Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Acta Biomaterialia, 2012, Vol.8(2), pp.659-666
    Description: Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are multifunctional components of the extracellular matrix and are involved in the regulation of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. The effects of GAG are mediated in general by their interactions with cations and water, and in particular by their binding to growth factors. The aim of this study was to generate artificial extracellular matrices (aECM) containing collagen I and hyaluronan sulfate (HyaS), which are capable of adsorbing and releasing transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and to promote collagen synthesis of cultured human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). For the preparation of aECM, monosulfated Hya (HyaS1) or trisulfated Hya (HyaS3) were used; the natural chondroitin-4-sulfate was used as a control. As applied for the in vitro experiments, the resulting matrices were composed of 93–98% collagen I and 2–7% GAG derivative. Adsorption of TGF-β1 to the aECM and release from the aECM was dependent on the degree of sulfation of hyaluronan. Collagen synthesis of hMSC was promoted only by aECM with adsorbed TGF-β1; the bare aECM had a slightly inhibitory effect on collagen synthesis. The promoting effect did not correlate either to the amount of adsorbed TGF-β1 nor to the release of TGF-β1, indicating that the correct presentation of TGF-β1 to the cells might be critical. The results indicate that sulfated hyaluronan-containing aECM have the potential to control both the adsorption and release of TGF-β1, and thereby promote collagen synthesis of hMSC. Thus, these aECM might be a useful tool for different tissue-engineering applications to enhance bone formation when used for biomaterial coating.
    Keywords: Artificial Extracellular Matrix ; Collagen Synthesis ; Glycosaminoglycans ; Mesenchymal Stromal Cells ; Sulfated Hyaluronan ; Engineering
    ISSN: 1742-7061
    E-ISSN: 1878-7568
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2015, Vol.407(16), p.4555(11)
    Description: The detection and localization of polymer-based nanoparticles in human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSC) by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is reported as an example for the mass spectrometry imaging of organic nanoparticles in cell environments. Polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) nanoparticles (NP) made of polyethylenimine (PEI) and cellulose sulfate (CS), which were developed as potential drug carrier and coatings for implant materials, were chosen for the imaging experiments. To investigate whether the PEI/CS-NP were taken up by the hBMSC ToF-SIMS measurements on cross sections of the cells and depth profiling of whole, single cells were carried out. Since the mass spectra of the PEI/CS nanoparticles are close to the mass spectra of the cells principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to get specific masses of the PEI/CS-NP. Mass fragments originating from the NP compounds especially from cellulose sulfate could be used to unequivocally detect and image the PEI/CS-NP inside the hBMSC. The findings were confirmed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00216-015-8647-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
    Keywords: Polyelectrolytes – Analysis ; Nanoparticles – Chemical Properties ; Nanoparticles – Research ; Bone Marrow – Physiological Aspects ; Bone Marrow – Research
    ISSN: 1618-2642
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    In: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, September 2014, Vol.115(9), pp.1561-1571
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jcb.24814/abstract Byline: Ute Hempel, Claudia Matthaus, Carolin Preissler, Stephanie Moller, Vera Hintze, Peter Dieter ABSTRACT Bone healing has been described to be most efficient if the early inflammatory phase is resolved timely. When the inflammation elevates or is permanently established, bone healing becomes impaired and, moreover, bone destruction often takes place. Systemic disorders such as diabetes and bone diseases like arthritis and osteoporosis are associated with sustained inflammation and delayed bone healing. One goal of biomaterial research is the development of materials/surface modifications which support the healing process by inhibiting the inflammatory bone erosion and suppressing pro-inflammatory mediators and by that promoting the bone repair process. In the present study, the influence of artificial extracellular matrices (aECM) on the interleukin (IL)-1[beta]-induced pro-inflammatory response of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) was studied. hMSC cultured on aECM composed of collagen I and high-sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derivatives did not secrete IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and prostaglandin E.sub.2 in response to IL-1[beta]. The activation and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor I*Bp65 induced by IL-1[beta], tumor necrosis factor-[alpha] or lipopolysaccharide was abrogated. Furthermore, these aECM promoted the osteogenic differentiation of hMSC as determined by an increased activity of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP); however, the aECM had no effect on the IL-1[beta]-induced TNAP activity. These data suggest that aECM with high-sulfated GAG derivatives suppress the formation of pro-inflammatory mediators and simultaneously promote the osteogenic differentiation of hMSC. Therefore, these aECM might offer an interesting approach as material/surface modification supporting the bone healing process. J. Cell. Biochem. 115: 1561-1571, 2014. [c] 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Article Note: Current address of Claudia Matthaus is Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine, Developmental Neurobiology, Robert-Rossle-Str. 10, 13092 Berlin, Germany.
    Keywords: Extracellular Matrix ; Glycosaminoglycans ; Inflammation ; Mesenchymal Stromal Cells ; Osteogenic Differentiation ; Prostaglandins
    ISSN: 0730-2312
    E-ISSN: 1097-4644
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2015, Vol.407(16), pp.4555-4565
    Description: The detection and localization of polymer-based nanoparticles in human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSC) by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF–SIMS) is reported as an example for the mass spectrometry imaging of organic nanoparticles in cell environments. Polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) nanoparticles (NP) made of polyethylenimine (PEI) and cellulose sulfate (CS), which were developed as potential drug carrier and coatings for implant materials, were chosen for the imaging experiments. To investigate whether the PEI/CS–NP were taken up by the hBMSC ToF–SIMS measurements on cross sections of the cells and depth profiling of whole, single cells were carried out. Since the mass spectra of the PEI/CS nanoparticles are close to the mass spectra of the cells principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to get specific masses of the PEI/CS–NP. Mass fragments originating from the NP compounds especially from cellulose sulfate could be used to unequivocally detect and image the PEI/CS–NP inside the hBMSC. The findings were confirmed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Graphical Abstract During ToF-SIMS analysis Bi3 + primary ions hit the sample surface and so called secondary ions (SI) are emitted and detected in the mass analyser. Exemplary mass images of cross sections of human mesenchymal stromal cells (red; m/z = 86.1 u) cultured with organic nanoparticles (green; m/z = 143.0 u) were obtained
    Keywords: Mass spectrometry imaging ; Organic nanoparticles ; Single cell analysis ; ToF–SIMS ; Human bone marrow-derived stromal cells ; Internalization
    ISSN: 1618-2642
    E-ISSN: 1618-2650
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering, March, 2014, Vol.7(1), p.155(10)
    Description: Byline: Marion Mai (1), Ute Hempel (1), Michael C. Hacker (2), Peter Dieter (1) Keywords: Substrate flexibility; Synthetic extracellular matrix; PEG; Gelatin; Heparin Abstract: The biological, chemical, and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are important for adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Scaffolds prepared for tissue engineering approaches should imitate the properties of the native ECM of the target tissue. Here, we used the synthetic hydrogel HyStem[TM]-HP with different elasticity as a substrate for human bone marrow derived MSC (hBMMSC) and determined the influence of elasticity on morphology, adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of the cells. hBMMSC cultured on HyStem[TM]-HP with a crosslinking of 1.6% (low elasticity) were well-spread, revealed an organized actin cytoskeleton and many focal adhesion (FA) contacts in comparison cells cultured on HyStem[TM]-HP with a crosslinking of 0.1% (high elasticity) showed less spreading, less FAs, and a less organized actin cytoskeleton. Following osteogenic differentiation markers, like the activity of tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase, bsp II expression, and calcium accumulation were more pronounced on HyStem[TM]-HP 1.6% hydrogels compared to HyStem[TM]-HP 0.1%. These findings indicate that osteogenic differentiation of hBMMSC is better promoted by HyStem[TM]-HP with low elasticity and might therefore be a useful substrate for bone tissue engineering. Author Affiliation: (1) Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Fiedlerstrasse 42, 01307, Dresden, Germany (2) Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Leipzig, Eilenburger Strasse 15a, 04317, Leipzig, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 28/10/2013 Received Date: 08/04/2013 Accepted Date: 27/10/2013 Online Date: 02/11/2013 Article note: Associate Editor Chwee Teck Lim oversaw the review of this article. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi: 10.1007/s12195-013-0314-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
    Keywords: Tissue Engineering -- Analysis ; Muscle Proteins -- Analysis ; Polymer Crosslinking -- Analysis ; Computer Industry -- Analysis ; Drugstores -- Analysis
    ISSN: 1865-5025
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Prostaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators, 2010, Vol.92(1), pp.8-12
    Description: The present study examines the effect of chondroitin-4-sulfate (C4S) on the immediate (non-inflammatory conditions) and the delayed (inflammatory conditions) prostaglandin E (PGE ) release from rat calvarial osteoblasts. An immediate low release of PGE was induced by PAF, phorbol ester and arachidonic acid but not by IL1β, TNF-α and LPS whereas a delayed high release of PGE was induced by the inflammatory agents IL1β, TNF-α and LPS but not by PAF, phorbol ester and arachidonic acid. C4S had no effect on the immediate PGE release but inhibited the delayed release of PGE . IL1β, TNF-α and LPS enhanced the expression of COX-2 and mPGES1 whereas phorbol ester enhanced COX-2 expression only. PAF and arachidonic acid had no effect on the expression of COX-2 and mPGES1. C4S inhibited the enhanced expression of COX-2 and mPGES1 but had no effect on the IL1β-induced decrease of I-κBα and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. These results indicate that the beneficial effects of C4S in bone inflammatory diseases might be due to a specific inhibition of the delayed high PGE release from osteoblasts.
    Keywords: Prostaglandin E 2 ; Glycosaminoglycans ; Chondroitin-4-Sulfate ; Osteoblast ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 1098-8823
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Biomacromolecules, 10 October 2016, Vol.17(10), pp.3252-3261
    Description: Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) modulate cellular processes via their interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We revealed a direct binding of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3) to the endocytic receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1) clusters II and IV using surface plasmon resonance. Sulfated hyaluronan (sHA) and chondroitin sulfate (sCS) derivatives interfered with TIMP-3/LRP-1 complex formation in a sulfation-dependent manner stronger than heparin. Electrostatic potential calculations suggested a competition between negatively charged GAGs and highly negatively charged complement-like domains of LRP-1 for the binding to a positively charged area of TIMP-3 as an underlying mechanism. In vitro studies revealed increased amounts of pericellular TIMP-3 in the presence of sHA as a consequence of the blocked protein uptake. GAG derivatives as part of biomaterials might post-translationally modulate TIMP-3 levels stronger than native GAGs, thus exhibiting catabolic effects on the ECM, which could prevent extensive pathological matrix degradation and promote wound healing.
    Keywords: Glycosaminoglycans -- Administration & Dosage ; Hyaluronic Acid -- Administration & Dosage ; Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 -- Biosynthesis ; Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-3 -- Biosynthesis
    ISSN: 15257797
    E-ISSN: 1526-4602
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids (PLEFA), March 2015, Vol.94, pp.91-98
    Description: The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex) is a mandatory additive to induce osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) in vitro; however it is also known to promote the pathogenesis of osteoporotic bone disease in vivo. In this study human (h)BMSC were cultured in osteogenic medium containing β-glycerophosphate and ascorbate (OM) and in OM containing dex (OM/D). It was seen that dex induced in human (h)BMSC both, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Dex reveals its anti-inflammatory effect by reducing endogenous prostaglandin E (PGE ) formation and by suppressing the inducible enzymes cyclooxygenase 2 and microsomal PGE synthase 1. It was further seen that dex enhanced the expression of prostaglandin receptors, mainly EP2 and EP4 receptor subtypes. We thus hypothesized that dex enforces the susceptibility of hBMSC to respond to exogenous PGE . Permanent exposure of hBMSC which were cultured in OM/D to PGE , decreased osteogenic and increased adipogenic differentiation markers. The effects of PGE were preferentially mediated by receptor subtypes EP2 and EP4; EP1 was partially involved in pro-adipogenic effects, and EP3 was partially involved in anti-osteogenic effects. These results suggest that dex suppresses the formation of endogenous PGE but also enables hBMSC to respond to PGE due to the induction of PGE receptors EP2 and EP4. PGE then shifts in hBMSC the balance from osteogenic to adipogenic differentiation.
    Keywords: Adipogenic Differentiation ; Dexamethasone ; Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells ; Inflammation ; Prostaglandin E2 ; Osteogenic Differentiation ; Medicine ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0952-3278
    E-ISSN: 1532-2823
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids (PLEFA), August 2016, Vol.111, pp.1-7
    Description: Osteoclasts are large bone-resorbing cells of hematopoietic origin. Their main function is to dissolve the inorganic component hydroxyapatite and to degrade the organic bone matrix. Prostaglandin E (PGE ) indirectly affects osteoclasts by stimulating osteoblasts to release factors that influence osteoclast activity. The direct effect of PGE on osteoclasts is still controversial. To study the influence of PGE on osteoclast activity, human peripheral blood monocytes (hPBMC) and mouse RAW264.7 cells were cultured on osteoblast-derived extracellular matrix. hPBMC and RAW264.7 cells were differentiated by the addition of macrophage colony-stimulation factor and receptor activator of NFκB ligand and treated with PGE before and after differentiation induction. The pit area, an indicator of resorption activity, and the activity of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were dose-dependently inhibited when PGE was present , whereas the resorption activity remained unchanged when the cells were exposed to PGE from day 4 of culture. These results lead to the conclusion that PGE treatment inhibits only the differentiation of precursor osteoclasts whereas differentiated osteoclasts are not affected.
    Keywords: Medicine ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0952-3278
    E-ISSN: 1532-2823
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: International journal of nanomedicine, 2014, Vol.9, pp.2205-15
    Description: Implant loosening or deficient osseointegration is a major problem in patients with systemic bone diseases (eg, osteoporosis). For this reason, the stimulation of the regional cell population by local and sustained drug delivery at the bone/implant interface to induce the formation of a mechanical stable bone is promising. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of polymer-based nanoparticles with human bone marrow-derived cells, considering nanoparticles' composition and surface net charge. Polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (PECNPs) composed of the polycations poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI), poly(L-lysine) (PLL), or (N,N-diethylamino)ethyldextran (DEAE) in combination with the polyanions dextran sulfate (DS) or cellulose sulfate (CS) were prepared. PECNPs' physicochemical properties (size, net charge) were characterized by dynamic light scattering and particle charge detector measurements. Biocompatibility was investigated using human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on immobilized PECNP films (5-50 nmol·cm(-2)) by analysis for metabolic activity of hMSCs in dependence of PECNP surface concentration by MTS (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-5-[3-carboxymethoxyphenyl]-2-[4-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt) assay, as well as cell morphology (phase contrast microscopy). PECNPs ranging between ~50 nm and 150 nm were prepared. By varying the ratio of polycations and polyanions, PECNPs with a slightly positive (PEC(+)NP) or negative (PEC(-)NP) net charge were obtained. The PECNP composition significantly affected cell morphology and metabolic activity, whereas the net charge had a negligible influence. Therefore, we classified PECNPs into "variant systems" featuring a significant dose dependency of metabolic activity (DEAE/CS, PEI/DS) and "invariant systems" lacking such a dependency (DEAE/DS, PEI/CS). Immunofluorescence imaging of fluorescein isothiocyanate isomer I (FITC)-labeled PECNPs suggested internalization into hMSCs remaining stable for 8 days. Our study demonstrated that PECNP composition affects hMSC behavior. In particular, the PEI/CS system showed biocompatibility in a wide concentration range, representing a suitable system for local drug delivery from PECNP-functionalized bone substitute materials.
    Keywords: Mts Assay ; Biocompatibility ; Mesenchymal Stromal Cells ; Morphology ; Polyelectrolyte Complex Nanoparticles ; Electrolytes -- Pharmacology ; Mesenchymal Stem Cells -- Cytology ; Nanoparticles -- Administration & Dosage ; Polymers -- Pharmacology
    E-ISSN: 1178-2013
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages