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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    In: British Journal of Haematology, May 2013, Vol.161(3), pp.302-302
    Description: Byline: Georgia Metzgeroth, Sven Schneider, Wolf-Karsten Hofmann, Jan Hastka ***** No abstract is available for this article. ***** Author Affiliation:
    Keywords: B-Lymphocytes -- Ultrastructure ; Immunoglobulin M -- Blood ; Inclusion Bodies -- Ultrastructure ; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell -- Blood ; Neoplasm Proteins -- Blood;
    ISSN: 0007-1048
    E-ISSN: 1365-2141
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Nature, May 19, 2011, Vol.473(7347), p.384(8)
    Description: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are widely used to treat patients with leukaemia driven by BCR-ABL1 (ref. 1) and other oncogenic tyrosine kinases (2,3). Recent efforts have focused on developing more potent TKIs that also inhibit mutant tyrosine kinases (4,5). However, even effective TKIs typically fail to eradicate leukaemia-initiating cells (LICs) (6-8), which often cause recurrence of leukaemia after initially successful treatment. Here we report the discovery of a novel mechanism of drug resistance, which is based on protective feedback signalling of leukaemia cells in response to treatment with TKI. We identify BCL6 as a central component of this drug-resistance pathway and demonstrate that targeted inhibition of BCL6 leads to eradication of drug-resistant and leukaemia-initiating subclones.
    Keywords: Drug Resistance -- Genetic Aspects ; Drug Resistance -- Research ; Protein Kinases -- Physiological Aspects ; Protein Kinases -- Research ; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia -- Risk Factors ; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia -- Genetic Aspects ; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia -- Research
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: 2012, Vol.7(8), p.e42863
    Description: Separase, an endopeptidase required for the separation of sister-chromatides in mitotic anaphase, triggers centriole disengagement during centrosome duplication. In cancer, separase is frequently overexpressed, pointing to a functional role as an aneuploidy promoter associated with centrosomal amplification and genomic instability. Recently, we have shown that centrosomal amplification and subsequent chromosomal aberrations are a hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), increasing from chronic phase (CP) toward blast crisis (BC). Moreover, a functional linkage of p210BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase activity with centrosomal amplification and clonal evolution has been established in long-term cell culture experiments. Unexpectedly, therapeutic doses of imatinib (IM) did not counteract; instead induced similar centrosomal alterations in vitro . We investigated the influence of IM and p210BCR-ABL on Separase as a potential driver of centrosomal amplification in CML. Short-term cell cultures of p210BCR-ABL-negative (NHDF, UROtsa, HL-60, U937), positive (K562, LAMA-84) and inducible (U937p210BCR-ABL/c6 (Tet-ON)) human cell lines were treated with therapeutic doses of IM and analyzed by qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis and quantitative Separase activity assays. Decreased Separase protein levels were observed in all cells treated with IM in a dose dependent manner. Accordingly, in all p210BCR-ABL-negative cell lines, decreased proteolytic activity of Separase was found. In contrast, p210BCR-ABL-positive cells showed increased Separase proteolytic activity. This activation of Separase was consistent with changes in the expression levels of Separase regulators (Separase phosphorylation at serine residue 1126, Securin, CyclinB1 and PP2A). Our data suggest that regulation of Separase in IM-treated BCR-ABL-positive cells occurs on both the protein expression and the proteolytic activity levels. Activation of Separase proteolytic activity exclusively in p210BCR-ABL-positive cells during IM treatment may act as a driving force for centrosomal amplification, contributing to genomic instability, clonal evolution and resistance in CML.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Cell Biology ; Hematology ; Oncology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    In: Nature, 2011, Vol.478(7367), p.64
    Description: Myelodysplastic syndromes and related disorders (myelodysplasia) are a heterogeneous group of myeloid neoplasms showing deregulated blood cell production with evidence of myeloid dysplasia and a predisposition to acute myeloid leukaemia, whose pathogenesis is only incompletely understood. Here we report whole-exome sequencing of 29 myelodysplasia specimens, which unexpectedly revealed novel pathway mutations involving multiple components of the RNA splicing machinery, including U2AF35, ZRSR2, SRSF2 and SF3B1. In a large series analysis, these splicing pathway mutations were frequent (~45 to ~85 %) in, and highly specific to, myeloid neoplasms showing features of myelodysplasia. Conspicuously, most of the mutations, which occurred in a mutually exclusive manner, affected genes involved in the 3'-splice site recognition during pre-mRNA processing, inducing abnormal RNA splicing and compromised haematopoiesis. Our results provide the first evidence indicating that genetic alterations of the major splicing components could be involved in human pathogenesis, also implicating a novel therapeutic possibility for myelodysplasia.
    Keywords: Gene Mutation -- Research ; Myelodysplastic Syndromes -- Genetic Aspects ; Myelodysplastic Syndromes -- Risk Factors ; Myelodysplastic Syndromes -- Diagnosis ; Myelodysplastic Syndromes -- Research ; Rna Splicing -- Research;
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2018, Vol.13(1), p.e0191734
    Description: ESPL1/separase, a cysteine endopeptidase, is a key player in centrosome duplication and mitotic sister chromatid separation. Aberrant expression and/or altered separase proteolytic activity are associated with centrosome amplification, aneuploidy, tumorigenesis and disease progression. Since centrosome alterations are a common and early detectable feature in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and cytogenetic aberrations play an important role in disease risk stratification, we examined separase activity on single cell level in 67 bone marrow samples obtained from patients with MDS, secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and healthy controls by a flow cytometric separase activity assay. The separase activity distribution (SAD) value, a calculated measure for the occurrence of cells with prominent separase activity within the analyzed sample, was tested for correlation with the centrosome, karyotype and gene mutation status. We found higher SAD values in bone marrow cells of sAML patients than in corresponding cells of MDS patients. This concurred with an increased incidence of aberrant centrosome phenotypes in sAML vs. MDS samples. No correlation was found between SAD values and the karyotype/gene mutation status. During follow-up of four MDS patients we observed increasing SAD values after transformation to sAML, in two patients SAD values decreased during azacitidine therapy. Cell culture experiments employing MDS-L cells as an in vitro model of MDS revealed that treatment with rigosertib, a PLK1 inhibitor and therapeutic drug known to induce G2/M arrest, results in decreased SAD values. In conclusion, the appearance of cells with unusual high separase activity levels, as indicated by increased SAD values, concurs with the transformation of MDS to sAML and may reflect separase dysregulation potentially contributing to clonal evolution during MDS progression. Separase activity measurement may therefore be useful as a novel additional molecular marker for disease monitoring.
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2015, Vol.10(8), p.e0133769
    Description: ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110)-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110) as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90-180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic activity in leukemic cell lines and peripheral blood samples from leukemia patients.
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: 2012, Vol.7(11), p.e49341
    Description: Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) and related elements account for more than 8% of the human genome and significantly contribute to the human transcriptome by long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter activity. In this context, HERVs are thought to intervene in the expression of adjacent genes by providing regulatory sequences (cis-effect) or via noncoding RNA including natural antisense transcripts. To address the potential impact of HERV activity in urothelial carcinoma, we comparatively analyzed the HERV transcription profiles in paired samples of non-malignant urothelium and urothelial carcinoma derived from 13 patients with bladder cancer by means of a retrovirus-specific microarray (RetroArray). We established a characteristic HERV signature consisting of six ubiquitously active HERV subgroups (E4-1, HERV-Rb, ERV9, HERV-K-T47D, NMWV3, HERV-KC4). The transcription pattern is largely identical in human urothelial carcinoma, non-malignant urothelial tissue, four tumor-derived cell lines and in a non-malignant urothelial cell line (UROtsa). Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) of HERV-E4-1, HERV-K(HML-6) and HERV-T(S71-TK1) revealed a bias to lower HERV activity in carcinoma samples compared to non-malignant tissue. Determination of active HERV-E4-1 loci by cloning and sequencing revealed six HERV-E4-1 proviral loci that are differentially regulated in urothelial carcinoma cells and normal tissue. Two full-length HERV-E4-1 proviruses, HERV-Ec1 and HERV-Ec6, are located in antisense orientation in introns of the genes PLA2G4A and RNGTT, respectively. PLA2G4A encodes a cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) that is dysregulated in many human tumors. PLA2G4A and HERV-Ec1 displayed reciprocal transcript levels in 7 of 11 urothelial carcinoma patients. Moreover, reciprocal shifts were observed after treatment of UROtsa cells with HERV-Ec1 and PLA2G4A-directed siRNAs or 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (aza-dC) pointing to an antagonistic regulation of PLA2G4A and HERV-Ec1 transcription in human urothelial cells. We suggest that transcription of HERV-Ec1 contributes to fine tuning of cPLA2 expression, thereby facilitating tumorigenesis.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Genetics And Genomics ; Virology ; Molecular Biology ; Urology ; Computational Biology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 8
    In: Nature, 2011, Vol.473(7347), p.384
    Description: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are widely used to treat patients with leukemia driven by BCR-ABL1 1 and other oncogenic tyrosine kinases 2 , 3 . Recent efforts focused on the development of more potent TKI that also inhibit mutant tyrosine kinases 4 , 5 . However, even effective TKI typically fail to eradicate leukemia-initiating cells 6 – 8 , which often cause recurrence of leukemia after initially successful treatment. Here we report on the discovery of a novel mechanism of drug-resistance, which is based on protective feedback signaling of leukemia cells in response to TKI-treatment. We identified BCL6 as a central component of this drug-resistance pathway and demonstrate that targeted inhibition of BCL6 leads to eradication of drug-resistant and leukemia-initiating subclones. BCL6 is a known proto-oncogene that is often translocated in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) 9 . In response to TKI-treatment, BCR-ABL1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells upregulate BCL6 protein levels by ~90-fold, i.e. to similar levels as in DLBCL ( Fig. 1a ). Upregulation of BCL6 in response to TKI-treatment represents a novel defense mechanism, which enables leukemia cells to survive TKI-treatment: Previous work suggested that TKI-mediated cell death is largely p53-independent. Here we demonstrate that BCL6 upregulation upon TKI-treatment leads to transcriptional inactivation of the p53 pathway. BCL6-deficient leukemia cells fail to inactivate p53 and are particularly sensitive to TKI-treatment. BCL6 −/− leukemia cells are poised to undergo cellular senescence and fail to initiate leukemia in serial transplant recipients. A combination of TKI-treatment and a novel BCL6 peptide inhibitor markedly increased survival of NOD/SCID mice xenografted with patient-derived BCR-ABL1 ALL cells. We propose that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases and BCL6-dependent feedback ( Supplementary Fig. 1 ) represents a novel strategy to eradicate drug-resistant and leukemia-initiating subclones in tyrosine kinase-driven leukemia.
    Keywords: Article;
    ISSN: 0028-0836
    E-ISSN: 14764687
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2014, Vol.9(7), p.e103113
    Description: As the incidence of azole resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus is rising and the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in immunocompromised patients is rarely based on positive culture yield, we screened our Aspergillus DNA sample collection for the occurrence of azole resistance mediating cyp51 A key mutations. Using two established, a modified and a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays followed by DNA sequence analysis to detect the most frequent mutations in the A. fumigatus cyp51 A gene conferring azole resistance (TR34 (tandem repeat), L98H and M220 alterations). We analyzed two itraconazole and voriconazole and two multi-azole resistant clinical isolates and screened 181 DNA aliquots derived from clinical samples (blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), biopsies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) of 155 immunocompromised patients of our Aspergillus DNA sample collection, previously tested positive for Aspergillus DNA and collected between 1995 and 2013. Using a novel PCR assay for the detection of the cyp51 A 46 bp tandem repeat (TR46) directly from clinical samples, we found the alteration in a TR46/Y121F/T289A positive clinical isolate. Fifty stored DNA aliquots from clinical samples were TR46 negative. DNA sequence analysis revealed a single L98H mutation in 2010, two times the L98H alteration combined with TR34 in 2011 and 2012 and a so far unknown N90K mutation in 1998. In addition, four clinical isolates were tested positive for the TR34/L98H combination in the year 2012. We consider our assay of epidemiological relevance to detect A. fumigatus azole resistance in culture-negative clinical samples of immunocompromised patients; a prospective study is ongoing.
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2015, Vol.10(6), p.e0129648
    Description: Unbalanced (major route) additional cytogenetic aberrations (ACA) at diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) indicate an increased risk of progression and shorter survival. Moreover, newly arising ACA under imatinib treatment and clonal evolution are considered features of acceleration and define failure of therapy according to the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) recommendations. On the basis of 1151 Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic phase patients of the randomized CML-study IV, we examined the incidence of newly arising ACA under imatinib treatment with regard to the p210BCR-ABL breakpoint variants b2a2 and b3a2. We found a preferential acquisition of unbalanced ACA in patients with b3a2 vs. b2a2 fusion type (ratio: 6.3 vs. 1.6, p = 0.0246) concurring with a faster progress to blast crisis for b3a2 patients (p = 0.0124). ESPL1/Separase, a cysteine endopeptidase, is a key player in chromosomal segregation during mitosis. Separase overexpression and/or hyperactivity has been reported from a wide range of cancers and cause defective mitotic spindles, chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy. We investigated the influence of p210BCR-ABL breakpoint variants and imatinib treatment on expression and proteolytic activity of Separase as measured with a specific fluorogenic assay on CML cell lines (b2a2: KCL-22, BV-173; b3a2: K562, LAMA-84). Despite a drop in Separase protein levels an up to 5.4-fold increase of Separase activity under imatinib treatment was observed exclusively in b3a2 but not in b2a2 cell lines. Mimicking the influence of imatinib on BV-173 and LAMA-84 cells by ESPL1 silencing stimulated Separase proteolytic activity in both b3a2 and b2a2 cell lines. Our data suggest the existence of a fusion type-related feedback mechanism that posttranslationally stimulates Separase proteolytic activity after therapy-induced decreases in Separase protein levels. This could render b3a2 CML cells more prone to aneuploidy and clonal evolution than b2a2 progenitors and may therefore explain the cytogenetic results of CML patients.
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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