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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 21 June 2011, Vol.108(25), pp.10260-5
    Description: Loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel function causes cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. CFTR is expressed in airway epithelia, but how CF alters electrolyte transport across airway epithelia has remained uncertain. Recent studies of a porcine model showed that in vivo, excised, and cultured CFTR(-/-) and CFTR(ΔF508/ΔF508) airway epithelia lacked anion conductance, and they did not hyperabsorb Na(+). Therefore, we asked whether Cl(-) and Na(+) conductances were altered in human CF airway epithelia. We studied differentiated primary cultures of tracheal/bronchial epithelia and found that transepithelial conductance (Gt) under basal conditions and the cAMP-stimulated increase in Gt were markedly attenuated in CF epithelia compared with non-CF epithelia. These data reflect loss of the CFTR anion conductance. In CF and non-CF epithelia, the Na(+) channel inhibitor amiloride produced similar reductions in Gt and Na(+) absorption, indicating that Na(+) conductance in CF epithelia did not exceed that in non-CF epithelia. Consistent with previous reports, adding amiloride caused greater reductions in transepithelial voltage and short-circuit current in CF epithelia than in non-CF epithelia; these changes are attributed to loss of a Cl(-) conductance. These results indicate that Na(+) conductance was not increased in these cultured CF tracheal/bronchial epithelia and point to loss of anion transport as key to airway epithelial dysfunction in CF.
    Keywords: Chlorides -- Metabolism ; Cystic Fibrosis -- Physiopathology ; Epithelium -- Metabolism ; Respiratory Mucosa -- Metabolism ; Sodium -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2011, Vol.108(25), pp.10260-10265
    Description: Loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel function causes cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. CFTR is expressed in airway epithelia, but how CF alters electrolyte transport across airway epithelia has remained uncertain. Recent studies of a porcine model showed that in vivo, excised, and cultured CFTR⁻/⁻ and CFTRΔF⁵⁰⁸/ΔF⁵⁰⁸ airway epithelia lacked anion conductance, and they did not hyperabsorb Na⁺. Therefore, we asked whether Cl⁻ and Na⁺ conductances were altered in human CF airway epithelia. We studied differentiated primary cultures of tracheal/bronchial epithelia and found that transepithelial conductance (Gt) under basal conditions and the cAMP-stimulated increase in Gt were markedly attenuated in CF epithelia compared with non-CF epithelia. These data reflect loss of the CFTR anion conductance. In CF and non-CF epithelia, the Na⁺ channel inhibitor amiloride produced similar reductions in Gt and Na⁺ absorption, indicating that Na⁺ conductance in CF epithelia did not exceed that in non-CF epithelia. Consistent with previous reports, adding amiloride caused greater reductions in transepithelial voltage and short-circuit current in CF epithelia than in non-CF epithelia; these changes are attributed to loss of a Cl⁻ conductance. These results indicate that Na⁺ conductance was not increased in these cultured CF tracheal/bronchial epithelia and point to loss of anion transport as key to airway epithelial dysfunction in CF. ; p. 10260-10265.
    Keywords: Sodium Channels ; Models ; Cystic Fibrosis ; Absorption ; Chlorides ; Electrolytes ; Humans ; Sodium ; Swine ; Epithelium
    ISSN: 0027-8424
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Chest, July 2014, Vol.146(1), pp.4-6
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0012-3692
    E-ISSN: 1931-3543
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Chest, 07/2014, Vol.146(1), pp.4-6
    ISSN: 00123692
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, November 2014, Vol.98(5), pp.1849-1849
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2014.06.079 Byline: Michael Eberlein, Kalpaj Parekh, Sif Hansdottir, John Keech, Julia Klesney-Tait Author Affiliation: University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa
    Keywords: Bronchitis ; Organ Transplantation;
    ISSN: 0003-4975
    E-ISSN: 1552-6259
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(1), p.e16166
    Description: Diabetes mellitus predisposes the host to bacterial infections. Moreover, hyperglycemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for respiratory infections. The luminal surface of airway epithelia is covered by a thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) and is normally sterile despite constant exposure to bacteria. The balance between bacterial growth and killing in the airway determines the outcome of exposure to inhaled or aspirated bacteria: infection or sterility. We hypothesized that restriction of carbon sources –including glucose– in the ASL is required for sterility of the lungs. We found that airway epithelia deplete glucose from the ASL via a novel mechanism involving polarized expression of GLUT-1 and GLUT-10, intracellular glucose phosphorylation, and low relative paracellular glucose permeability in well-differentiated cultures of human airway epithelia and in segments of airway epithelia excised from human tracheas. Moreover, we found that increased glucose concentration in the ASL augments growth of P. aeruginosa in vitro and in the lungs of hyperglycemic ob/ob and db/db mice in vivo . In contrast, hyperglycemia had no effect on intrapulmonary bacterial growth of a P. aeruginosa mutant that is unable to utilize glucose as a carbon source. Our data suggest that depletion of glucose in the airway epithelial surface is a novel mechanism for innate immunity. This mechanism is important for sterility of the airways and has implications in hyperglycemia and conditions that result in disruption of the epithelial barrier in the lung.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Immunology ; Diabetes And Endocrinology ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Respiratory Medicine ; Biochemistry
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Chest, May 2015, Vol.147(5), pp.1435-1443
    Description: Lung transplantation is an effective therapy for many patients with end-stage lung disease. Few centers across the United States offer this therapy, as a successful lung transplant program requires significant institutional resources and specialized personnel. Analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database reveals that the failure rate of new programs exceeds 40%. These data suggest that an accurate assessment of program viability as well as a strategy to continuously assess defined quality measures is needed. As part of strategic planning, regional availability of recipient and donors should be assessed. Additionally, analysis of institutional expertise at the physician, support staff, financial, and administrative levels is necessary. In May of 2007, we started a new lung transplant program at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and have performed 101 transplants with an average recipient 1-year survival of 91%, placing our program among the top in the country for the past 5 years. Herein, we review internal and external factors that impact the viability of a new lung transplant program. We discuss the use of four prospectively identified quality measures: volume, recipient outcomes, financial solvency, and academic contribution as one approach to achieve programmatic excellence.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0012-3692
    E-ISSN: 1931-3543
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 15 August 2013, Vol.188(4), pp.410-2
    Keywords: Brain Death ; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation ; Lung Transplantation ; Tissue Donors ; Heart Arrest -- Mortality
    ISSN: 1073449X
    E-ISSN: 1535-4970
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Clinics in Chest Medicine, December 2017, Vol.38(4), pp.761-770
    Description: Mycobacterial infections are uncommon in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients but carry significant morbidity and mortality. Donor screening strategies for tuberculosis should be emphasized in high-risk populations. Both tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections can have pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations of infections. Recommended treatment regimens typically involve multiple drugs with significant adverse effects and drug interactions.
    Keywords: Mycobacterium Tuberculosis ; Nontuberculous Mycobacteria ; Transplantation ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0272-5231
    E-ISSN: 1557-8216
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Chest, October 2010, Vol.138(4), pp.44A-44A
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0012-3692
    E-ISSN: 1931-3543
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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