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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987), 11 May 2016, Vol.30(37), pp.34-6
    Description: Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information about how to care for a patient after death, and support their family and loved ones in the community setting. ▶ Care after death involves supporting the family and significant others, and providing personal care to the patient. ▶ It is important to ensure privacy, dignity and respect of the deceased and to recognise this is a sensitive and difficult time for families. ▶ Staff undertaking care after death should be offered support. ▶ Local and national guidelines should be followed. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice, reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could help you to consider the support mechanisms in place for the provision of care after death in the community setting. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio .
    Keywords: Care After Death ; Clinical Procedures ; Clinical Skills ; Communication ; Community Setting ; Family Support ; Personal Care ; Death ; Nurse'S Role ; Practice Guidelines As Topic ; Family Nursing -- Standards
    ISSN: 00296570
    E-ISSN: 2047-9018
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  • 2
    In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, July 2015, Vol.24(13-14), pp.1926-1935
    Description: AIMS AND OBJECTIVESThe aim of the study was to examine learning disability nurses' perceptions of incidents involving physical intervention, particularly factors contributing to injuries sustained by this group. BACKGROUNDThis article reports on a qualitative study undertaken within one secure NHS Trust to respond to concerns about staff injuries sustained during physical interventions to prevent incidents of service user violence from escalating out of control. The context of the study relates to increasing debate about the most effective approaches to incidents of violence and agression. DESIGNA qualitative research design was utilized for the study. METHODSSemi-structured interviews were undertaken with 20 participants, two from each of the 10 incidents involving staff injury sustained during physical intervention. RESULTSFour themes were produced by the analysis, the first, knowledge and understanding, contextualized the other three, which related to the physical intervention techniques employed, the interpretation of the incident and the impact on staff. CONCLUSIONService user violence consistently poses nurses with the challenge of balancing the need to respond in order to maintain the safety of everyone whilst simultaneous supporting and caring for people with complex needs. This study highlights the need for further exploration of the contributory factors to the escalation of potentially violent situations. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICEServices may have good systems in place for responding to and managing service user violence but appear less effective in understanding the reasons for and developing strategies to prevent violence occurring.
    Keywords: Learning Disability Nursing ; Physical Interventions ; Staff Injuries ; Violent Incidents
    ISSN: 0962-1067
    E-ISSN: 1365-2702
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, November 2014, Vol.40(6), pp.626-631
    Description: This research seeks to expand the body of knowledge surrounding International Open Access Week (OA Week) practices among small to medium-sized U.S. institutions, examining the rationales guiding these, and creating a baseline activity inventory which may be elaborated upon as open access continues to evolve and as OA Week matures beyond its fifth (2013) anniversary. An electronic survey with closed- and open-ended questions was used to collect data, which were analyzed for recurring themes. Of respondents whose campuses did observe OA Week, the most reported reason for doing so was related to supporting the library's educational outreach program; fewer respondents cited the library's philosophical commitment to open access. Lack of time was the most frequently given reason for OA Week non-participation, however around one quarter of non-participating respondents reported that they were unaware of OA Week, and another quarter reported that it did not figure in their strategic plan. The conditions that were found to best support celebrating OA Week included a grasp of the principles guiding OA on the part of at least one librarian, reinforced by: the educational mission of the library; adequate personnel; and sufficient time for planning. This exploratory study yields points for library- and self-assessment.
    Keywords: International Open Access Week ; Open Access ; Scholarly Communication ; Library Programming ; Library Outreach ; Library & Information Science
    ISSN: 0099-1333
    E-ISSN: 1879-1999
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Nursing Standard, April 27, 2016, Vol.30(35), p.36(4)
    Keywords: Death Notification Process – Management ; Nurses – Practice ; Nurses – Education ; Patient Care – Methods
    ISSN: 0029-6570
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987), 13 April 2016, Vol.30(33), pp.36-9
    Description: Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information about how to care for a patient after death and support their family in the hospital setting. Care after death involves supporting the family and significant others, and providing personal care to the patient. Staff undertaking care after death should be offered appropriate support. Local and national guidelines should be followed. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: How you think this article will change your practice. How this article could help you to consider the support mechanisms in your practice setting for the provision of care after death. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio .
    Keywords: Death ; Equipment and Supplies ; Terminal Care -- Methods
    ISSN: 00296570
    E-ISSN: 2047-9018
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nursing Standard, May 25, 2016, Vol.30(39), p.34(3)
    Keywords: Clinical Competence – Analysis ; Medical Communication – Analysis ; Patient Care – Management ; Nurses – Practice
    ISSN: 0029-6570
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  • 7
    In: The New England Journal of Medicine, 2018, Vol.379(17), pp.1589-1591
    Description: A National Academies report shows that sexual harassment is more likely to occur in environments that are male-dominated and where sexually harassing behaviors are tolerated, hierarchical relationships are enforced, and training environments may be isolating.
    Keywords: Medical Schools -- Social Aspects ; Sexual Harassment -- Social Aspects ; Sexual Harassment -- Control;
    ISSN: 0028-4793
    E-ISSN: 1533-4406
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Homosexuality, 22 February 2011, Vol.58(3), pp.382-401
    Description: This study proposes that broader social systemic factors could have a role in the perpetuation of two types of heterosexism. Old-fashioned and modern heterosexism are discussed and differentiated. The roles of social dominance orientation and the acceptance of structural violence in the maintenance of heterosexism are explored. Results indicated that social dominance orientation and the acceptance of structural violence predicted the level of old-fashioned and modern heterosexism in a sample of 129 people. Acceptance of structural violence better predicted both modern and old-fashioned heterosexism than did social dominance orientation. Such relationships highlight the possibility that social systemic beliefs may create and support heterosexism.
    Keywords: Old-Fashioned Heterosexism ; Modern Heterosexism ; Social Dominance Orientation ; Structural Violence ; Sociology & Social History ; Women'S Studies
    ISSN: 0091-8369
    E-ISSN: 1540-3602
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: JAMA, 08 November 2016, Vol.316(18), pp.1865-1866
    Description: Even though the observation that men and women are different is arguably as old as human life, women have been included in clinical trials for only a few decades. Women have a unique physiology and their experience of illness, and responses to therapeutic interventions are often significantly different from those of men. Recent regulations from the National Institutes of Health requiring grant applicants to consider sex as a variable in biomedical research are a welcome development. However, despite increasing evidence that an individual's sex is one the most important modulators of disease risk and response to treatment, consideration of the patient's sex in clinical decision making (including the choice of diagnostic tests, medications, and other treatments) is often lacking. Here, Legato et al highlight specific examples, focusing on biological sex differences in drug metabolism and cardiovascular risk that appear ready for clinical implementation.
    Keywords: Sex Characteristics ; Cardiovascular Diseases -- Complications ; Pharmaceutical Preparations -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00987484
    E-ISSN: 1538-3598
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Clinical chemistry, January 2014, Vol.60(1), pp.138-40
    Description: Preventable chronic illnesses cause 7 of 10 American deaths each year and account for 75% of US healthcare spending (1). Women are disproportionately affected by chronic disease, which negatively impacts their quality of life and their economic status (2). Women's major chronic illnesses are estimated to cost about $466 billion per year, which does not include lost potential income and additional economic impact to women and their families (2). Prevention and access to preventive services are critical to maintaining a woman's health across the lifespan. Women's preventive care is especially important for the health of future generations given the direct impact a woman's health has on birth outcomes. Yet, despite the importance of preventive care, more than half of American women are not up to date on recommended preventive services (3). A major barrier to preventive care is cost. Women use more healthcare services than men, due in part to more complex reproductive healthcare needs, longer life expectancies, and higher rates of chronic disease (4, 5). Yet women often have lower mean incomes and greater difficulty affording care. Even minimal levels of cost sharing, in the form of copays and other out-of-pocket expenses, may have a negative impact on the utilization of preventive services (3). Fortunately, the Affordable Care Act (ACA)4 takes a number of steps to improve health through a robust prevention policy. At the centerpiece of the ACA's prevention initiative is the elimination of cost sharing for many preventive services, including 8 key women's health preventive services recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and adopted by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) on August 1, 2012 (Table 1). Prevention and early detection of health conditions or diseases identified during a well-woman visit and regular preventive screenings can lead to effective …
    Keywords: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ; Women'S Health ; Health Care Reform -- Legislation & Jurisprudence ; Preventive Health Services -- Legislation & Jurisprudence
    ISSN: 00099147
    E-ISSN: 1530-8561
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