Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 14 August 2012, Vol.109(33), pp.13452-7
    Description: How different organs are formed from small sets of undifferentiated precursor cells is a key question in developmental biology. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying organ specification in plants, we studied the function of the homeotic selector genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI), which control the formation of petals and stamens during Arabidopsis flower development. To this end, we characterized the activities of the transcription factors that AP3 and PI encode throughout flower development by using perturbation assays as well as transcript profiling and genomewide localization studies, in combination with a floral induction system that allows a stage-specific analysis of flower development by genomic technologies. We discovered considerable spatial and temporal differences in the requirement for AP3/PI activity during flower formation and show that they control different sets of genes at distinct phases of flower development. The genomewide identification of target genes revealed that AP3/PI act as bifunctional transcription factors: they activate genes involved in the control of numerous developmental processes required for organogenesis and repress key regulators of carpel formation. Our results imply considerable changes in the composition and topology of the gene network controlled by AP3/PI during the course of flower development. We discuss our results in light of a model for the mechanism underlying sex-determination in seed plants, in which AP3/PI orthologues might act as a switch between the activation of male and the repression of female development.
    Keywords: Arabidopsis -- Genetics ; Arabidopsis Proteins -- Metabolism ; Body Patterning -- Genetics ; Flowers -- Genetics ; Mads Domain Proteins -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.e17570
    Description: Second generation sequencing has prompted a number of groups to re-interrogate the transcriptomes of several bacterial and archaeal species. One of the central findings has been the identification of complex networks of small non-coding RNAs that play central roles in transcriptional regulation in all growth conditions and for the pathogen's interaction with and survival within host cells. Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular human pathogen with a distinct biphasic lifestyle. One of its primary environmental hosts in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and its infection by L. pneumophila mimics that seen in human macrophages. Here we present analysis of strand specific sequencing of the transcriptional response of L. pneumophila during exponential and post-exponential broth growth and during the replicative and transmissive phase of infection inside A. castellanii . We extend previous microarray based studies as well as uncovering evidence of a complex regulatory architecture underpinned by numerous non-coding RNAs. Over seventy new non-coding RNAs could be identified; many of them appear to be strain specific and in configurations not previously reported. We discover a family of non-coding RNAs preferentially expressed during infection conditions and identify a second copy of 6S RNA in L. pneumophila . We show that the newly discovered putative 6S RNA as well as a number of other non-coding RNAs show evidence for antisense transcription. The nature and extent of the non-coding RNAs and their expression patterns suggests that these may well play central roles in the regulation of Legionella spp. specific traits and offer clues as to how L. pneumophila adapts to its intracellular niche. The expression profiles outlined in the study have been deposited into Genbank's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under the series accession GSE27232.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Genetics And Genomics ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Computational Biology ; Ecology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 15 May 2012, Vol.109(20), pp.E1277-86
    Description: More than 50 y of research have provided great insight into the physiology, metabolism, and molecular biology of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), but important gaps in our knowledge remain. It is clear that a precise choreography of gene expression is required for Salmonella infection, but basic genetic information such as the global locations of transcription start sites (TSSs) has been lacking. We combined three RNA-sequencing techniques and two sequencing platforms to generate a robust picture of transcription in S. Typhimurium. Differential RNA sequencing identified 1,873 TSSs on the chromosome of S. Typhimurium SL1344 and 13% of these TSSs initiated antisense transcripts. Unique findings include the TSSs of the virulence regulators phoP, slyA, and invF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RNA polymerase was bound to 70% of the TSSs, and two-thirds of these TSSs were associated with σ(70) (including phoP, slyA, and invF) from which we identified the -10 and -35 motifs of σ(70)-dependent S. Typhimurium gene promoters. Overall, we corrected the location of important genes and discovered 18 times more promoters than identified previously. S. Typhimurium expresses 140 small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) at early stationary phase, including 60 newly identified sRNAs. Almost half of the experimentally verified sRNAs were found to be unique to the Salmonella genus, and 〈20% were found throughout the Enterobacteriaceae. This description of the transcriptional map of SL1344 advances our understanding of S. Typhimurium, arguably the most important bacterial infection model.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Genetics ; Regulatory Sequences, Ribonucleic Acid -- Genetics ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Genetics ; Transcription, Genetic -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    In: Molecular Microbiology, November 2013, Vol.90(3), pp.612-629
    Description: is an emerging pathogen that is increasingly recognized as a relevant cause of human lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients. This highly antibiotic‐resistant mycobacterium is an exception within the rapidly growing mycobacteria, which are mainly saprophytic and non‐pathogenic organisms. manifests as either a smooth () or a rough () colony morphotype, which is of clinical importance as morphotypes are associated with more severe and persistent infections. To better understand the molecular mechanisms behind the / alterations, we analysed and variants of three isogenic  / pairs using an unbiased approach involving genome and transcriptome analyses, transcriptional fusions and integrating constructs. This revealed different small insertions, deletions (indels) or single nucleotide polymorphisms within the non‐ribosomal peptide synthase gene cluster or in the three variants, consistent with the transcriptional differences identified within this genomic locus that is implicated in the synthesis and transport of lyco‐eptido‐ipids (). In contrast to previous reports, the identification of clearly defined genetic lesions responsible for the loss of ‐production or transport makes a frequent switching back‐and‐forth between smooth and rough morphologies in highly unlikely, which is important for our understanding of persistent infections.
    Keywords: Peptides -- Chemical Properties ; Peptides -- Analysis ; Transcription (Genetics) -- Chemical Properties ; Transcription (Genetics) -- Analysis ; Lipids -- Chemical Properties ; Lipids -- Analysis ; Cystic Fibrosis -- Genetic Aspects ; Cystic Fibrosis -- Chemical Properties ; Cystic Fibrosis -- Analysis ; Genomics -- Chemical Properties ; Genomics -- Analysis;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Article
    Article
    BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health
    Language: English
    In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, 21 April 2007, Vol.92(4), p.371
    Description: Acetone-free nail polish removers are widely used and perceived as safe. However, an ingredient γ-butyrolactone (GBL) is readily converted into γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), which has well-known toxic effects. A previously well 9-month-old child was found sucking on two nail polish remover pads. The period the pads were in his mouth did not exceed 1 min. Within 15 min, he vomited and became drowsy; after 30 min he was in a coma with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 3. Oxygen was administered while he was transported to the emergency department by ambulance.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0003-9888
    ISSN: 00039888
    E-ISSN: 1468-2044
    E-ISSN: 14682044
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in Genetics, 01 November 2013, Vol.4
    Description: The rise and spread of antibiotic resistance is among the most severe challenges facing modern medicine. Despite this fact, attempts to develop novel classes of antibiotic have been largely unsuccessful. The traditional mechanisms by which antibiotics work are subject to relatively rapid bacterial resistance via mutation, and hence have a limited period of efficacy. One promising strategy to ameliorate this problem is to shift from the use of chemical compounds targeting protein structures and processes to a new era of RNA-based therapeutics. RNA-mediated regulation (riboregulation) has evolved naturally in bacteria and is therefore a highly efficient means by which gene expression can be manipulated. Here, we describe recent advances towards the development of effective anti-bacterial therapies, which operate through various strategies centred on RNA. Significant challenges facing the field, including the identification of suitable molecular targets and delivery strategies, will also be considered.
    Keywords: Bacteria ; Peptide Nucleic Acids ; Riboswitch ; Small RNA ; Antibiotic Resistance ; Antisense ; Biology
    E-ISSN: 1664-8021
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy, January 2013, Vol.57(1), pp.375-81
    Description: Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic pathogen in humans, whose infections most commonly manifest as Acanthamoeba keratitis or, more rarely, granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. Although there are many therapeutic options for the treatment of Acanthamoeba, they are generally lengthy and/or have limited efficacy. Therefore, there is a requirement for the identification, validation, and development of novel therapeutic targets against these pathogens. Recently, RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely used for these validation purposes and has proven to be a powerful tool for Acanthamoeba therapeutics. Ergosterol is one of the major sterols in the membrane of Acanthamoeba. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, one of the precursors for the production of cholesterol in humans and ergosterol in plants, fungi, and protozoa. Statins are compounds which inhibit this enzyme and so are promising as chemotherapeutics. In order to validate whether this enzyme could be an interesting therapeutic target in Acanthamoeba, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against HMG-CoA were developed and used to evaluate the effects induced by the inhibition of Acanthamoeba HMG-CoA. It was found that HMG-CoA is a potential drug target in these pathogenic free-living amoebae, and various statins were evaluated in vitro against three clinical strains of Acanthamoeba by using a colorimetric assay, showing important activities against the tested strains. We conclude that the targeting of HMG-CoA and Acanthamoeba treatment using statins is a novel powerful treatment option against Acanthamoeba species in human disease.
    Keywords: Acanthamoeba Castellanii -- Drug Effects ; Hydroxymethylglutaryl-Coa Reductase Inhibitors -- Pharmacology ; Hydroxymethylglutaryl-Coa-Reductases, Nadp-Dependent -- Metabolism ; Protozoan Proteins -- Metabolism
    E-ISSN: 1098-6596
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2010, Vol.5(2), p.e9255
    Description: The derivation of domestic cattle from the extinct wild aurochs ( Bos primigenius ) has been well-documented by archaeological and genetic studies. Genetic studies point towards the Neolithic Near East as the centre of origin for Bos taurus , with some lines of evidence suggesting possible, albeit rare, genetic contributions from locally domesticated wild aurochsen across Eurasia. Inferences from these investigations have been based largely on the analysis of partial mitochondrial DNA sequences generated from modern animals, with limited sequence data from ancient aurochsen samples. Recent developments in DNA sequencing technologies, however, are affording new opportunities for the examination of genetic material retrieved from extinct species, providing new insight into their evolutionary history. Here we present DNA sequence analysis of the first complete mitochondrial genome (16,338 base pairs) from an archaeologically-verified and exceptionally-well preserved aurochs bone sample. ; DNA extracts were generated from an aurochs humerus bone sample recovered from a cave site located in Derbyshire, England and radiocarbon-dated to 6,738±68 calibrated years before present. These extracts were prepared for both Sanger and next generation DNA sequencing technologies (Illumina Genome Analyzer). In total, 289.9 megabases (22.48%) of the post-filtered DNA sequences generated using the Illumina Genome Analyzer from this sample mapped with confidence to the bovine genome. A consensus mitochondrial genome sequence was constructed and was analysed alongside all available complete bovine mitochondrial genome sequences. ; For all nucleotide positions where both Sanger and Illumina Genome Analyzer sequencing methods gave high-confidence calls, no discrepancies were observed. Sequence analysis reveals evidence of heteroplasmy in this sample and places this mitochondrial genome sequence securely within a previously identified aurochsen haplogroup (haplogroup P), thus providing novel insights into pre-domestic patterns of variation. The high proportion of authentic, endogenous aurochs DNA preserved in this sample bodes well for future efforts to determine the complete genome sequence of a wild ancestor of domestic cattle.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Evolutionary Biology -- Animal Genetics ; Evolutionary Biology -- Bioinformatics ; Evolutionary Biology -- Evolutionary And Comparative Genetics ; Evolutionary Biology -- Genomics ; Genetics And Genomics -- Animal Genetics ; Genetics And Genomics -- Bioinformatics ; Genetics And Genomics -- Comparative Genomics ; Genetics And Genomics -- Genomics ; Genetics And Genomics -- Population Genetics
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 19 March 2002, Vol.99(6), pp.3701-5
    Description: Short introns occur in numerous protist lineages, but there are no reports of intervening sequences in the protists Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, which may represent the deepest known branches in the eukaryotic line of descent. We have discovered a 35-bp spliceosomal intron in a gene encoding a putative [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin of G. lamblia. The Giardia intron contains a canonical splice site at its 3' end (AG), a noncanonical splice site at its 5' end (CT), and a branch point sequence that fits the yeast consensus sequence of TACTAAC except for the first nucleotide (AACTAAC). We have also identified several G. lamblia genes with spliceosomal peptides, including homologues of eukaryote-specific spliceosomal peptides (Prp8 and Prp11), several DExH-box RNA-helicases that have homologues in eubacteria, but serve essential functions in the splicing of introns in eukaryotes, and 11 predicted archaebacteria-like Sm and like-Sm core peptides, which coat small nuclear RNAs. Phylogenetic analyses show the Giardia Sm core peptides are the products of multiple, ancestral gene duplications followed by divergence, but they retain strong similarity to Sm and like-Sm peptides of other eukaryotes. Although we have documented only a single intron in Giardia, it likely has other introns and fully functional, spliceosomal machinery. If introns were added during eukaryotic evolution (the introns-late hypothesis), then these results push back the date of this event before the branching of G. lamblia.
    Keywords: Evolution, Molecular ; Ferredoxins -- Genetics ; Giardia Lamblia -- Genetics ; Introns -- Genetics ; RNA Splicing -- Genetics ; Spliceosomes -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 0027-8424
    E-ISSN: 10916490
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Genome Biology (Online Edition), Sept 7, 2010, Vol.11, p.R91
    Description: Background Recent studies generating complete human sequences from Asian, African and European subgroups have revealed population-specific variation and disease susceptibility loci. Here, choosing a DNA sample from a population of interest due to its relative geographical isolation and genetic impact on further populations, we extend the above studies through the generation of 11-fold coverage of the first Irish human genome sequence. Results Using sequence data from a branch of the European ancestral tree as yet unsequenced, we identify variants that may be specific to this population. Through comparisons with HapMap and previous genetic association studies, we identified novel disease-associated variants, including a novel nonsense variant putatively associated with inflammatory bowel disease. We describe a novel method for improving SNP calling accuracy at low genome coverage using haplotype information. This analysis has implications for future re-sequencing studies and validates the imputation of Irish haplotypes using data from the current Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel (HGDP-CEPH). Finally, we identify gene duplication events as constituting significant targets of recent positive selection in the human lineage. Conclusions Our findings show that there remains utility in generating whole genome sequences to illustrate both general principles and reveal specific instances of human biology. With increasing access to low cost sequencing we would predict that even armed with the resources of a small research group a number of similar initiatives geared towards answering specific biological questions will emerge.
    Keywords: Genetic Variation -- Research ; Human Genome -- Research ; Dna Sequencing -- Usage
    ISSN: 1474-760X
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages