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  • 1
    In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, April 2014, Vol.23(7-8), pp.1120-1132
    Description: Byline: Inger Brannstrom Keywords: early childhood; gender equality; nursing; parenting; pediatric; qualitative assessment; sudden infant death; Sweden; women Aims and objectives To reveal the prominent discourses and assigned social ordering given to women in paediatric research in Sweden concerning the subject of sudden infant death syndrome. Background There are no further studies in Sweden and elsewhere, regarding publishing portraits of women's social ordering in nursing research surrounding sudden infant death syndrome. Design and methods The material encompassed all 55 articles/comments published by the Swedish Medical Journal 1980-2007 (7 March) as retrieved using selected keywords. The items were accessed in full text, and a discourse analytical approach was used triangulated with feminist theoretical perspectives. Results Three main discourses were identified: (1) women as bearers of guilt and accountability, (2) a social ordering where women's biology and lifestyles received great attention together with a tribute to mothers as having the principal responsibility as parent and caregiver and (3) gender-based health policy portrayals showing women/mothers in marginalised social and structural contexts or exposed to one-sided disciplinary penal codes despite the Swedish welfare state having long declared gender equality in its family policies and in paediatric nursing practices. Conclusions Although results from this study primarily relate to the Swedish contexts, they may also reflect the dual role in paediatric nursing practices in other countries, that is, (1) as being medical experts on children's health (paediatrics and nursing) and (2) as change agents with regard to childcare and practical recommendations directed to individuals (mothers, fathers, both or other caregivers of infants). Relevance to clinical practice The study highlights the needs of not merely seeing the family or the mother as ultimate and individual beneficiaries of medical/practical advice about child-caring duties in infancy. Further studies are encouraged to recognise infant nursing practices, gender equality and safe parenthood in child health research and nursing practices.
    Keywords: Early Childhood ; Gender Equality ; Nursing ; Parenting ; Pediatric ; Qualitative Assessment ; Sudden Infant Death ; Weden ; Women
    ISSN: 0962-1067
    E-ISSN: 1365-2702
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Clinical Pediatrics, January 2014, Vol.53(1), pp.38-40
    Description: Purpose. This article presents a worldview of youth who are victims of homelessness. A view of family dynamics and how they affect the emotional, psychological, social, and physical health of homeless youth is presented. Results. Homeless youth and their families are at high risk for poor health outcomes. Those who present for health care services are least likely to return to the same site for follow-up care. Conclusion. Understanding the dynamics of homelessness and its effect on youth and family will facilitate efforts to engage the family and increase the likelihood for follow-up with the same provider. A patient-centered cognitive approach when managing these youth and their family will improve communication, potentiate engagement, whet creative decision making, and facilitate continuity of care.
    Keywords: Youth ; Sexual Minority ; Voluntary Homeless ; Involuntary Homeless ; Couch Surf ; Temporary Housing ; House Sharing ; Continuity of Care ; Engage ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0009-9228
    E-ISSN: 1938-2707
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Vaccine, Dec 30, 2011, Vol.29, p.D54-D59
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.04.014 Byline: Inger K. Damon Keywords: Monkeypox; Smallpox Abstract: Monkeypox, a vesiculo-pustular rash illness, was initially discovered to cause human infection in 1970 through the World Health Organization (WHO)-sponsored efforts of the Commission to Certify Smallpox Eradication in Western Africa and the Congo Basin. The virus had been discovered to cause a nonhuman primate rash illness in 1958, and was thus named monkeypox. The causative agents of monkeypox and smallpox diseases both are species of Orthopoxvirus. Orthopoxvirus monkeypox, when it infects humans as an epizootic, produces a similar clinical picture to that of ordinary human smallpox. Since 1970, extensive epidemiology, virology, ecology and public health research has enabled better characterization of monkeypox virus and the associated human disease. This work reviews the progress in this body of research, and reviews studies of this "newly" emerging zoonotic disease. Author Affiliation: Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of High Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, Office of Infectious Diseases, CDC, 1600 Clifton Rd. NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States Article History: Received 20 December 2010; Revised 17 March 2011; Accepted 4 April 2011
    Keywords: Smallpox Vaccines -- Health Aspects ; Zoonoses -- Health Aspects ; Medical Research -- Health Aspects ; Monkeypox -- Health Aspects ; Public Health -- Health Aspects ; Epidemiology -- Health Aspects
    ISSN: 0264-410X
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Feb, 2012, Vol.21(3-4), p.311(11)
    Description: To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03847.x Byline: Inger Flemme, Ingela Johansson, Anna Stromberg Keywords: anxiety; arrhythmia; coping; depression; implantable cardioverter defibrillator; nurses; nursing; perceived control; quality of life Abstract: Aims. To describe coping strategies and coping effectiveness in recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and to explore factors influencing coping. Background. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators are documented as saving lives and are used to treat ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Despite the implantable cardioverter defibrillator not evidently interfering with everyday life, there is conflicting evidence regarding the psychosocial impact of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation such as anxiety, depression, perceived control and quality of life and how these concerns may relate to coping. Design. Cross-sectional multicentre design. Methods. Individuals (n = 147, mean age 63 years, 121 men) who had lived with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator between 6-24 months completed the Jalowiec Coping Scale-60, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Control Attitude Scale and Quality of Life Index-Cardiac version. Results. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators recipients seldom used coping strategies, and the coping strategies used were perceived as fairly helpful. Optimism was found to be the most frequently used (1*8 SD 0*68) and most effective (2*1 SD 0*48) coping strategy, and recipients perceived moderate control in life. Anxiety ([beta] = 3*5, p [less than or equal to] 0*001) and gender ([beta] = 12*3, p = 0*046) accounted for 26% of the variance in the total use of coping strategies, suggesting that the more symptoms of anxiety and being women the greater use of coping strategies. Conclusions. Most recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator did not appraise daily concerns as stressors in need of coping and seem to have made a successful transition in getting on with their lives 6-24 months after implantation. Relevance to clinical practice. Nurses working with recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator should have a supportive communication so that positive outcomes such as decreased anxiety and increased perceived control and quality of life can be obtained. Through screening for anxiety at follow-up in the outpatient clinic, these recipients perceiving mental strain in their daily life can be identified. Article History: Accepted for publication: 26 May 2011 Article note: Inger Flemme, Senior Lecturer, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, P.O. Box 823, S-30118 Halmstad, Sweden. Telephone: +46 35 167432. , E-mail: inger.flemme@hh.se
    Keywords: Nursing ; Depression (Mood disorder) ; Tachycardia ; Defibrillators ; Prostheses And Implants ; Nurses ; Medical Care Quality
    ISSN: 0962-1067
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  • 5
    In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, March 2016, Vol.25(5-6), pp.769-776
    Description: Byline: Inger Jansson, Anna Forsberg Keywords: evidence-based practice; individual nursing care plan; in-patient; nursing interventions Aims and objectives To explore how nurses and managers perceive that evidence-based sources are obtained to inform relevant nursing interventions. Background Implementation of evidence-based practice requires a systematic search and evaluation of research, clinical expertise and consideration of the patients' preferences and values. Much has been written over the past decade about how this should be done and nurses' mandatory education has provided them with the necessary tools to work in this way. In spite of this, nurses do not provide evidence-based practice on a regular basis. Many of the barriers against evidence-based practice are dependent on contextual factors. Therefore, it can be of interest to study both managers and nurses. Design This qualitative study has an explorative and retrospective design. Method Interviews were conducted with 15 participants, including eight nurses, four ward managers, two operation managers and one care developer. Directed content analysis was used. Result Nurses and managers had different approaches towards the use of scientific knowledge. Nurses' use of clinical experience and learning from each other was common. Nurses' work as facilitators was structured by managers. Not involving the patient in the care was common among the nurses. Conclusion The parts of evidence-based practice that are supported by the managers are also used by the nurses. When use of research is not controlled by the managers, the nurses do not search for scientific research. Neither is the patients' involvement in decision-making obvious. Relevance to clinical practice A change in nurses' attitudes to scientific knowledge and perception of patient participation is needed. For this to happen, nurses need managers with a strong interest in evidence-based practice that support successful implementation of research in everyday clinical practise.
    Keywords: Evidence‐Based Practice ; Individual Nursing Care Plan ; In‐Patient ; Nursing Interventions
    ISSN: 0962-1067
    E-ISSN: 1365-2702
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nurse Education Today, December 2013, Vol.33(12), pp.1599-1604
    Description: Cost limitations might challenge the use of high-fidelity simulation as a teaching–learning method. This article presents the results of a Norwegian project including two simulation studies in which simulation teaching and learning were studied among students in the second year of a three-year bachelor nursing programme. The students were organised into small simulation groups with different roles; nurse, physician, family member and observer. Based on experiences in different roles, the students evaluated the simulation design characteristics and educational practices used in the simulation. In addition, three simulation outcomes were measured; knowledge (learning), Student Satisfaction and Self-confidence in Learning. The simulation was evaluated to be a valuable teaching–learning method to develop professional understanding and insight independent of roles. Overall, the students rated the Student Satisfaction and Self-confidence in Learning as high. Knowledge about the specific patient focus increased after the simulation activity. Students can develop practical, communication and collaboration skills, through experiencing the nurse's role. Assuming the observer role, students have the potential for vicarious learning, which could increase the learning value. Both methods of learning (practical experience or vicarious learning) may bridge the gap between theory and practice and contribute to the development of skills in reflective and critical thinking.
    Keywords: High-Fidelity Simulation ; Nursing Education ; Experiential Learning ; Vicarious Learning ; Medicine ; Nursing
    ISSN: 0260-6917
    E-ISSN: 1532-2793
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  • 7
    In: Movement Disorders, October 2015, Vol.30(12), pp.1711-1711
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mds.26367/abstract Byline: Inger van Steenoven, Dag Aarsland, Daniel Weintraub ***** No abstract is available for this article. ***** Article Note: Relevant conflicts of interest/financial disclosures: Nothing to report. Author roles may be found in the online version of this article.
    Keywords: Neuropsychological Tests ; Cognition -- Physiology ; Cognition Disorders -- Diagnosis ; Dementia -- Diagnosis ; Parkinson Disease -- Diagnosis;
    ISSN: 0885-3185
    E-ISSN: 1531-8257
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: European Eating Disorders Review, Jan, 2013, Vol.21(1), p.(1)
    Description: Byline: Inger Halvorsen, Oyvind Ro, Sonja Heyerdahl Abstract Background Few previous anorexia nervosa (AN) studies include siblings. Objective To investigate if adolescents with AN retrospectively perceived their parents as less caring and more controlling than their siblings, whether perceived parenting was related to psychological problems, and how AN had influenced their everyday lives. Method Forty-six former patients (mean age 23.1ayears) and 21 siblings participated in the study by completing the Parental Bonding Inventory (PBI) and a questionnaire on the influence of AN during the acute phase. Results Former patients and their siblings had similar PBI results. Better adaptive functioning and lower levels of internalising psychological problems were correlated with higher ratings of parental care in both patients and siblings. Both patients and siblings reported that the illness had created conflict and caused concern, but had also provided valuable experiences. Conclusion Perceived parenting was associated with psychological problems in young adulthood but not with eating disorders. Our PBI results for both former patients and siblings were quite similar to non-clinical control groups. Health personnel treating adolescent AN should be aware of siblings' perspectives and needs. Copyright A[c] 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Correspondence: Inger Halvorsen, M.D., Ph.D., Regional Department of Eating Disorders, Department of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital-Ulleval Hospital, P O Boxa4956 Nydalen, NO-0424 Oslo, Norway. Email: inger.halvorsen@uus.no
    Keywords: Anorexia Nervosa ; Youth ; Parenting
    ISSN: 1072-4133
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  • 9
    In: European Eating Disorders Review, September 2012, Vol.20(5), pp.386-392
    Description: Byline: Inger Halvorsen, Dagmar Platou, Arne Hoiseth Abstract Objective This paper aims to study long-term bone mineral development in former patients with an onset of anorexia nervosa during childhood and adolescence. Methods Bone mineral density (BMD) in lumbar spine and total hip was measured in 39 female participants (mean agea=a23.1ayears, SD 3.5) an average of 8.1 ([+ or -]3.3) years after treatment start. Results At follow-up, seven participants (17.9%) still suffered from an eating disorder. Mean BMD in the former patients was within the normal range in the hip but significantly reduced in the spine. Fourteen (36%) of the participants had osteopenia, and three (8%) had osteoporosis in the spine and/or hip. Amenorrhea for more than two years was associated with reduced BMD in the spine, whereas low weight at follow-up was associated with low BMD in both the spine and the hip. Conclusion A large minority of these former patients had low bone mass in young adulthood. In accordance with other studies, our findings support the importance of weight restoration for future bone health in young patients with anorexia nervosa. Copyright A[c] 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Correspondence: Inger Halvorsen, Regional Department of Eating Disorders, Oslo University Hospital-Ulleval Hospital, P.O. Boxa4956 Nydalen, NO-0424, Oslo, Norway. Tel: +47 95 77 06 30/+47 23 01 62 30; Fax: +47 23 01 62 31. Email: inger.halvorsen@uus.no
    Keywords: Anorexia Nervosa ; Eating Disorders ; Bone Mineral Density ; Osteoporosis ; Long‐Term Outcome
    ISSN: 1072-4133
    E-ISSN: 1099-0968
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 15 December 2011, Vol.311(1-2), pp.50-57
    Description: The county of Värmland, Sweden, has shown a high frequency of multiple sclerosis in several investigations. It has been presented in three studies; a period prevalence study in 1925–1934, a mortality study during 1952–1992 and a prevalence investigation in 2002. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of industry in this high-risk area for multiple sclerosis. The three investigations were correlated with industry in 1913 and in the 1950s, all analyzed by the Kruskall–Wallis test. Select industries from wood-pulp, paper and iron/mechanical sectors were tested also in whole Sweden. The Spearman rank correlation was used for these data and forestry data in Värmland. In Värmland, industrial data from 1913 revealed that large sawmills were associated with the period prevalence in 1925–1934 and there was a possible correlation with the prevalence for 2002. Wood-pulp factories showed a possible association with the prevalence 1925–1934 and the mortality 1952–1992. Some industries in the 1950s were correlated with the prevalence 2002. Wood and paper industries in Sweden 1913 showed an association with the MS mortality 1952–1992. In summary, data on MS prevalence in Värmland and mortality both in Värmland and all Sweden from the past 100 years suggest an association with wood-related industries in 1913 and in the 1950s, whereas no consistent association was found for other industries.
    Keywords: Multiple Sclerosis ; Prevalence ; Mortality ; Environmental ; Ecological ; Pollutions ; Industry ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0022-510X
    E-ISSN: 1878-5883
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