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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, Jan, 2015, Vol.196, p.480(3)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2014.09.003 Byline: Rainer Matyssek Author Affiliation: Technische Universitat Munchen, Ecophysiology of Plants, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany
    Keywords: Air Pollution Research -- Environmental Aspects ; Air Pollution -- Environmental Aspects ; Global Temperature Changes -- Environmental Aspects
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 2
    In: New Phytologist, July 2011, Vol.191(1), pp.160-172
    Description: • The CO2 efflux of adult trees is supplied by recent photosynthates and carbon (C) stores. The extent to which these C pools contribute to growth and maintenance respiration (RG and RM, respectively) remains obscure. • Recent photosynthates of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies) trees were labeled by exposing whole‐tree canopies to 13C‐depleted CO2. Label was applied three times during the year (in spring, early summer and late summer) and changes in the stable C isotope composition (δ13C) of trunk and coarse‐root CO2 efflux were quantified. • Seasonal patterns in C translocation rate (CTR) and fractional contribution of label to CO2 efflux (FLabel‐Max) were found. CTR was fastest during early summer. In beech, FLabel‐Max was lowest in spring and peaked in trunks during late summer (0.6 ± 0.1, mean ± SE), whereas no trend was observed in coarse roots. No seasonal dynamics in FLabel‐Max were found in spruce. • During spring, the RG of beech trunks was largely supplied by C stores. Recent photosynthates supplied growth in early summer and refilled C stores in late summer. In spruce, CO2 efflux was constantly supplied by a mixture of stored (c. 75%) and recent (c. 25%) C. The hypothesis that RG is exclusively supplied by recent photosynthates was rejected for both species.
    Keywords: Carbon Allocation ; Fagus Sylvatica European Beech ; Growth R G And Maintenance R M Respiration ; Phloem Sugars ; Picea Abies Norway Spruce ; Seasonality ; Stable Carbon Isotope Labeling ; Trunk And Coarse‐Root Co 2 Efflux
    ISSN: 0028-646X
    E-ISSN: 1469-8137
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, Nov, 2012, Vol.170, p.39(4)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2012.05.028 Byline: Johan Uddling (a), Rainer Matyssek (b), Jan B.C. Pettersson (c), Gerhard Wieser (d) Abstract: Pre-requisite for reliable O.sub.3 risk assessment for plants is determination of stomatal O.sub.3 uptake. One unaddressed uncertainty in this context relates to transpiration-induced molecular collisions impeding stomatal O.sub.3 influx. This study quantifies, through physical modelling, the error made when estimating stomatal O.sub.3 flux without accounting for molecular collisions arising from transpiratory mass flow of gas out of the leaf. The analysis demonstrates that the error increases with increasing leaf-to-air water vapour mole fraction difference ([DELTA]w), being zero in water vapour saturated air and 4.2% overestimation at [DELTA]w of 0.05. Overestimation is approximately twice as large in empirical studies quantifying stomatal O.sub.3 flux from measured leaf or canopy water flux, if neglecting both water vapour-dry air collisions (causing overestimation of leaf conductance) and collisions involving O.sub.3. Correction for transpiration-induced molecular collisions is thus relevant for both empirical research and for large-scale modelling of stomatal O.sub.3 flux across strong spatial [DELTA]w gradients. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, P. O. Box 461, SE-405 30 Goteborg, Sweden (b) Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitat Munchen, von-Carlowitz Platz 2, D-85354 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany (c) Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, Atmospheric Science, University of Gothenburg, SE-412 96 Goteborg, Sweden (d) Department of Alpine Timberline Ecophysiology, Federal Office and Research Centre for Forests, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria Article History: Received 10 November 2011; Revised 28 May 2012; Accepted 30 May 2012
    Keywords: Water -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, Dec 15, 2013, Vol.310, p.110(10)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.08.006 Byline: Michael Goisser, Ulrich Zang, Egbert Matzner, Werner Borken, Karl-Heinz Haberle, Rainer Matyssek Abstract: acents Response of juvenile European beech upon transplant to heterogeneous light and water availability. acents Plant response was examined along the gradients of light and water availability. acents High light acclimation exacerbated productivity decline under drought. acents Progressive acclimation to shade and drought mitigated productivity decline within the study period. Article History: Received 18 April 2013; Revised 4 August 2013; Accepted 5 August 2013
    Keywords: Water ; Industrial Productivity
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, 2010, Vol.158(6), pp.1985-1985
    Keywords: Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, January 2015, Vol.196, pp.480-482
    Keywords: Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Environmental pollution, 2012, Vol.170, pp.39-42
    Description: Pre-requisite for reliable O₃ risk assessment for plants is determination of stomatal O₃ uptake. One unaddressed uncertainty in this context relates to transpiration-induced molecular collisions impeding stomatal O₃ influx. This study quantifies, through physical modelling, the error made when estimating stomatal O₃ flux without accounting for molecular collisions arising from transpiratory mass flow of gas out of the leaf. The analysis demonstrates that the error increases with increasing leaf-to-air water vapour mole fraction difference (Δw), being zero in water vapour saturated air and 4.2% overestimation at Δw of 0.05. Overestimation is approximately twice as large in empirical studies quantifying stomatal O₃ flux from measured leaf or canopy water flux, if neglecting both water vapour-dry air collisions (causing overestimation of leaf conductance) and collisions involving O₃. Correction for transpiration-induced molecular collisions is thus relevant for both empirical research and for large-scale modelling of stomatal O₃ flux across strong spatial Δw gradients. ; p. 39-42.
    Keywords: Models ; Ozone ; Canopy ; Mass Flow ; Water Vapor ; Risk Assessment ; Air ; Leaves ; Uncertainty ; Leaf Conductance
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, November 2012, Vol.170, pp.39-42
    Description: Pre-requisite for reliable O risk assessment for plants is determination of stomatal O uptake. One unaddressed uncertainty in this context relates to transpiration-induced molecular collisions impeding stomatal O influx. This study quantifies, through physical modelling, the error made when estimating stomatal O flux without accounting for molecular collisions arising from transpiratory mass flow of gas out of the leaf. The analysis demonstrates that the error increases with increasing leaf-to-air water vapour mole fraction difference (Δ ), being zero in water vapour saturated air and 4.2% overestimation at Δ of 0.05. Overestimation is approximately twice as large in empirical studies quantifying stomatal O flux from measured leaf or canopy water flux, if neglecting both water vapour-dry air collisions (causing overestimation of leaf conductance) and collisions involving O . Correction for transpiration-induced molecular collisions is thus relevant for both empirical research and for large-scale modelling of stomatal O flux across strong spatial Δ gradients. Negligence of molecular collisions arising from transpiration causes overestimation of stomatal ozone flux that increase with leaf-to-air mole fraction difference of water vapour.
    Keywords: Ozone ; Carbon Dioxide ; Water Vapour ; Molecular Collisions ; Stomata ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, Nov 15, 2013, Vol.308, p.188(10)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2013.07.048 Byline: Julia A. Sohn, Timo Gebhardt, Christian Ammer, Jurgen Bauhus, Karl-Heinz Haberle, Rainer Matyssek, Thorsten E.E. Grams Abstract: acents We studied the effect of thinning on drought tolerance in Norway spruce at two sites. acents Changes in wood stable isotopes and growth during/after two droughts were analyzed. acents Effects of thinning on drought response differed with time span since thinning. acents Growth reduction during drought was lower in open stand but only if thinned recently. acents Thinning improved the growth recovery after drought at both short- and long-term. Article History: Received 4 June 2013; Revised 25 July 2013; Accepted 25 July 2013
    Keywords: Droughts -- Physiological Aspects
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 15 December 2013, Vol.310, pp.110-119
    Description: Climate models predict increasing frequency and intensity of summer drought events for Central Europe. In a field experiment, we investigated the response of young beech ( L.) to extreme and repeated summer drought and the modulation of drought response patterns along the natural gradient of light availability at the study site. In autumn 2008, two-year-old, nursery derived beech – as used for forest conversion practices – was planted under a Norway spruce stand primarily opened through winter storm. Precipitation was manipulated in the growing seasons of 2009 through 2011, inducing a pronounced gradient of water availability. Individual drought-stress doses (DSD) and light doses (LD) were calculated for each beech sapling during the three growing seasons. Plant growth, CO -assimilation rate and stomatal conductance were reduced with increasing drought stress, but facilitated by increasing light availability. Progressive acclimation to water and light limitation during the three years of the experiment led to a decreased drought and shade sensitivity of diameter growth. Water-use efficiency, root/shoot ratio and rooting depth, were increased with decreasing water availability. Mean fine root diameter and specific fine root length correlated positively with both DSD and LD. Proceeding low-light acclimation was indicated by progressively increasing specific leaf area and reduced leaf dark-respiration. Present results suggest that nursery-induced high-light acclimation of the beech saplings, exacerbated light limitation upon transplant and hence productivity decline under co-occurring water limitation.
    Keywords: European Beech ; Drought ; Light ; Restoration ; Acclimation ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
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