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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Acta Theologica : Good news for the poor and the sick : Supplementum 16, 2012, pp.1-16
    Description: The article focuses on the beatitude of the poor in the social and religious context of historical Jesus. The original version of this makarism has to be seen as a religious statement which is not meant as a program of social reform. Yet it has political and socio-ethical implications as it connects the poor with God and his kingdom. Those who are searching God have to go to the poor. A possible function of the beatitude of the poor in the struggle against poverty can be seen in the spiritual empowerment it gives to the poor themselves: Poverty is against God's will; it is no divine punishment and does not separate from God. The poor will be liberated from suffering. Poverty has no place in the kingdom but will be eradicated.
    Keywords: Beatitude of the Poor ; Gospel ; Poor ; Saligspreking Oor Die Armes ; Evangelie ; Armmoede
    ISSN: 10158758
    Source: African Electronic Journals (Sabinet SA ePublications)
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, July 27, 2015, Vol.10(7)
    Description: Background Long-term therapies such as disease modifying therapy for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) demand high levels of medication adherence in order to reach acceptable outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe adherence to four disease modifying drugs (DMDs) among statutorily insured patients within two years following treatment initiation. These drugs were interferon beta-1a i.m. (Avonex), interferon beta-1a s.c. (Rebif), interferon beta-1b s.c. (Betaferon) and glatiramer acetate s.c. (Copaxone). Methods This retrospective cohort study used pharmacy claims data from the data warehouse of the German Institute for Drug Use Evaluation (DAPI) from 2001 through 2009. New or renewed DMD prescriptions in the years 2002 to 2006 were identified and adherence was estimated during 730 days of follow-up by analyzing the medication possession ratio (MPR) as proxy for compliance and persistence defined as number of days from initiation of DMD therapy until discontinuation or interruption. Findings A total of 52,516 medication profiles or therapy cycles (11,891 Avonex, 14,060 Betaferon, 12,353 Copaxone and 14,212 Rebif) from 50,057 patients were included into the analysis. Among the 4 cohorts, no clinically relevant differences were found in available covariates. The Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) measured overall compliance, which was 39.9% with a threshold MPR[greater than or equal to]0.8. There were small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was compliant for the following medications: Avonex (42.8%), Betaferon (40.6%), Rebif (39.2%), and Copaxone (37%). Overall persistence was 32.3% at the end of the 24 months observation period, i.e. during only one third of all included therapy cycles patients did not discontinue or interrupt DMD therapy. There were also small differences in the proportion of therapy cycles during which a patient was persistent as follows: Avonex (34.2%), Betaferon (33.4%), Rebif (31.7%) and Copaxone (29.8%). Conclusions Two years after initiating MS-modifying therapy, only 30-40% of patients were adherent to DMDs.
    Keywords: Multiple Sclerosis -- Drug Therapy ; Biological Response Modifiers ; Drugs ; Pharmacy ; Medical Research ; Viral Antigens ; Interferon Beta ; Patient Compliance ; Drugstores
    ISSN: 1932-6203
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2017, Vol.12(6), p.e0178591
    Description: The increase in the number of patients presenting with osteoarthritis in the past decade has led to a 32% increase in knee replacement surgeries designed to reduce restrictions on patient movement and improve their quality of life. Patient satisfaction is becoming an increasingly important indicator of quality of care. This study was designed to identify predictors of various service components in the treatment process and hospital key performance indicators significantly associated with patient satisfaction.A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted with 856 patients having their primary total knee replacements at 41 hospitals. Patient satisfaction was queried via a validated, multidimensional questionnaire mainly using a six-point scale. In addition to bivariate calculations, patient satisfaction was the dependent variable in a binary logistic regression model.The bivariate analysis showed a strong association between satisfaction and sex (male or female), the patients' health before admission, and the length of stay. The number of cases treated at each hospital did not reveal any impact on satisfaction. The multivariate analysis identified three predictors associated with overall satisfaction. The strongest factor was the treatment outcome and the weakest was the quality of food. It became apparent that the statutory procedure minimums were not being met.The relevant factors influencing patient satisfaction were partially the same as previous study results and allowed more detailed conclusions. The results provide suggestions across hospitals that could help health care providers better meet needs of patients after knee arthroplasties.
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    In: Stroke, 2011, Vol.42(4), pp.e358-e358
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0039-2499
    E-ISSN: 15244628
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  • 5
    In: Stroke, 2014, Vol.45(3), pp.e36-e37
    Description: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be used to improve the function and activities of daily living (ADL) after stroke. To assess the effects of tDCS on ADL and motor function in people with stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (March 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library, May 2013), MEDLINE (1948 to May 2013), EMBASE (1980 to May 2013), CINAHL (1982 to May 2013), …
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0039-2499
    E-ISSN: 15244628
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  • 6
    In: Stroke, 2013, Vol.44(10), pp.e127-e128
    Description: Improving walking after stroke is one of the main goals of rehabilitation. Electromechanical-assisted gait training uses specialist machines to assist walking practice and might help to improve walking after stroke. Our systematic review examined the effects of electromechanical and robotic-assisted gait training devices for improving walking after stroke and also assessed the acceptability and safety of this type of therapy. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched April 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to November 2012), EMBASE (1980 to November …
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0039-2499
    E-ISSN: 15244628
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  • 7
    In: Stroke, 2012, Vol.43(12), pp.e172-e173
    Description: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE—: More than two thirds of all patients after stroke have difficulties with reduced arm function. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training devices are used in rehabilitation and might help to improve arm function after stroke. Our systematic review examined the effectiveness of electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for improving generic activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength in patients after stroke and also assessed the acceptability and safety of the therapy. METHODS—: We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group’s Trials Register (last searched July 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 7), MEDLINE (1950 to July 2011), EMBASE (1980 to July 2011), CINAHL (1982 to July 2011), AMED (1985 to July 2011), SPORTDiscus (1949 to July 2011), PEDro (searched August 2011), COMPENDEX (1972 to July 2011), and INSPEC (1969 to July 2011). We also hand-searched relevant conference proceedings, searched trials and research registers, checked reference lists, and contacted trialists, experts, and researchers in our field as well as manufacturers of commercial devices. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted the data. The primary outcome was activities of daily living; secondary outcomes were impairments such as motor function and motor strength. To minimize bias we included only randomized controlled trials comparing electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for recovery of arm function with other rehabilitation interventions or no treatment. RESULTS—: We included 19 trials (involving 666 participants) in this review. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training did improve activities of daily living (standardized mean difference, 0.43, 95% CI, 0.11–0.75; P=0.009; I=67%; Figure) as well as arm function (standardized mean difference, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.20–0.69; P=0.0004; I=45%), but arm muscle strength did not improve (standardized mean difference, 0.48, 95% CI, −0.06 to 1.03; P=0.08; I=79%). Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training did not increase the risk of patients to dropout (risk difference, 0.00; 95% CI, −0.04 to 0.04; P=0.82; I=0.0%), and adverse events were rare. CONCLUSIONS—: Patients who receive electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training after stroke are more likely to improve their generic activities of daily living. Paretic arm function may also improve, but not arm muscle strength. However, the results must be interpreted with caution because there were variations between the trials in the duration and amount of training, type of treatment, and in the patient characteristics.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0039-2499
    E-ISSN: 15244628
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Public Health, 2016, Vol.24(1), pp.1-1
    Description: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10389-015-0704-5 Byline: Joachim Kugler (1) Author Affiliation: (1) Medizinische Fakultat, Lehrstuhl fur Gesundheitswissenschaften/Public Health, TU Dresden, Fetscherstra[sz]e 74, 01307, Dresden, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 27/11/2015 Online Date: 30/12/2015 Article note: Joachim Kugler, M.D., Dipl.-Psych., the new editor-in-chief of the Journal of Public Health, has been full professor for Health Sciences/Public Health at the TU Dresden, Germany, since 1999.
    Keywords: Medicine & Public Health ; Public Health ; Health Promotion and Disease Prevention ; Epidemiology ; Public Health;
    ISSN: 2198-1833
    E-ISSN: 1613-2238
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  • 9
    In: Stroke, 2017, Vol.48(8), pp.e188-e189
    Keywords: Follow-Up Studies ; Gait ; Rehabilitation ; Stroke ; Walking;
    ISSN: 0039-2499
    E-ISSN: 15244628
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Church History and Religious Culture, 2016, Vol.96(1-2), pp.179-181
    Keywords: Religion
    ISSN: 1871-241X
    E-ISSN: 1871-2428
    Source: Brill Online Journals
    Source: Brill Online
    Source: Brill.com (Brill Online)
    Source: Brill Online Journals〈img src=https://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/BRILL_120x24_v1_DEF.gif style="vertical-align:middle;margin-left:7px"〉
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