Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Article
    Article
    In: Journal for the Study of Judaism, 11/25/2015, Vol.46(4-5), p.599
    ISSN: Journal for the Study of Judaism
    E-ISSN: 0047-2212
    Source: Brill Academic Publishers
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: BioScience May 2013, Vol.63(5), pp.317-317
    Description: Recently, Pedlar et al. (2012) stated that assisted migration in forestry (forestry AM) differs from species-rescue-assisted migration (species rescue AM) because the risks of invasiveness, hybridization with local species, and spread of diseases are minimized in managed forests. The rationale behind this assertion for forestry AM is that it involves the translocation of populations within the existing geographic range of the species, whereas species rescue AM involves the introduction of exotic species. However, while we agree that forestry AM is less risky than species rescue AM for the recipient ecosystem, forestry AM can not only fail but can also incur enormous financial costs. The failure of efforts that involved planting maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aït) trees in Southwest France (Aquitaine) with seeds from more southerly populations from Portugal for production purposes is a textbook case. The climate variability in Aquitaine includes periods of intense frost that are sufficiently rare (every 10 to 20 years) to be overlooked when establishing tree populations. The frost of the winter of 1985, the most intense frost event since records began with temperatures dropping as low as -22 °C (Boisseaux, 1986), affecting about 350 km2 of tree plantations in the region (Doré & Varoquaux, 2006). The highest mortality related to frost was observed in populations harvested from Leiria in Portugal, for which nearby records show that the absolute minimum temperature was only -7.8 °C in the last 60 years. Climate averages over the last 30 years differ only slightly between Leiria and Aquitaine, which would erroneously suggest that samples from Portugal would have survived in the Aquitaine region. Newly emerging climates (Williams et al. 2007) and the uncertainty related to climate change extreme events (Easterling, 2000) will make the search for southern locations with climatic conditions similar to those of northern populations of trees extremely difficult. Policies of forest adaptation to climate change should account for extreme cold events in the target populations even if climate change will likely decrease the number of extreme cold events (Easterling, 2000), that remain in our opinion, the hidden element behind the maladaptation of southern populations to northern locations.
    Keywords: Biology;
    ISSN: 00063568
    E-ISSN: 15253244
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 2013, Vol.370(1), pp.653-669
    Description: Aims: Sediment retention by plant barriers initiates common strategies to conserve soil fertility or restore degraded terrains, including gullied ones. Differences in species performance for sediment retention have been studied but little is known about plant performance in retention when upscaling to plurispecific barriers. We investigated the role of morphological diversity of plant barriers in sediment retention in the context of eroded marly gullies. Methods: Fifteen plant barriers, composed of combinations of four morphologically contrasting species (grass, shrub, dwarf-shrub and juvenile tree) were tested for their sediment retention potential in an innovative life-size artificial concentrated runoff experiment. We studied the net effect of biodiversity and the role of morphological traits on sediment retention. Results: We found that grass barriers performed best to retain sediment and morphological diversity significantly impaired sediment retention. This negative effect may be due to runoff concentrating in the least flow-resistant areas (shrubs or trees), resulting in a localized increase in flow velocity and thus an overall decrease in sediment deposition. Conclusion: To initiate gully restoration by increasing sediment retention in their bed, morphologically homogeneous plant barriers should be favored. Plant diversity, useful for mid- and long-term restoration goals, should be considered later in the process.
    Keywords: Artificial concentrated runoff ; Sediment retention ; Net biodiversity effect ; Plant traits ; Ecological restoration ; Gully erosion
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Environmental Management, 15 August 2012, Vol.104, pp.91-92
    Description: Urban ecosystems are the most complex mosaics of vegetative land cover that can be found. In a recent paper, Francis and Lorimer (2011) evaluated the reconciliation potential of living roofs and walls. For these authors, these two techniques for habitat improvement have strong potential for urban reconciliation ecology. However they have some ecological and societal limitations such as the physical extreme environmental characteristics, the monetary investment and the cultural perceptions of urban nature. We are interested in their results and support their conclusions. However, for a considerable time, green roofs have been designed to provide urban greenery for buildings and the green roof market has only focused on extensive roof at a restricted scale within cities. Thus, we have strong doubts about the relevance of their use as possible integrated elements of the network. Furthermore, without dynamic progress in research and the implementation of well-thought-out policies, what will be the real capital gain from green roofs with respect to land-use complementation in cities? If we agree with Francis and Lorimer (2011) considering that urban reconciliation ecology between nature and citizens is a current major challenge, then “adaptive collaborative management” is a fundamental requirement.
    Keywords: Green Roof ; Urban Ecosystem ; Urban Biodiversity ; Reconciliation Ecology ; Adaptive Collaborative Management ; Environmental Sciences ; Economics
    ISSN: 0301-4797
    E-ISSN: 1095-8630
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Ecology, 2013, Vol.22, pp.2128-2142
    Keywords: Life Sciences ; Biology ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0962-1083
    E-ISSN: 1365-294X
    Source: Hyper Article en Ligne (CCSd)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    In: Journal for the Study of Judaism, 11/25/2015, Vol.46(4-5), p.587
    ISSN: Journal for the Study of Judaism
    E-ISSN: 0047-2212
    Source: Brill Academic Publishers
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Article
    Article
    In: Journal for the Study of Judaism, 11/25/2015, Vol.46(4-5), pp.599-600
    ISSN: Journal for the Study of Judaism
    E-ISSN: 0047-2212
    Source: Brill Academic Publishers
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Article
    Article
    In: Journal for the Study of Judaism, 11/25/2015, Vol.46(4-5), pp.581-582
    ISSN: Journal for the Study of Judaism
    E-ISSN: 0047-2212
    Source: Brill Academic Publishers
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha, June 2016, Vol.25(4), pp.274-298
    Description: This article examines how Judean authors writing in Egypt were shaped by their physical surroundings. Specifically, it asks how writing about Egypt while living in Egypt shaped the development of the exodus narrative. The study consists of a comparative study of four versions of the exodus story (Exod. 1–15) written in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt. In these texts we see several characteristics that connect them to the land of Egypt: a focus on time spent in Egypt as opposed to the journey to the promised land, the characterization of Moses as a leader instead of a lawgiver, and the increase in descriptions of the physical environment of Egypt. The appearance of these shared characteristics demonstrates the important role that Egypt played in their reformulations of a foundational Judean text. Further, this study provides a new way of thinking about biblical interpretation, a practice not only textual but also deeply connected to the physical environment.
    Keywords: Exodus ; Place ; Ptolemaic Egypt ; Roman Egypt ; Second Temple Judaism ; Religion
    ISSN: 0951-8207
    E-ISSN: 1745-5286
    Source: Sage Journals (Sage Publications)
    Source: SAGE HSS (Sage Publications)
    Source: SAGE Religion (Sage Publications)
    Source: SAGE Journals (Sage Publications)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    In: Journal of Biogeography, May 2013, Vol.40(5), pp.835-846
    Description: Byline: Pierre R. Gerard, Martina Temunovic, Julie Sannier, Paola Bertolino, Jean Dufour, Nathalie Frascaria-Lacoste, Juan F. Fernandez-Manjarres, Pauline Ladiges Keywords: Climate-driven selection; Europe; Fraxinus ; hybrid zones; Oleaceae; species distribution models Abstract Aim To examine mechanisms related to the formation of hybrid zones between the Mediterranean narrow-leaved ash tree Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl and the common ash Fraxinus excelsior L., a mostly temperate tree species, at the continental scale. Location Temperate and Mediterranean Europe and the western part of the Black Sea basin. Methods We used species distribution models to determine the potential zones of sympatry between the two species, which remain largely unknown. In addition, we analysed 58 populations and 456 samples of ash tree that spanned most of the distribution of the two species across Europe, and included both parental species and selected hybrid populations. Levels of hybridization in the 58 populations were estimated using 19 nuclear microsatellite loci, including six anonymous nuclear single sequence repeat (SSR) markers and 13 recently developed single sequence repeats from expressed RNA sequence tags (EST-SSRs). Results Bayesian assignment supported the notion of two separate gene pools regardless of the type of marker used, which suggest an ancient population structure. Populations located within the predicted overlap zones had intermediate levels of admixture with a tendency for hybrid populations to occur towards temperate areas. Selection analyses indicated that six of the EST-SSRs had been subjected to stabilizing selection whereas two others had been subjected to directional selection. Results of spatial filtering on the allele frequencies of the loci under directional selection suggest that the number of days of frost and summer temperatures are both ecological factors that can limit the extent of the hybrid zone. Moreover, areas associated with known or predicted hybrid zones showed abrupt changes in allele frequencies compared with the periphery of the distributions. Main conclusions Our analyses suggest that the hybrid structure in these closely related ash species is ancient and asymmetric and that climate-driven selection, in particular cold weather, can potentially limit the extent of hybrid populations. Author Affiliation: Supporting information: Additional Supporting Information may be found in the online version of this article As a service to our authors and readers, this journal provides supporting information supplied by the authors. Such materials are peer-reviewed and may be re-organized for online delivery, but are not copy-edited or typeset. Technical support issues arising from supporting information (other than missing files) should be addressed to the authors.
    Keywords: Climate‐Driven Selection ; Europe ; Fraxinus ; Hybrid Zones ; Oleaceae ; Species Distribution Models
    ISSN: 0305-0270
    E-ISSN: 1365-2699
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages