Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Chemosphere, November 2013, Vol.93(9), pp.2195-2202
    Description: The main objective of this study was to determine the effects of long-term abiotic processes during aging of organic pollutants in soil on their microbial degradability and formation of non-extractable residues. The specific aims of our study were to investigate how the fate of 353-nonylphenol (NP) and phenanthrene (Phe) in soils might be affected by: (i) saturation of soil by cations with different valency (Na , Ca or Al ), (ii) addition of organic substrate (wood flour) during incubation period and (iii) different soil moisture levels. This study showed positive effect of long-term aging of sterilized samples on respiration of re-inoculated samples. However, the lack of aging effects on the mineralization of NP and Phe indicates that slow sorption processes by diffusion into less bioaccessible domains were not relevant in studied soils. Similarly, the lower respiration and xenobiotic mineralization rates in the Na and Al treated soils indicate that this is due to toxic effects on microbial activity and not due to xenobiotic accessibility. Instead, the formation of non-extractable residues was strongly promoted by biological activity, most likely through formation of more reactive metabolites. The addition of wood flour greatly stimulated microbial respiration and enhanced NP mineralization while inhibiting that of Phe. Along with negligible effect of water addition after 4 weeks of incubation on kinetics of soil respiration, the soil moisture effect on xenobiotics mineralization indicates that most probably the bioavailability of NP and Phe increased due to bridging role of water films in soil.
    Keywords: Cation Saturation ; Extractability ; Mineralization ; Sorption ; Substrate Addition ; Xenobiotics ; Chemistry ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0045-6535
    E-ISSN: 1879-1298
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, September 2018, Vol.124, pp.210-217
    Description: It is widely accepted that soil microorganisms are not evenly distributed but are often concentrated in spatially segregated hotspots that are characterized by higher substrate availability compared to the surrounding bulk soil. However, microorganisms outside of hotspots may be in a dormant or inactive state, since they have depleted all available substrates within their vicinity. So far, the knowledge about the spatial distribution and dynamics of microbial activity in subsoil is very scarce, since most available data has been acquired from either homogenized soil samples or as bulk signals from undisturbed soil cores. In this study, we introduced a new incubation approach combining soil zymography and substrate addition on undisturbed soil core surfaces. We mapped three extracellular enzymes (β-glucosidase, chitinase and acid phosphatase) on a subsoil sample from 60 cm depth and analyzed their activity-patterns using different geostatistical and spatial analyses. After initial enzyme mapping, the soil was homogenously sprayed with C glucose as model substrate and incubated for 14 days. Soil zymography was suitable for detecting hotspots in undisturbed soil, making up a proportion of 2.4% on average of the total area. Consequently, microbial-driven biogeochemical processes can be expected to be limited to small areas in this subsoil, while the major part of the soil volume is not contributing. Glucose additions considerably increased enzyme activities up to 900% in initial non-hotspots, while the effect was far lower in initial hotspots. These results show that microorganisms in the subsoil outside of hotspots can be activated and release enzymes when substrate is supplied. Thus, dormant or inactive microorganisms outside of hotspots are able to contribute to SOC mineralization when substrate limitation is overcome, thus most likely inducing positive priming effects. Our results clearly demonstrate the benefits of combining enzyme mapping with substrate additions on undisturbed soil to gain new insights about microbial hotspots and C-cycling in subsoils using spatial analyses. In contrast to traditional incubation experiments, this method gives high spatial information about microbial activity, allowing a more differentiated interpretation of incubation results.
    Keywords: Microbial Hotspots ; Soil Zymography ; Substrate Limitation ; Subsoil ; Phosphor-Imaging ; Agriculture ; Chemistry
    ISSN: 0038-0717
    E-ISSN: 1879-3428
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Environmental pollution, 2010, Vol.158, pp.148-154
    Description: In this study, effects of sewage sludge and manure borne dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) sorption and mineralization processes were investigated in three agricultural soils. Batch equilibrium techniques and equilibrium dialysis methods were used to determine sorption mechanisms between DOC, estrogens and the soil solid phase. It was found that that the presence of organic waste borne DOC decreased estrogen sorption in soils which seems to be controlled by DOC/estrogen complexes in solution and by exchange processes between organic waste derived and soil borne DOC. Incubation studies performed with 14C-estrogens showed that DOC addition decreased estrogen mineralization, probably due to reduced bioavailability of estrogens associated with DOC. This increased persistence combined with higher mobility could increase the risk of estrogen transport to ground and surface waters. The effect of DOC on estrogen sorption and mineralization is influenced by exchange processes between organic waste borne and soil derived DOC. ; Includes references ; p. 148-154.
    Keywords: Sorption ; Sewage Sludge ; Soil Properties ; Organic Wastes ; Dissolved Organic Carbon ; Soil Pollution ; Agricultural Soils ; Mineralization ; Animal Manures ; Estrogens
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, 2010, Vol.158(1), pp.148-154
    Description: In this study, effects of sewage sludge and manure borne dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) sorption and mineralization processes were investigated in three agricultural soils. Batch equilibrium techniques and equilibrium dialysis methods were used to determine sorption mechanisms between DOC, estrogens and the soil solid phase. It was found that that the presence of organic waste borne DOC decreased estrogen sorption in soils which seems to be controlled by DOC/estrogen complexes in solution and by exchange processes between organic waste derived and soil borne DOC. Incubation studies performed with C-estrogens showed that DOC addition decreased estrogen mineralization, probably due to reduced bioavailability of estrogens associated with DOC. This increased persistence combined with higher mobility could increase the risk of estrogen transport to ground and surface waters. The effect of DOC on estrogen sorption and mineralization is influenced by exchange processes between organic waste borne and soil derived DOC.
    Keywords: Doc ; Organic Waste ; Estrogen ; Sorption ; Mineralization ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, November 2017, Vol.230, pp.574-583
    Description: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.06.086 Byline: Jannis Heil [jheil@uni-wuppertal.de] (a,*), Xandra Michaelis (b), Bernd Marschner (b), Britta Stumpe (a) Keywords Urban soils; Technogenic substrates; Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy; Data mining; Random Forest Highlights * Spectroscopy and data mining were combined to a novel approach in soil pollution. * Random Forest algorithm was able to identify and quantify pollutants in urban soils. * A powerful classification system to identify environmental pollution is proposed. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of General Geography/Human-Environment Research, Institute of Geography, University of Wuppertal, 42119 Wuppertal, Germany (b) Department of Soil Science/Soil Ecology, Institute of Geography, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum, Germany * Corresponding author. Article History: Received 13 January 2017; Revised 19 May 2017; Accepted 27 June 2017 (footnote)[white star] This paper has been recommended for acceptance by B. Nowack.
    Keywords: Urban Soils ; Technogenic Substrates ; Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy ; Data Mining ; Random Forest ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics, 01 March 2015, Vol.63(1), pp.47-54
    Description: The use of treated wastewater (TWW) for agricultural irrigation becomes increasingly important in water stressed regions like the Middle East for substituting fresh water (FW) resources. Due to elevated salt concentrations and organic compounds in TWW this practice has potential adverse effects on soil quality, such as the reduction of hydraulic conductivity (HC) and soil aggregate stability (SAS). To assess the impact of TWW irrigation in comparison to FW irrigation on HC, in-situ infiltration measurements using mini disk infiltrometer were deployed in four different long-term experimental orchard test sites in Israel. Topsoil samples (0-10 cm) were collected for analyzing SAS and determination of selected soil chemical and physical characteristics.
    Keywords: Hydraulic Conductivity ; Soil Aggregate Stability ; Irrigation ; Treated Wastewater ; Israel ; Geography
    E-ISSN: 0042-790X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Biology and Fertility of Soils, 2011, Vol.47(5), pp.523-532
    Description: The objective of the present study was to determine whether substrate-induced priming effects in soils are sensitive to increasing levels of Cu and Zn. Soils were collected from ten plots of two Australian field experiments (Spalding and Avon) where increasing amounts of Cu or Zn had been added 2 years prior to sampling, reaching maximum values of 5,880 mg kg −1 for Cu and 7,400 mg kg −1 for Zn. In a 21-day incubation experiment, the effect of uniformly 14 C-labeled fructose and alanine on the mineralization of the soil organic carbon (SOC) was investigated. With increasing heavy metal content, the initial peak of soil respiration after substrate addition was retarded, indicating that the microorganisms utilizing these substrates were inhibited in soils highly contaminated with heavy metals. Both substrates strongly changed the mineralization of the soil organic matter (SOM), i.e., priming effects were induced. In the soil samples with high Cu concentrations from Spalding, fructose induced a stronger additional mineralization of the SOC than in the lower contaminated samples. In the samples with the highest Zn contamination level, negative priming effects, i.e., a reduced mineralization of SOM, were observed. In contrast, heavy metal effects in the Avon soil (pH 7.6) were less pronounced since substrate mineralization and priming effects were not directly related to the increasing heavy metal content. Apart from direct toxic heavy metal effects, the tested microbial activity parameters were also indirectly affected through the toxic heavy metal effects on plant growth. At the highest heavy metal contaminations, no fresh biomass inputs occurred during the past 2 years so that microorganisms in these soils were highly substrate-limited. As a consequence, complex interactions between different levels of heavy metal contamination, the microbial activity, and the input of SOC via plant biomass have to be considered.
    Keywords: Priming effect ; Soil organic matter ; Carbon turnover ; Soil respiration ; Heavy metals ; Biosolids
    ISSN: 0178-2762
    E-ISSN: 1432-0789
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Water, Air, & Soil Pollution, 2012, Vol.223(1), pp.199-213
    Description: Red lead (Pb 3 O 4 ) has been used extensively in the past as an anti-corrosion paint for the protection of steel constructions. Prominent examples being some of the 200,000 high-voltage pylons in Germany which have been treated with red lead anti-corrosion paints until about 1970. Through weathering and maintenance work, paint compounds and particles are deposited on the soils beneath these constructions. In the present study, six such “pylon soils” were investigated in order to characterize the plant availability and plant uptake of Pb, Cd, and Zn. For comparison, three urban soils with similar levels of heavy metal contamination were included. One phase extractions with 1 M NH 4 NO 3 , sequential extractions (seven steps), and extractions at different soil pH were used to evaluate the heavy metal binding forms in the soil and availability to plants. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to determine heavy metal uptake by Lolium multiflorum and Lactuca sativa var. crispa in untreated and limed red lead paint contaminated soils. Concentrations of Pb and Zn in the pylon soils were elevated with maximum values of 783 mg Pb kg −1 and 635 Zn mg kg −1 while the soil Cd content was similar to nearby reference soils. The pylon soils were characterized by exceptionally high proportions of NH 4 NO 3 -extractable Pb reaching up to 17% of total Pb. Even if the relatively low pH of the soils is considered (pH 4.3–4.9), this appears to be a specific feature of the red lead contamination since similarly contaminated urban soils have to be acidified to pH 2.5 to achieve a similarly high Pb extractability. The Pb content in L. multiflorum shoots reached maximum values of 73 mg kg −1 after a cultivation time of 4 weeks in pylon soil. Lime amendment reduced the plant uptake of Pb and Zn significantly by up to 91%. But L. sativa var. crispa cultivated on soils limed to neutral pH still contained critical Pb concentrations (up to 0.6 mg kg −1 fresh weight). Possible mechanisms for the exceptionally high plant availability of soil Pb derived from red lead paint are discussed.
    Keywords: var. ; Lime ; Lolium multiflorum ; PbO ; Red lead
    ISSN: 0049-6979
    E-ISSN: 1573-2932
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, February 2018, Vol.233, pp.561-568
    Description: In many water-scarce countries, waste water is used for irrigation which poses a health risk to farmers and consumers. At the same time, it delivers nutrients to the farming systems. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that biochar can be used as a filter medium for waste water treatment to reduce pathogen loads. At the same time, the biochar is becoming enriched with nutrients and therefore can act as a fertilizer for soil amendment. We used biochar as a filter medium for the filtration of raw waste water and compared the agronomic effects of this “filterchar” (FC) and the untreated biochar (BC) in a greenhouse pot trial on spring wheat biomass production on an acidic sandy soil from Niger. The biochar filter showed the same removal of pathogens as a common sand filter (1.4 log units on average). We did not observe a nutrient accumulation in FC compared to untreated BC. Instead, P, Mg and K were reduced during filtration while N content remained unchanged. Nevertheless, higher biomass ( L. Spp.) production in BC (+72%) and FC (+37%) treatments (20 t ha ), compared with the unamended control, were found. There were no significant differences in aboveground biomass production between BC and FC. Soil available P content was increased by BC (+106%) and FC (+52%) application. Besides, mineral nitrogen content was reduced in BC treated soil and to a lesser extent when FC was used. This may be explained by reduced sorption affinity for mineral nitrogen compounds on FC surfaces. Although the nutrients provided by FC decreased, due to leaching in the filter, it still yielded higher biomass than the unamended control.
    Keywords: Biochar ; Waste Water Filtration ; Plant Production ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 1991, Vol.137(2), pp.229-236
    Description: The study was carried out in a 40-yr old pine plantation on a Cambic Arenosol within the urban area of Berlin. Lime application (6.1 t ha -1 ) has led to a pH increase in the forest floor from 3.3 to 5.5 within one year and to a strong stimulation of macrofaunal and microbiological activity. Three years after liming, the C:N ratio of the forest floor decreased from 28 to 25 and P, Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd concentrations in organic matter increased significantly. The organic C pool of the forest floor was almost 7 t ha -1 lower in the limed plot which is attributed to increased microbial respiration. In the mineral soil too, C-pools are lower in the limed plot, amounting to 13.2 t ha -1 or 14% less than in the control. C:N ratios have narrowed significantly from 27–29 to 23 in 10–30 cm depth. The humic acid fraction is lower throughout the limed profile while the percentage of fulvic acids has increased significantly below 10 cm. The results point to severe losses of organic matter and to profound changes in its composition. This may be of consequences for site quality and leaching processes.
    Keywords: forest floor ; heavy metals ; humic substances ; liming ; sandy soil
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages