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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of biological chemistry, 13 April 2018, Vol.293(15), pp.5659-5667
    Description: Aberrant cell surface glycosylation is prevalent in tumor cells, and there is ample evidence that glycans have functional roles in carcinogenesis. Nonetheless, many molecular details remain unclear. Tumor cells frequently exhibit increased α2-6 sialylation on -glycans, a modification that is added by the ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase, and emerging evidence suggests that ST6Gal-I-mediated sialylation promotes the survival of tumor cells exposed to various cell stressors. Here we report that ST6Gal-I protects cancer cells from hypoxic stress. It is well known that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is stabilized in hypoxic cells, and, in turn, HIF-1α directs the transcription of genes important for cell survival. To investigate a putative role for ST6Gal-I in the hypoxic response, we examined HIF-1α accumulation in ovarian and pancreatic cancer cells in ST6Gal-I overexpression or knockdown experiments. We found that ST6Gal-I activity augmented HIF-1α accumulation in cells grown in a hypoxic environment or treated with two chemical hypoxia mimetics, deferoxamine and dimethyloxalylglycine. Correspondingly, hypoxic cells with high ST6Gal-I expression had increased mRNA levels of HIF-1α transcriptional targets, including the glucose transporter genes and and the glycolytic enzyme gene Interestingly, high ST6Gal-I-expressing cells also had an increased pool of HIF-1α mRNA, suggesting that ST6Gal-I may influence HIF-1α expression. Finally, cells grown in hypoxia for several weeks displayed enriched ST6Gal-I expression, consistent with a pro-survival function. Taken together, these findings unravel a glycosylation-dependent mechanism that facilitates tumor cell adaptation to a hypoxic milieu.
    Keywords: St6gal-I ; Anoxia ; Cancer Stem Cells ; Cell Stress ; Cell Surface Glycosylation ; Glycan ; Glycosylation ; Hypoxia ; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (Hif) ; Sialyltransferase ; Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Signal Transduction ; Tumor Hypoxia ; Antigens, CD -- Biosynthesis ; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, Alpha Subunit -- Metabolism ; Neoplasm Proteins -- Metabolism ; Ovarian Neoplasms -- Metabolism ; Pancreatic Neoplasms -- Metabolism ; Sialyltransferases -- Biosynthesis
    E-ISSN: 1083-351X
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Cancer Research, 07/15/2016, Vol.76(14 Supplement), pp.2797-2797
    ISSN: 0008-5472
    E-ISSN: 1538-7445
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Cancer Research, 07/01/2018, Vol.78(13 Supplement), pp.2435-2435
    ISSN: 0008-5472
    E-ISSN: 1538-7445
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Cancer Research, 07/01/2018, Vol.78(13 Supplement), pp.4092-4092
    ISSN: 0008-5472
    E-ISSN: 1538-7445
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 5
    In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 2014, Vol.472(7), pp.2208-2214
    Description: BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic joint infection is a leading cause of failure after two-stage reimplantation. One cause of relapse may be persistent subclinical infection. Difficulty exists in detecting biofilm-forming infections. Sonication disrupts biofilm and has led to higher rates of positive intraoperative cultures. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: Our aims in this study were to determine (1) if sonication results were predictive of failure, including reinfection, at 2-year followup; and (2) whether sonication of antibiotic spacers at the time of reimplantation improves sensitivity of intraoperative cultures. METHODS: We prospectively followed 36 consecutive patients undergoing two-stage reimplantation for periprosthetic hip or knee infection. Minimum followup was 19 months (mean, 29.9 months; range, 19-38 months). Results of intraoperative cultures and sonicated antibiotic spacers were analyzed. RESULTS: Positive sonication results were predictive of failure as defined by reinfection at 2-year followup. Among the 18 patients who had positive sonication results, reinfection developed in nine patients (50%) compared with two of 18 patients (11%) with negative sonication results (odds ratio, 8.0; 95% CI, 1.2-69.0). Sonication of antibiotic spacers improved the sensitivity of intraoperative cultures from 36% to 82%. CONCLUSIONS: Sonication of antibiotic spacers appears to be useful in predicting failure attributable to recurrent infection after two-stage reimplantation. For patients with positive sonication cultures during reimplantation, more aggressive antimicrobial treatment may be indicated after reimplantation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, diagnostic study. See the Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
    Keywords: Medical Research -- Health Aspects ; Antibiotics -- Health Aspects ; Prostheses And Implants -- Health Aspects;
    ISSN: 0009-921X
    E-ISSN: 15281132
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  • 6
    In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 2014, Vol.472(7), pp.2307-2307
    Description: Byline: Charles L. Nelson (1), Robert B. Jones (2), Nathaniel C. Wingert (2), Michael Foltzer (3), Thomas R. Bowen (2) Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, 1 Cupp Pavilion, 51 N 39th Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA (2) Department of Orthopaedics, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA, USA (3) Division of Infectious Disease, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA, USA Article History: Registration Date: 02/04/2014 Online Date: 19/04/2014 Article note: The online version of the original article can be found under doi: 10.1007/s11999-014-3571-4. The online version of the original article can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11999-014-3571-4.
    Keywords: Antibiotics -- Health Aspects ; Prostheses And Implants -- Health Aspects ; Medical Research -- Health Aspects ; Cross Infection -- Health Aspects;
    ISSN: 0009-921X
    E-ISSN: 15281132
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Tennessee Historical Quarterly, 1 April 2012, Vol.71(1), pp.46-69
    Keywords: Behavioral sciences -- Sociology -- Human societies ; Law -- Legal rights -- Civil rights ; Political science -- Politics -- Political processes ; Political science -- Government -- Government officials ; Behavioral sciences -- Anthropology -- Ethnology ; Political science -- Government -- Government officials ; Social sciences -- Population studies -- Human populations ; Political science -- Political organizations -- Political parties ; Political science -- Politics -- Political processes ; Behavioral sciences -- Sociology -- Human societies
    ISSN: 00403261
    Source: Archival Journals (JSTOR)
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: European Journal of Pharmacology, 15 April 2014, Vol.729, pp.59-66
    Description: The effects of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, linagliptin, alone and in combination with voglibose or exendin-4, on glycaemic control and body weight were assessed in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Voglibose is an α-glucosidase inhibitor but also increases glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Exendin-4 is a GLP-1 receptor agonist. Male Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats were dosed for 3 days, fasted overnight and a sucrose/glucose tolerance test was performed. Linagliptin (1 mg/kg po) improved glucose tolerance by increasing plasma GLP-1 (active) and insulin secretion, whilst having no effect on body weight. Voglibose (1 and 10 mg/kg po) reduced body weight, improved glycaemic control, reduced plasma insulin and increased total but not active GLP-1. The combination of linagliptin and voglibose significantly reduced body weight, improved glycaemic control and reduced plasma insulin compared to linagliptin alone. Furthermore, linagliptin plus voglibose produced a marked increase in GLP-1 (active) at 5 min post-sucrose, compared to linagliptin, possibly because linagliptin prevented the degradation of GLP-1 secreted in response to voglibose. Exendin-4 (10 μg/kg sc) significantly reduced body weight, improved glucose tolerance but reduced GLP-1 (active). The combination of linagliptin and exendin-4 significantly reduced body weight and improved glycaemic control but had no effect on plasma GLP-1. Overall it did not markedly improve glycaemic control compared to the individual drugs. The improved glucose control, reduced body weight and markedly increased plasma GLP-1 levels in animals given linagliptin with voglibose, suggests that this combination may be particularly beneficial in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.
    Keywords: Linagliptin ; Voglibose ; Exendin-4 ; Glp-1 ; Glucose Control ; Type 2 Diabetes ; Pharmacy, Therapeutics, & Pharmacology
    ISSN: 0014-2999
    E-ISSN: 1879-0712
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, Feb, 2011, Vol.24(1), p.11(5)
    Description: To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6171.2010.00262.x Byline: Muhammad Waqar Azeem, Akashdeep Aujla, Michelle Rammerth, Gary Binsfeld, Robert B. Jones Keywords: Adolescents; children; psychiatric hospital; restraint; seclusion; trauma informed care Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of six core strategies based on trauma informed care in reducing the use of seclusion and restraints with hospitalized youth. METHODS: The hospital staff received training in March 2005 in six core strategies that are based on trauma informed care. Medical records were reviewed for youth admitted between July 2004 and March 2007. Data were collected on demographics, including age, gender, ethnicity, number of admissions, type of admissions, length of stay, psychiatric diagnosis, number of seclusions, and restraints. RESULTS: Four hundred fifty-eight youth (females 276/males 182) were admitted between July 2004 and March 2007. Seventy-nine patients or 17.2% (females 44/males 35) required 278 seclusions/restraints (159 seclusions/119 restraints), with average number of episodes 3.5/patient (range 1-28). Thirty-seven children and adolescents placed in seclusion and/or restraints had three or more episodes. In the first six months of study, the number of seclusions/restraints episodes were 93 (73 seclusions/20 restraints), involving 22 children and adolescents (females 11/males 11). Comparatively, in final six months of study following the training program, there were 31 episodes (6 seclusions/25 restraints) involving 11 children and adolescents (females 7/males 4). The major diagnoses of the youth placed in seclusion and/or restraints were disruptive behavior disorders (61%) and mood disorders (52%). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows downward trend in seclusions/restraints among hospitalized youth after implementation of National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors six core strategies based on trauma informed care. Article note: Muhammad.Azeem@ct.gov, with a copy to the Editor: poster@uta.edu
    Keywords: Psychiatric Hospitals -- Analysis ; Mental Disorders -- Analysis
    ISSN: 1073-6077
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 12/23/1988, Vol.260(24), p.3590
    Description: 〈p〉To the Editor.—Lovastatin is a remarkable drug. Better than any other medication yet available, lovastatin promptly lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, with few apparent side effects. When I and my internist colleagues in west central Maine began prescribing lovastatin in October 1987, we were struck soon by what seemed like an unusual incidence of chest pain in patients recently started on therapy with the drug.In November 1987 one of 18 and in December 1987 seven of 20 admissions to Franklin Memorial Hospital for chest pain involved patients taking lovastatin. In three cases (two individual patients), starting lovastatin therapy did not seem to have changed the previous tempo of coronary symptoms. However, five patients with severe coronary atherosclerosis experienced a distinct acceleration of coronary symptoms between five and 49 days after starting lovastatin therapy; four developed newly unstable angina and one suffered an acute myocardial infarction. Was this a〈/p〉
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0098-7484
    E-ISSN: 15383598
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