events for Central Europe. In a field experiment, we investigated the response of young beech ( L.) to extreme and repeated summer drought and the modulation of drought response patterns along the natural gradient of light availability at the study site. In autumn 2008, two-year-old, nursery derived beech – as used for forest conversion practices – was planted under a Norway spruce stand primarily opened through winter storm. Precipitation was manipulated in the growing seasons of 2009 through 2011, inducing a pronounced gradient of water availability. Individual drought-stress doses (DSD) and light doses (LD) were calculated for each beech sapling during the three growing seasons. Plant growth, CO -assimilation rate and stomatal conductance were reduced with increasing drought stress, but facilitated by increasing light availability. Progressive acclimation to water and light limitation during the three years of the experiment led to a decreased drought and shade sensitivity of diameter growth. Water-use efficiency, root/shoot ratio and rooting depth, were increased with decreasing water availability. Mean fine root diameter and specific fine root length correlated positively with both DSD and LD. Proceeding low-light acclimation was indicated by progressively increasing specific leaf area and reduced leaf dark-respiration. Present results suggest that nursery-induced high-light acclimation of the beech saplings, exacerbated light limitation upon transplant and hence productivity decline under co-occurring water limitation.
    Keywords: European Beech ; Drought ; Light ; Restoration ; Acclimation ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 15 November 2013, Vol.308, pp.188-197
    Description: We hypothesize that reductions in stand density through thinning improve the recovery of radial stem growth in Norway spruce trees ( ) from severe drought. However, thinning may not lead to higher relative radial growth during drought. Annual stem growth and stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in early- and latewood were assessed in trees from heavily thinned (HT), moderately thinned (MT) and un-thinned control stands at two sites in southern Germany. Physiological performance of trees as inferred from stable isotope analysis was used to interpret annual stem growth in response to the drought events in 1976 and 2003. Only in recently thinned stands, trees maintained growth probably through higher soil water availability during the drought year when compared to controls. In contrast, thinning improved the growth recovery in the years following the drought irrespective of the time span between thinning and drought. We conclude that thinning improves drought recovery response in the short and long term and should be considered as an effective management strategy to increase drought tolerance of Norway spruce stands.
    Keywords: Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes ; Radial Growth ; Water Stress ; Tree Rings ; Resistance ; Recovery ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, January 2015, Vol.196, pp.527-533
    Description: Stomata tend to narrow under ozone (O ) impact, leading to limitation of stomatal O influx. Here, we review stomatal response under recently conducted free-air O exposure experiments on two species of the same tree genus: at Kranzberg Forest (Germany) and at Sapporo Experimental Forest (Japan). Both beeches exhibited reduction in stomatal conductance ( ) by 10–20% under experimentally enhanced O regimes throughout the summer relative to ambient-air controls. Stomatal narrowing occurred, in early summer, in the absence of reduced carboxylation capacity of Rubisco, although photosynthetic net CO uptake rate temporarily reflected restriction to some minor extent. Observed stomatal narrowing was, however, diminished in autumn, suggesting gradual loss of stomatal regulation by O . Monotonic decline in with cumulative O exposure or flux in current modeling concepts appear to be unrealistic in beech. Stomata narrow under ozone stress in up-growing (beyond sapling stage) and maturing trees of Siebold's and European beech, respectively.
    Keywords: Tropospheric Ozone ; European Beech (Fagus Sylvatica L.) ; Siebold'S Beech (Fagus Crenata) ; Stomatal Narrowing ; O3 FACE ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Environmental pollution, 2010, Vol.158, pp.1071-1078
    Description: The effects of experimentally elevated O3 on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and δ13C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with contrasting rainfall patterns. During humid 2002, soil respiration rate was enhanced under elevated O3 under beech and spruce, and was related to O3-stimulated fine-root production only in beech. During dry 2003, the stimulating effect of O3 on soil respiration rate vanished under spruce, which was correlated with decreased fine-root production in spruce under drought, irrespective of the O3 regime. δ13C signature of newly formed fine-roots was consistent with the differing gs of beech and spruce, and indicated stomatal limitation by O3 in beech and by drought in spruce. Our study showed that drought can override the stimulating O3 effects on fine-root dynamics and soil respiration in mature beech and spruce forests. Drought has the capacity to override the stimulating ozone effect on soil respiration in adult European beech/Norway spruce forest. ; In the special issue: Facing the Future: Evidence from Joint AspenFACE, SoyFACE and SFB 607 Meeting / edited by Kevin Percy, John King and Rainer Matyssek. Paper presented at meeting held April 2-4, 2008, Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Includes references ; p. 1071-1078.
    Keywords: Soil Water Content ; Air Temperature ; Root Growth ; Fagus Sylvatica ; Forest Trees ; Elevated Atmospheric Gases ; Air Pollution ; Drought ; Soil Temperature ; Soil Respiration ; Ozone ; Humidity ; Climatic Factors ; Picea Abies
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, 2010, Vol.158(4), pp.1071-1078
    Description: The effects of experimentally elevated O on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with contrasting rainfall patterns. During humid 2002, soil respiration rate was enhanced under elevated O under beech and spruce, and was related to O -stimulated fine-root production only in beech. During dry 2003, the stimulating effect of O on soil respiration rate vanished under spruce, which was correlated with decreased fine-root production in spruce under drought, irrespective of the O regime. C signature of newly formed fine-roots was consistent with the differing of beech and spruce, and indicated stomatal limitation by O in beech and by drought in spruce. Our study showed that drought can override the stimulating O effects on fine-root dynamics and soil respiration in mature beech and spruce forests. Drought has the capacity to override the stimulating ozone effect on soil respiration in adult European beech/Norway spruce forest.
    Keywords: Fagus Sylvatica ; Picea Abies ; Soil Respiration ; Fine-Root Production ; Δ13c ; Ozone Fumigation ; Drought ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    In: New Phytologist, October 2012, Vol.196(1), pp.162-172
    Description: • Increasing atmospheric concentrations of phytotoxic ozone (O3) can constrain growth and carbon sink strength of forest trees, potentially exacerbating global radiative forcing. Despite progress in the conceptual understanding of the impact of O3 on plants, it is still difficult to detect response patterns at the leaf level. • Here, we employed principal component analysis (PCA) to analyse a database containing physiological leaf‐level parameters of 60‐yr‐old Fagus sylvatica (European beech) trees. Data were collected over two climatically contrasting years under ambient and twice‐ambient O3 regimes in a free‐air forest environment. • The first principal component (PC1) of the PCA was consistently responsive to O3 and crown position within the trees over both years. Only a few of the original parameters showed an O3 effect. PC1 was related to parameters indicative of oxidative stress signalling and changes in carbohydrate metabolism. PC1 correlated with cumulative O3 uptake over preceding days. • PC1 represents an O3‐responsive multivariate pattern detectable in the absence of consistently measurable O3 effects on individual leaf‐level parameters. An underlying effect of O3 on physiological processes is indicated, providing experimental confirmation of theoretical O3 response patterns suggested previously.
    Keywords: Cumulative O 3 Uptake ; Fagus Sylvatica European Beech ; Multivariate Analysis ; Ozone O 3 ; Principal Component Analysis Pca
    ISSN: 0028-646X
    E-ISSN: 1469-8137
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Environmental pollution, 2012, Vol.166, pp.108-115
    Description: The hypothesis was tested that O₃-induced changes in leaf-level photosynthetic parameters have the capacity of limiting the seasonal photosynthetic carbon gain of adult beech trees. To this end, canopy-level photosynthetic carbon gain and respiratory carbon loss were assessed in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) by using a physiologically based model, integrating environmental and photosynthetic parameters. The latter were derived from leaves at various canopy positions under the ambient O₃ regime, as prevailing at the forest site (control), or under an experimental twice-ambient O₃ regime (elevated O₃), as released through a free-air canopy O₃ fumigation system. Gross carbon gain at the canopy-level declined by 1.7%, while respiratory carbon loss increased by 4.6% under elevated O₃. As this outcome only partly accounts for the decline in stem growth, O₃-induced changes in allocation are referred to and discussed as crucial in quantitatively linking carbon gain with stem growth. ; p. 108-115.
    Keywords: Models ; Forests ; Photosynthesis ; Ozone ; Canopy ; Fumigation ; Carbon ; Fagus Sylvatica Subsp. Sylvatica ; Adults ; Trees ; Leaves ; Stem Elongation
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, July 2012, Vol.166, pp.108-115
    Description: The hypothesis was tested that O -induced changes in leaf-level photosynthetic parameters have the capacity of limiting the seasonal photosynthetic carbon gain of adult beech trees. To this end, canopy-level photosynthetic carbon gain and respiratory carbon loss were assessed in European beech ( ) by using a physiologically based model, integrating environmental and photosynthetic parameters. The latter were derived from leaves at various canopy positions under the ambient O regime, as prevailing at the forest site (control), or under an experimental twice-ambient O regime (elevated O ), as released through a free-air canopy O fumigation system. Gross carbon gain at the canopy-level declined by 1.7%, while respiratory carbon loss increased by 4.6% under elevated O . As this outcome only partly accounts for the decline in stem growth, O -induced changes in allocation are referred to and discussed as crucial in quantitatively linking carbon gain with stem growth. ► We model O -induced changes in the photosynthetic carbon gain of adult beech trees. ► Elevated O decreases gross carbon gain but increases respiratory carbon loss. ► Reduction in net carbon gain only partly accounts for the decline in stem growth. ► O effects on the whole-tree allocation is crucial in addition to carbon gains. Reduction in net carbon gain at the canopy level only partly accounts for the decline in stem growth under elevated ozone.
    Keywords: Adult Forest Trees ; Long-Term Free-Air O3 Fumigation ; Fagus Sylvatica ; Light Gradient ; Seasonal Carbon Balance ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages