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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Pediatrics, September 2010, Vol.126(3), pp.425-33
    Description: The objectives of this study were to assess, in a nationally representative network of pediatricians and family physicians, (1) human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination practices, (2) perceived barriers to vaccination, and (3) factors associated with whether physicians strongly recommended HPV vaccine to 11- to 12-year-old female patients. In January through March 2008, a survey was administered to 429 pediatricians and 419 family physicians. Response rates were 81% for pediatricians and 79% for family physicians. Ninety-eight percent of pediatricians and 88% of family physicians were administering HPV vaccine in their offices (P〈.001). Among those physicians, fewer strongly recommended HPV vaccination for 11- to 12-year-old female patients than for older female patients (pediatricians: 57% for 11- to 12-year-old patients and 90% for 13- to 15-year-old patients; P〈.001; family physicians: 50% and 86%, respectively; P〈.001). The most-frequently reported barriers to HPV vaccination were financial, including vaccine costs and insurance coverage. Factors associated with not strongly recommending HPV vaccine to 11- to 12-year-old female patients included considering it necessary to discuss sexuality before recommending HPV vaccine (risk ratio: 1.27 [95% confidence interval: 1.07-1.51]) and reporting more vaccine refusals among parents of younger versus older adolescents (risk ratio: 2.09 [95% confidence interval: 1.66-2.81]). Eighteen months after licensure, the vast majority of pediatricians and family physicians reported offering HPV vaccine. Fewer physicians strongly recommended the vaccine for younger adolescents than for older adolescents, and physicians reported financial obstacles to vaccination.
    Keywords: Family Practice ; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice ; Licensure, Medical ; Papillomavirus Vaccines ; Pediatrics ; Practice Patterns, Physicians'
    ISSN: 00314005
    E-ISSN: 1098-4275
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  • 2
    In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2013, Vol.40(5), pp.431-431
    Keywords: Anti-Bacterial Agents -- Therapeutic Use ; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious -- Prevention & Control ; Prenatal Care -- Standards ; Syphilis, Congenital -- Prevention & Control;
    ISSN: 0148-5717
    E-ISSN: 15374521
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  • 3
    In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2014, Vol.41(11), pp.660-664
    Description: BACKGROUND: Estimates of the lifetime probability of acquiring human papillomavirus (HPV) can help to quantify HPV incidence, illustrate how common HPV infection is, and highlight the importance of HPV vaccination. METHODS: We developed a simple model, based primarily on the distribution of lifetime numbers of sex partners across the population and the per-partnership probability of acquiring HPV, to estimate the lifetime probability of acquiring HPV in the United States in the time frame before HPV vaccine availability. RESULTS: We estimated the average lifetime probability of acquiring HPV among those with at least 1 opposite sex partner to be 84.6% (range, 53.6%–95.0%) for women and 91.3% (range, 69.5%–97.7%) for men. Under base case assumptions, more than 80% of women and men acquire HPV by age 45 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with estimates in the existing literature suggesting a high lifetime probability of HPV acquisition and are supported by cohort studies showing high cumulative HPV incidence over a relatively short period, such as 3 to 5 years.
    Keywords: Papillomavirus Infections -- Statistics ; Papillomavirus Infections -- Demographic Aspects;
    ISSN: 0148-5717
    E-ISSN: 15374521
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Vaccine, Nov 20, 2012, Vol.30, p.F139-F148
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.05.039 Byline: Lauri E. Markowitz (a), Vivien Tsu (b), Shelley L. Deeks (c), Heather Cubie (d), Susan A. Wang (e), Andrea S. Vicari (f), Julia M.L. Brotherton (g) Keywords: HPV; vaccine introduction; vaccine acceptability Abstract: a* National HPV vaccination programs had been introduced in over 39 countries by the beginning of 2012. a* Most countries that have introduced vaccine are high income countries. a* Different health care systems/infrastructure have resulted in varied implementation. a* Substantial post-licensure safety data accumulated to date are reassuring. a* HPV introduction has generated considerable debate in some countries. Author Affiliation: (a) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, Georgia, 30333, US (b) PATH, P.O. Box 900922, Seattle, Washington, 98109, US (c) Public Health Ontario, 480 University Ave, Suite 300, Toronto, Ontario M5G1V2, Canada (d) National HPV Reference Laboratory, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Cres, Edinburgh EH16 4SA, Scotland (e) Expanded Programme on Immunization, Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland (f) Comprehensive Family Immunization Project, Pan American Health Organization, Apartado 3745, San Jose, Costa Rica (g) Victorian Cytology Service Registries, PO Box 310, East Melbourne, Victoria 8002, Australia Article History: Received 10 February 2012; Revised 7 May 2012; Accepted 8 May 2012
    Keywords: Papillomavirus Infections ; Vaccines ; Public Health ; Vaccination
    ISSN: 0264-410X
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of infectious diseases, 01 February 2014, Vol.209(3), pp.325-33
    Description: Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are common infections with serious sequelae. HSV-1 is an increasingly important cause of genital herpes in industrialized countries. Using nationally representative data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we examined HSV-1 and HSV-2 seroprevalence among 14- to 49-year-olds in the United States. We estimated seroprevalence in 1999-2004 and 2005-2010, stratified by sociodemographic characteristics and sexual behaviors. We also reviewed HSV-1 and HSV-2 seroprevalence from 1976-1980 to 2005-2010. In 2005-2010, the seroprevalence of HSV-1 was 53.9%, and the seroprevalence of HSV-2 was 15.7%. From 1999-2004 to 2005-2010, HSV-1 seroprevalence declined by nearly 7% (P 29% from 1976-1980 to 2005-2010 (P 〈 .01). An increasing number of adolescents lack HSV-1 antibodies at sexual debut. In the absence of declines in HSV-2 infections, the prevalence of genital herpes may increase.
    Keywords: Hsv-1 ; Hsv-2 ; NHANES ; Adolescents ; Genital Herpes ; Herpes Simplex Virus ; Antibodies, Viral -- Blood ; Herpes Genitalis -- Epidemiology ; Herpes Simplex -- Epidemiology ; Herpesvirus 1, Human -- Immunology ; Herpesvirus 2, Human -- Immunology
    ISSN: 00221899
    E-ISSN: 1537-6613
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, December 2013, Vol.53(6), pp.679-682
    Description: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are available in the United States and around the world to prevent HPV-associated diseases including cervical cancer and genital warts. HPV vaccination is currently recommended for adolescents: target ages for routine and catch-up vaccinations vary by country. Because the time from vaccination to cancer development can be several decades, many studies are evaluating more immediate outcomes. In the 4 years since the vaccine was introduced, reductions in HPV vaccine type prevalence and genital warts have been reported in young females in the United States and other countries. Many questions remain about the long-term impact, but the initial studies show promising results for the relatively new HPV vaccine.
    Keywords: Hpv Vaccine ; Cervical Cancer ; Prevention ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, November 2013, Vol.53(5), pp.674-676
    Description: Despite official recommendation for routine HPV vaccination of boys and girls at age 11–12 years, parents and providers are more likely to vaccinate their children/patients at older ages. Preferences for vaccinating older adolescents may be related to beliefs about an adolescent's sexual experience or perceived parental resistance to vaccinating children who are assumed to be sexually inexperienced. Using data from the 1995 wave of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ADD Health), a subset of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7 through 12 and their parents (n = 13,461), we investigated maternal underestimation of adolescent sexual experience. About one third (34.8%) of adolescents reported being sexually experienced and of these, 46.8% of their mothers inaccurately reported that their child was not sexually experienced. Underestimation varied by adolescent age with 78.1% of mothers of sexually active 11–13-year-olds reporting their child was not sexually active, compared with 56.4% of mothers of sexually active 14–16-year-olds and only 34.4% of mothers of 17–18-year-olds. Although most adolescents are not sexually active at age 11 or 12 years, waiting until a parent thinks a child is sexually active could result in missed opportunities for prevention.
    Keywords: Hpv Vaccine ; Adolescents ; Sexual Behavior ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
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  • 8
    In: JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 2017, Vol.75 Suppl 3, pp.S370-S374
    Description: BACKGROUND:: Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause oropharyngeal and anogenital cancers among men who have sex with men (MSM). In 2011, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) extended HPV vaccine recommendations to males through age 21 and MSM through age 26. Because of this distinction, vaccination for some MSM might rely on sexual behavior disclosure to health care providers. Receipt of ≥1 HPV vaccination among MSM aged 18–26 in National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) was 4.9% in 2011. We evaluated HPV vaccine coverage and associated factors among MSM in 2014. SETTING:: Twenty US metropolitan statistical areas in 2014. METHODS:: Coverage was calculated as percentage of MSM self-reporting ≥1 HPV vaccination. Adjusted prevalence ratios were calculated from Poisson regression models to estimate associations of demographic and behavioral characteristics with HPV vaccination. RESULTS:: Among 2892 MSM aged 18–26 years, HPV vaccine coverage was 17.2%. Overall, 2326 (80.4%) reported a health care visit within 12 months, and 2095 (72.4%) disclosed MSM attraction or behavior to a health care provider. Factors associated with vaccination included self-reported HIV infection; having a health care visit within 12 months, health insurance, or a usual place of care; and disclosing MSM attraction or behavior to a health care provider. CONCLUSIONS:: Since the 2011 recommendation for vaccination of males, HPV vaccine coverage among MSM increased, but remains low. Most MSM reported a recent health care visit and disclosed sexual behavior, indicating opportunities for vaccination. Potential strategies for increasing MSM coverage include improving access to recommended care, and offering education for providers and patients.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 1525-4135
    ISSN: 19447884
    E-ISSN: 19447884
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  • 9
    In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2013, Vol.40(7), pp.521-525
    Description: BACKGROUND: In 2009, an estimated 3590 new heterosexually acquired HIV infections occurred in males in the United States. Three randomized controlled trials demonstrated that male circumcision decreased a man’s risk for HIV acquisition through heterosexual sex. We describe circumcision prevalence in US males and determine circumcision prevalence among males potentially at increased risk for heterosexually acquired HIV infection. METHODS: We estimated circumcision prevalence among men and boys aged 14 to 59 years using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2005–2010. We defined men and boys with 2 or more female partners in the last year as potentially at increased risk for heterosexually acquired HIV infection. RESULTS: Estimated circumcision prevalence was 80.5%. Prevalence varied significantly by year of birth, race/ethnicity, health insurance type, and family income. Circumcision prevalence among men and boys reporting 2 or more female partners in the last year was 80.4%, which corresponded to an estimated 3.5 million uncircumcised men and boys potentially at increased risk for heterosexually acquired HIV infection. Of these men and boys, 48.3% lacked health insurance. CONCLUSIONS: Circumcision prevalence in the United States differs by demographic group, and half of uncircumcised men and boys potentially at increased risk for heterosexually acquired HIV are uninsured. These data could inform recommendations and cost analyses concerning circumcision in the United States.
    Keywords: Prevalence Studies (Epidemiology) -- Analysis ; Circumcision -- Surveys ; Circumcision -- Demographic Aspects ; Health Surveys -- Methods ; Health Surveys -- Analysis;
    ISSN: 0148-5717
    E-ISSN: 15374521
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  • 10
    In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2016, Vol.43(10), pp.633-636
    Description: ABSTRACT: Before any vaccine introduction, overall DNA prevalence of any 9-valent human papillomavirus (9vHPV) types, HPV 31/33/45/52/58, and HPV 16/18 was 16.0%, 9.5%, and 6.2%, respectively, among female participants in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Non-Hispanic black females were more likely to have infection with HPV 31/33/45/52/58, but not HPV 16/18, compared to non-Hispanic white females.
    Keywords: Papillomavirus ; Papillomavirus Infections;
    ISSN: 0148-5717
    E-ISSN: 15374521
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