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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Lasers in surgery and medicine, September 2014, Vol.46(7), pp.558-62
    Description: To evaluate the clinical value of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for a real-time thermo-monitoring during laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in kidneys. Twenty-eight ex vivo pig kidneys were treated with laser ablation under MR guidance in a high-field MR scanner (Magnetom Espree or Avanto Fit, Siemens, Germany). For the thermal ablation of the kidney, a neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used in combination with a special protective catheter (length 43 cm, 4 French) which is sealed at the distal end. First, ablation was performed for 7, 10, and 13 minutes using FLASH sequences for investigation of time-dependent growth of lesion size. In the second step, we evaluated the optimal imaging sequence during a 7 minutes ablation of the kidney and after cooling using four different MR sequences (Haste, FLASH, radial VIBE, and Caipirinha DIXON). Macroscopic lesion volume increased from 3,784 ± 1,525 mm(3) to 7,683 ± 5,756 mm(3) after the ablation from 7 to 13 minutes and MR volume ranged from 2,107 ± 1,674 mm(3) to 2,934 ± 1,549 mm(3) after the ablation from 7 to 13 minutes. During ablation, FLASH (132 ± 34%) and radial VIBE (120 ± 43%) sequences displayed lesion volumes most efficiently with a trend to overestimation. The Caipirinha DIXON (323 ± 24%) sequence overestimated the volumes significantly during real-time monitoring. The volumes measured by MRI with FLASH (61 ± 30%), Haste (67 ± 28%), or radial VIBE (48 ± 14%) sequences after cooling of the kidney after ablation were always underestimated. The Caipirinha DIXON (142 ± 2%) sequence still overestimated the lesion volume after cooling of the kidney. LITT is a feasible ablation modality in kidney tissue. Moreover, macroscopic and MR lesion volume increases time-dependently. For online monitoring, radial VIBE and FLASH sequences seem to be most efficient.
    Keywords: Litt ; Mri ; Laser Ablation ; Real-Time Monitoring ; Renal Cancer ; Thermometry ; Surgery, Computer-Assisted ; Hyperthermia, Induced -- Methods ; Kidney -- Surgery ; Laser Therapy -- Methods ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging -- Methods
    E-ISSN: 1096-9101
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, 2014, Vol.46(7), p.558(5)
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lsm.22262/abstract Byline: Stefan Vallo, Katrin Eichler, Kathrin Kelly, Boris Schulz, Georg Bartsch, Axel Haferkamp, Thomas J Vogl, Stephan Zangos Purpose To evaluate the clinical value of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for a real-time thermo-monitoring during laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in kidneys. Methods Twenty-eight ex vivo pig kidneys were treated with laser ablation under MR guidance in a high-field MR scanner (Magnetom Espree or Avanto Fit, Siemens, Germany). For the thermal ablation of the kidney, a neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used in combination with a special protective catheter (length 43cm, 4 French) which is sealed at the distal end. First, ablation was performed for 7, 10, and 13minutes using FLASH sequences for investigation of time-dependent growth of lesion size. In the second step, we evaluated the optimal imaging sequence during a 7minutes ablation of the kidney and after cooling using four different MR sequences (Haste, FLASH, radial VIBE, and Caipirinha DIXON). Results Macroscopic lesion volume increased from 3,784[+ or -]1,525mm.sub.3 to 7,683[+ or -]5,756mm.sub.3 after the ablation from 7 to 13minutes and MR volume ranged from 2,107[+ or -]1,674mm.sub.3 to 2,934[+ or -]1,549mm.sub.3 after the ablation from 7 to 13minutes. During ablation, FLASH (132[+ or -]34%) and radial VIBE (120[+ or -]43%) sequences displayed lesion volumes most efficiently with a trend to overestimation. The Caipirinha DIXON (323[+ or -]24%) sequence overestimated the volumes significantly during real-time monitoring. The volumes measured by MRI with FLASH (61[+ or -]30%), Haste (67[+ or -]28%), or radial VIBE (48[+ or -]14%) sequences after cooling of the kidney after ablation were always underestimated. The Caipirinha DIXON (142[+ or -]2%) sequence still overestimated the lesion volume after cooling of the kidney. Conclusion LITT is a feasible ablation modality in kidney tissue. Moreover, macroscopic and MR lesion volume increases time-dependently. For online monitoring, radial VIBE and FLASH sequences seem to be most efficient. Lasers Surg. Med. 46:558-562, 2014. [c] 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Article Note: Conflict of Interest Disclosures: All authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none were reported.
    Keywords: Magnetic Alloys – Evaluation ; Magnetic Alloys – Comparative Analysis ; Rare Earth Metals – Evaluation ; Rare Earth Metals – Comparative Analysis ; Ablation (Surgery) – Comparative Analysis ; Rare Earth Metal Compounds – Evaluation ; Rare Earth Metal Compounds – Comparative Analysis ; Diagnostic Imaging – Comparative Analysis ; Lasers – Evaluation ; Lasers – Comparative Analysis
    ISSN: 0196-8092
    E-ISSN: 10969101
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  • 3
    In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, September 2014, Vol.46(7), pp.558-562
    Keywords: Laser Ablation ; Litt ; Mri ; Real‐Time Monitoring ; Renal Cancer ; Thermometry
    ISSN: 0196-8092
    E-ISSN: 1096-9101
    Source: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2010, Vol.5(9), p.e13027
    Description: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disorder of chronic inflammation with increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. The etiology of IBD is unclear but thought to result from a dysregulated adaptive and innate immune response to microbial products in a genetically susceptible host. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling induced by intestinal commensal bacteria plays a crucial role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, innate immunity and the enhancement of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) integrity. However, the role of TLR2 in the development of colorectal cancer has not been studied. We utilized the AOM-DSS model for colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) in wild type (WT) and TLR2 −/− mice. Colons harvested from WT and TLR2 −/− mice were used for histopathology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and cytokine analysis. Mice deficient in TLR2 developed significantly more and larger colorectal tumors than their WT controls. We provide evidence that colonic epithelium of TLR2 −/− mice have altered immune responses and dysregulated proliferation under steady-state conditions and during colitis, which lead to inflammatory growth signals and predisposition to accelerated neoplastic growth. At the earliest time-points assessed, TLR2 −/− colons exhibited a significant increase in aberrant crypt foci (ACF), resulting in tumors that developed earlier and grew larger. In addition, the intestinal microenvironment revealed significantly higher levels of IL-6 and IL-17A concomitant with increased phospho-STAT3 within ACF. These observations indicate that in colitis, TLR2 plays a protective role against the development of CAC.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Immunology ; Immunology -- Immune Response ; Immunology -- Immunomodulation ; Immunology -- Innate Immunity ; Immunology -- Leukocyte Activation
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Research in Marketing, December 2012, Vol.29(4), pp.355-362
    Description: Exposure to thin models results in self-esteem shifts that influence people's motivation to diet. This research study applies a goal perspective to explain the effect of exposure to thin models on dieters' motivation to lose weight. Two (one-week) weight loss program studies that included treatment conditions in which participants were repeatedly exposed to either a thin model or to control conditions with either a neutral dieting-related cue (Study 1) or a normal-sized model (Study 2) were conducted. Female participants who were exposed to the thin model perceived their dieting goals as less attainable, engaged in more goal-inconsistent behavior (i.e., consuming unhealthy snacks), and had less success losing weight. The effect of exposure to thin models on weight loss success is mediated specifically by the perceived attainability of the thin ideal.
    Keywords: Thinness Ideal ; Exposure to Models ; Self-Concept ; Goal Attainability ; Business
    ISSN: 0167-8116
    E-ISSN: 1873-8001
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nutrition Research, June 2013, Vol.33(6), pp.479-486
    Description: Oral ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (bicarbonate loading) has acute ergogenic effects on short-duration, high-intensity exercise. Because sodium bicarbonate is 27% sodium, ergogenic doses (ie, 300 mg∙kg ) result in sodium intakes well above the Dietary Reference Intakes upper limit of 2300 mg/day. Therefore, it is conceivable that bicarbonate loading could have hypertensive effects. Therefore, we performed a double-blind crossover trial to evaluate the hypothesis that bicarbonate loading increases resting and exercise blood pressure (BP). A secondary hypothesis was that bicarbonate loading causes gastrointestinal distress. Eleven endurance-trained men and women (exercise frequency, 4.6 ± 0.4 sessions/wk; duration, 65 ± 6 min/session) underwent testing on two occasions in random sequence: once after bicarbonate loading (300 mg∙kg ) and once after placebo ingestion. BP and heart rate were measured before bicarbonate or placebo consumption, 30 minutes after consumption, during 20 min of steady state submaximal cycling exercise, and during recovery. Bicarbonate loading did not affect systolic BP during rest, exercise, or recovery ( = .38 for main treatment effect). However, it resulted in modestly higher diastolic BP (main treatment effect, +3.3 ± 1.1 mmHg, = .01) and higher heart rate (main treatment effect, +10.1 ± 2.4 beats per minute, = .002). Global ratings of gastrointestinal distress severity (0-10 scale) were greater after bicarbonate ingestion (5.1 ± 0.5 vs 0.5 ± 0.2, 〈 .0001). Furthermore, 10 of the 11 subjects (91%) experienced diarrhea, 64% experience bloating and thirst, and 45% experienced nausea after bicarbonate loading. In conclusion, although a single, ergogenic dose of sodium bicarbonate does not appear to have acute, clinically important effects on resting or exercise BP, it does cause substantial gastrointestinal distress.
    Keywords: Exercise ; Diarrhea ; Blood Pressure ; Sodium ; Sodium Bicarbonate ; Human ; Anatomy & Physiology ; Diet & Clinical Nutrition
    ISSN: 0271-5317
    E-ISSN: 1879-0739
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  • 7
    In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2015, Vol.47(5S Suppl 1), pp.372-372
    ISSN: 0195-9131
    Source: Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. All rights reserved.〈img src=http://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/LWW%20logo.png style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: 2015, Vol.10(1), p.e0117556
    Description: Clinical studies suggest that short-term insulin treatment in new-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) can promote prolonged glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model to examine such a “legacy” effect of early insulin therapy (EIT) in long-term glycemic control in new-onset T2DM. The objective of the study was to investigate the role of diet following onset of diabetes in the favorable outcomes of EIT. ; As such, C57BL6/J male mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 21 weeks to induce diabetes and then received 4 weeks of daily insulin glargine or sham subcutaneous injections. Subsequently, mice were either kept on the HFD or switched to a low-fat diet (LFD) for 4 additional weeks. ; Mice fed a HFD gained significant fat mass and displayed increased leptin levels, increasing insulin resistance (poor HOMA-IR) and worse glucose tolerance test (GTT) performance in comparison to mice fed a LFD, as expected. Insulin-treated diabetic mice but maintained on the HFD demonstrated even greater weight gain and insulin resistance compared to sham-treated mice. However, insulin-treated mice switched to the LFD exhibited a better HOMA-IR compared to those mice left on a HFD. Further, between the insulin-treated and sham control mice, in spite of similar HOMA-IR values, the insulin-treated mice switched to a LFD following insulin therapy did demonstrate significantly better HOMA-B% values than sham control and insulin-treated HFD mice. ; Early insulin treatment in HFD-induced T2DM in C57BL6/J mice was only beneficial in animals that were switched to a LFD after insulin treatment which may explain why a similar legacy effect in humans is achieved clinically in only a portion of cases studied, emphasizing a vital role for diet adherence in diabetes control.
    Keywords: Research Article
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 05 September 2017, Vol.114(36), pp.9629-9634
    Description: Activating mutations in BRAF are found in 50% of melanomas and although treatment with BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) is effective, resistance often develops. We now show that recently discovered NRAS isoform 2 is up-regulated in the setting of BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma, in both cell lines and patient tumor tissues. When isoform 2 was overexpressed in BRAF mutant melanoma cell lines, melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth were significantly increased in the presence of BRAFi treatment. shRNA-mediated knockdown of isoform 2 in BRAFi resistant cells restored sensitivity to BRAFi compared with controls. Signaling analysis indicated decreased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signaling and increased phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway signaling in isoform 2 overexpressing cells compared with isoform 1 overexpressing cells. Immunoprecipitation of isoform 2 validated a binding affinity of this isoform to both PI3K and BRAF/RAF1. The addition of an AKT inhibitor to BRAFi treatment resulted in a partial restoration of BRAFi sensitivity in cells expressing high levels of isoform 2. NRAS isoform 2 may contribute to resistance to BRAFi by facilitating PI3K pathway activation.
    Keywords: Braf ; Nras ; Melanoma ; Resistance ; Vemurafenib ; Gtp Phosphohydrolases -- Genetics ; Melanoma -- Drug Therapy ; Membrane Proteins -- Genetics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-Raf -- Antagonists & Inhibitors ; Skin Neoplasms -- Drug Therapy
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, December 2016, Vol.138(6), pp.1722-1725.e6
    Description: References1 Genome Res 21 2011 936 939 Stampy: a statistical algorithm for sensitive and fast mapping of Illumina sequence reads Lunter G. Goodson M. 2 Nat Genet 46 2014 912 918 Integrating mapping-, assembly- and haplotype-based approaches for calling variants in clinical sequencing applications Rimmer A. Phan H. Mathieson I. Iqbal Z. Twigg S.R.F. Wilkie A.O.M. 3 Available at: www.evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/. 4 Wallis Y, Payne S, McAnulty C, Bodmer D, Sistermans E, Robertson K, et al. Practice Guidelines for the Evaluation of Pathogenicity and the Reporting of Sequence Variants in Clinical Molecular Genetics. Available at: http://www.acgs.uk.com/committees/quality-committee/best-practice-guidelines/. 5 Nature 510 2014 288 292 CTP synthase 1 deficiency in humans reveals its central role in lymphocyte proliferation Martin E. Palmic N. Sanquer S. Lenoir C. Hauck F. Mongellaz C. 6 Cytometry B Clin Cytom 78B 2010 372 381 B cell subsets in healthy children: reference values for evaluation of B cell maturation process in peripheral blood Piątosa B. Wolska-Kuśnierz B. Pac M. Siewiera K. Gałkowska E. Bernatowska E. 7 J Allergy Clin Immunol 112 2003 973 980 Lymphocyte subsets in healthy children from birth through 18 years of age: the pediatric AIDS clinical trials group P1009 study Shearer W.T. Rosenblatt H.M. Gelman R.S. Oymopito R. Plaeger S. Stiehm E.R. 8 Scand J Immunol 75 2012 436 444 Paediatric reference values for the peripheral T cell compartment Schatorjé E.J.H. Gemen E.F.A. Driessen G.J.A. Leuvenink J. van Hout R.W.N.M. de Vries E.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0091-6749
    E-ISSN: 1097-6825
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