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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 27 June 2017, Vol.114(26), pp.6824-6829
    Description: The functions of many bacterial RNA-binding proteins remain obscure because of a lack of knowledge of their cellular ligands. Although well-studied cold-shock protein A (CspA) family members are induced and function at low temperature, others are highly expressed in infection-relevant conditions. Here, we have profiled transcripts bound in vivo by the CspA family members of serovar Typhimurium to link the constitutively expressed CspC and CspE proteins with virulence pathways. Phenotypic assays in vitro demonstrated a crucial role for these proteins in membrane stress, motility, and biofilm formation. Moreover, double deletion of and fully attenuates in systemic mouse infection. In other words, the RNA ligand-centric approach taken here overcomes a problematic molecular redundancy of CspC and CspE that likely explains why these proteins have evaded selection in previous virulence factor screens in animals. Our results highlight RNA-binding proteins as regulators of pathogenicity and potential targets of antimicrobial therapy. They also suggest that globally acting RNA-binding proteins are more common in bacteria than currently appreciated.
    Keywords: RNA-Binding Protein ; Salmonella ; Bacterial Pathogenesis ; Cold-Shock Protein ; Stress Response ; Bacterial Proteins ; Cold Shock Proteins and Peptides ; Heat-Shock Proteins ; RNA-Binding Proteins ; Salmonella Infections ; Salmonella Typhimurium ; Virulence Factors
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Genes & development, 15 May 2013, Vol.27(10), pp.1073-8
    Description: The abundant RNA-binding proteins CsrA and Hfq each impact bacterial physiology by working in conjunction with small RNAs to control large post-transcriptional regulons. The small RNAs involved were considered mechanistically distinct, regulating mRNAs either directly through Hfq-mediated base-pairing or indirectly by sequestering the global translational repressor CsrA. In this issue of Genes & Development, Jørgensen and colleagues (pp. 1132-1145) blur these distinctions with a dual-mechanism small RNA that acts through both Hfq and CsrA to regulate the formation of bacterial biofilms.
    Keywords: Csra ; Csrb ; Hfq ; Pga ; C-Di-Gmp ; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Biofilms -- Growth & Development ; Escherichia Coli -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics
    ISSN: 08909369
    E-ISSN: 1549-5477
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 11 October 2016, Vol.113(41), pp.11591-11596
    Description: The functional annotation of transcriptomes and identification of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) classes has been greatly facilitated by the advent of next-generation RNA sequencing which, by reading the nucleotide order of transcripts, theoretically allows the rapid profiling of all transcripts in a cell. However, primary sequence per se is a poor predictor of function, as ncRNAs dramatically vary in length and structure and often lack identifiable motifs. Therefore, to visualize an informative RNA landscape of organisms with potentially new RNA biology that are emerging from microbiome and environmental studies requires the use of more functionally relevant criteria. One such criterion is the association of RNAs with functionally important cognate RNA-binding proteins. Here we analyze the full ensemble of cellular RNAs using gradient profiling by sequencing (Grad-seq) in the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica, partitioning its coding and noncoding transcripts based on their network of RNA-protein interactions. In addition to capturing established RNA classes based on their biochemical profiles, the Grad-seq approach enabled the discovery of an overlooked large collective of structured small RNAs that form stable complexes with the conserved protein ProQ. We show that ProQ is an abundant RNA-binding protein with a wide range of ligands and a global influence on Salmonella gene expression. Given its generic ability to chart a functional RNA landscape irrespective of transcript length and sequence diversity, Grad-seq promises to define functional RNA classes and major RNA-binding proteins in both model species and genetically intractable organisms.
    Keywords: Hfq ; Proq ; RNA–Protein Interaction ; Noncoding RNA ; Small RNA ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing -- Methods ; RNA, Bacterial -- Metabolism ; RNA-Binding Proteins -- Metabolism ; Salmonella Enterica -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic Acids Research, 2013, Vol. 41(12), p. e122
    Description: We present here a method that enables functional screening of large number of mutations in a single experiment through the combination of random mutagenesis, phenotypic cell sorting and high-throughput sequencing. As a test case, we studied post-transcriptional gene regulation of the bacterial csgD messenger RNA, which is regulated by a small RNA (sRNA). A 109 bp sequence within the csgD 5'-UTR, containing all elements for expression and sRNA-dependent control, was mutagenized close to saturation. We monitored expression from a translational gfp fusion and collected fractions of cells with distinct expression levels by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Deep sequencing of mutant plasmids from cells in different activity-sorted fractions identified functionally important positions in the messenger RNA that impact on intrinsic (translational activity per se) and extrinsic (sRNA-based) gene regulation. The results obtained corroborate previously published data. In addition to pinpointing nucleotide positions that change expression levels, our approach also reveals mutations that are silent in terms of gene expression and/or regulation. This method provides a simple and informative tool for studies of regulatory sequences in RNA, in particular addressing RNA structure-function relationships (e.g. sRNA-mediated control, riboswitch elements). However, slight protocol modifications also permit mapping of functional DNA elements and functionally important regions in proteins.
    Keywords: Natural Sciences ; Naturvetenskap ; Medical And Health Sciences ; Medicin Och Hälsovetenskap
    ISSN: 0305-1048
    E-ISSN: 13624962
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  • 5
    In: Molecular Microbiology, May 2012, Vol.84(3), pp.414-427
    Description: Roughly 10% of all genes in are controlled by the global transcription factor Lrp, which responds to nutrient availability. Bioinformatically, we identified as one of several putative targets for the sRNA MicF, which is transcriptionally downregulated by Lrp. Deleting results in higher Lrp levels, while overexpression of MicF inhibits Lrp synthesis. This effect is by antisense; mutations in the predicted interaction region relieve MicF‐dependent repression of Lrp synthesis, and regulation is restored by compensatory mutations. , MicF sterically interferes with initiation complex formation and inhibits mRNA translation. , MicF indirectly activates genes in the Lrp regulon by repressing Lrp, and causes severely impaired growth in minimal medium, a phenotype characteristic of deletion strains. The double negative feedback between MicF and Lrp may promote a switch for adequate Lrp‐dependent adaptation to nutrient availability. Lrp adds to the growing list of transcription factors that are targeted by sRNAs, thus indicating that perhaps the majority of all bacterial genes may be directly or indirectly controlled by sRNAs.
    Keywords: Biology;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 07 June 2018, Vol.70(5), pp.971-982.e6
    Description: The conserved RNA-binding protein ProQ has emerged as the centerpiece of a previously unknown third large network of post-transcriptional control in enterobacteria. Here, we have used UV crosslinking and RNA sequencing (CLIP-seq) to map hundreds of ProQ binding sites in and . Our analysis of these binding sites, many of which are conserved, suggests that ProQ recognizes its cellular targets through RNA structural motifs found in small RNAs (sRNAs) and at the 3′ end of mRNAs. Using the mRNA as a model for 3′ end targeting, we reveal a function for ProQ in protecting mRNA against exoribonucleolytic activity. Taken together, our results underpin the notion that ProQ governs a post-transcriptional network distinct from those of the well-characterized sRNA-binding proteins, CsrA and Hfq, and suggest a previously unrecognized, sRNA-independent role of ProQ in stabilizing mRNAs. Using CLIP-seq, Holmqvist et al. map transcriptome-wide interactions of the emerging global RNA-binding protein ProQ in and . Their data suggest ProQ to target sRNAs and mRNA 3′ UTRs primarily through a structural code and to stabilize some mRNAs by counteracting 3′ exoribonuclease activity.
    Keywords: Proq ; Clip-Seq ; RNA-Binding Protein ; 3′ Utr ; Post-Transcriptional Control ; Exoribonuclease ; Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Methods in enzymology, 2018, Vol.612, pp.127-145
    Description: RNA-protein interactions are at the heart of many central cellular processes, and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) associate with virtually all RNA molecules in a cell. In bacteria, global RBPs, often in conjunction with small regulatory RNAs, affect physiology and virulence by controlling transcription, translation, and RNA decay. To understand how these regulatory proteins orchestrate global gene expression, detailed maps of their cellular RNA binding sites are required. To this end, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (CLIP-seq) has revolutionized RBP studies by providing knowledge about global recognition patterns of RBPs in both eukaryotic and bacterial cells. In this chapter, we provide a step-by-step protocol for global mapping of bona fide RBP binding sites using CLIP-seq in bacteria. This protocol has been successfully applied for charting the binding sites of Hfq, CsrA, and ProQ, three global regulatory RBPs in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, and should be readily applicable to other RBPs and bacterial species.
    Keywords: Clip-Seq ; Rbp ; RNA Binding ; RNA–Protein Interaction
    ISSN: 00766879
    E-ISSN: 1557-7988
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, 2018, Vol.16(10), pp.601-615
    Description: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are central to most if not all cellular processes, dictating the fate of virtually all RNA molecules in the cell. Starting with pioneering work on ribosomal proteins, studies of bacterial RBPs have paved the way for molecular studies of RNA-protein interactions. Work over...
    Keywords: Medical And Health Sciences ; Basic Medicine ; Microbiology In The Medical Area ; Medicin Och Hälsovetenskap ; Medicinska Och Farmaceutiska Grundvetenskaper ; Mikrobiologi Inom Det Medicinska Området
    ISSN: 1740-1526
    E-ISSN: 17401534
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: EMBO journal: European Molecular Biology Organization, 2016, Issue 9, pp.991-1011
    Description: The molecular roles of many RNA‐binding proteins in bacterial post‐transcriptional gene regulation are not well understood. Approaches combining in vivo UV crosslinking with RNA deep sequencing (CLIP‐seq) have begun to revolutionize the transcriptome‐wide mapping of eukaryotic RNA‐binding protein target sites. We have applied CLIP‐seq to chart the target landscape of two major bacterial post‐transcriptional regulators, Hfq and CsrA, in the model pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium. By detecting binding sites at single‐nucleotide resolution, we identify RNA preferences and structural constraints of Hfq and CsrA during their interactions with hundreds of cellular transcripts. This reveals 3′‐located Rho‐independent terminators as a universal motif involved in Hfq–RNA interactions. Additionally, Hfq preferentially binds 5′ to sRNA‐target sites in mRNAs, and 3′ to seed sequences in sRNAs, reflecting a simple logic in how Hfq facilitates sRNA–mRNA interactions. Importantly, global knowledge of Hfq sites significantly improves sRNA‐target predictions. CsrA binds AUGGA sequences in apical loops and targets many Salmonella virulence mRNAs. Overall, our generic CLIP‐seq approach will bring new insights into post‐transcriptional gene regulation by RNA‐binding proteins in diverse bacterial species.
    Keywords: Clip ; Csra ; Hfq ; Non‐Coding Rna ; Peak Calling ; Post‐Transcriptional Control ; Small Rna ; Terminator ; Translation
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    Source: Fundación Dialnet
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  • 10
    In: EMBO Journal, 02 May 2016, Vol.35(9), pp.991-1011
    Description: The molecular roles of many ‐binding proteins in bacterial post‐transcriptional gene regulation are not well understood. Approaches combining crosslinking with deep sequencing (‐seq) have begun to revolutionize the transcriptome‐wide mapping of eukaryotic ‐binding protein target sites. We have applied ‐seq to chart the target landscape of two major bacterial post‐transcriptional regulators, Hfq and CsrA, in the model pathogen Typhimurium. By detecting binding sites at single‐nucleotide resolution, we identify preferences and structural constraints of Hfq and CsrA during their interactions with hundreds of cellular transcripts. This reveals 3′‐located Rho‐independent terminators as a universal motif involved in Hfq– interactions. Additionally, Hfq preferentially binds 5′ to ‐target sites in s, and 3′ to seed sequences in s, reflecting a simple logic in how Hfq facilitates – interactions. Importantly, global knowledge of Hfq sites significantly improves ‐target predictions. CsrA binds sequences in apical loops and targets many virulence s. Overall, our generic ‐seq approach will bring new insights into post‐transcriptional gene regulation by ‐binding proteins in diverse bacterial species. A new pipeline for ‐seq in maps global –protein interactions and offers a tool for improved understanding of post‐transcriptional control in bacteria. Transcriptome‐wide mapping of Hfq and CsrA target sites by CLIP‐seq. Rho‐independent terminators comprise a general Hfq‐binding motif. Hfq binds 5′ to sRNA‐binding sites in mRNA targets and 3′ to seed sequences in cognate the sRNAs. CsrA preferentially recognizes AUGGA sequences present in loops of hairpin structures. CsrA binds and regulates many mRNAs encoding virulence factors. A new pipeline for CLIP‐seq in maps global RNA–protein interactions and offers a tool for improved understanding of post‐transcriptional control in bacteria.
    Keywords: Clip ; Csra ; Hfq ; Non‐Coding Rna ; Peak Calling ; Post‐Transcriptional Control ; Small Rna ; Terminator ; Translation
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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