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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Applied Psychology, 2013, Vol.98(4), pp.678-689
    Description: Supervisors’ perceptions of how fairly they are treated by their own supervisors can influence their subordinates’ perceptions, attitudes, and behavior. We present a moderated mediation model that demonstrates how work group structure can enhance or constrain these effects. Results show supervisors’ perceptions of the fairness of the interactional treatment they receive relate to their subordinates’ perceptions of interactional justice climate, and this relationship is stronger in work groups with more organic structures. Furthermore, consistent with the moderated mediation prediction, interactional justice climate mediates the relationship between supervisors’ perceptions of interactional justice and outcomes when work group structures are more organic. We discuss the implications of the findings for research on justice and trickle-down effects.
    Keywords: Justice Climate ; Work Group Structure ; Interactional Justice ; Deviance ; Ocb
    ISSN: 0021-9010
    E-ISSN: 1939-1854
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: The Academy of Management Journal, 1 February 2012, Vol.55(1), pp.151-171
    Description: Drawing on social learning and moral identity theories, this research examines antecedents and consequences of ethical leadership. Additionally, this research empirically examines the distinctiveness of the ethical leadership construct when compared to related leadership constructs such as idealized influence, interpersonal justice, and informational justice. Consistently with the theoretically derived hypotheses, results from two studies of work units (n's = 115 and 195 units) provide general support for our theoretical model. Study 1 shows positive relationships between ethical leadership and leader "moral identity symbolization" and "moral identity internalization" (approaching significance) and a negative relationship between ethical leadership and unit unethical behavior and relationship conflict. In Study 2, both leader moral identity symbolization and internalization were positively related to ethical leadership and, with idealized influence, interpersonal justice, and informational justice controlled for, ethical leadership was negatively related to unit outcomes. In both studies, ethical leadership partially mediated the effects of leader moral identity.
    Keywords: Philosophy -- Axiology -- Ethics ; Philosophy -- Axiology -- Ethics ; Philosophy -- Applied philosophy -- Applied ethics ; Behavioral sciences -- Psychology -- Philosophical psychology ; Behavioral sciences -- Human behavior -- Organizational behavior ; Social sciences -- Communications -- Semiotics ; Philosophy -- Applied philosophy -- Applied ethics ; Business -- Business ethics -- Personality psychology ; Behavioral sciences -- Psychology -- Civil remedies ; Law -- Civil law -- Civil remedies
    ISSN: 00014273
    E-ISSN: 19480989
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Applied Psychology, 2018, Vol.103(2), pp.123-136
    Description: Workplace deviance harms the well-being of an organization and its members. Unfortunately, theory and prior research suggest that deviance is associated with job stressors, which are endemic to work organizations and often cannot be easily eliminated. To address this conundrum, we explore actions individuals can take at work that serve as buffering conditions for the positive relationship between job stressors and deviant behavior. Drawing upon conservation of resources theory, we examine a resource-building activity (i.e., learning something new at work) and a demand-shielding activity (i.e., taking time for relaxation at work) as potential boundary conditions. In 2 studies with employee samples using complementary designs, we find support for the buffering role of learning but not for relaxation. When employees learn new things at work, the relationship between hindrance stressors and deviance is weaker; as is the indirect relationship mediated by negative emotions. Taking time for relaxation at work did not show a moderating role in either study. Therefore, although relaxation is a response that individuals might be inclined to turn to for counteracting work stress, our findings suggest that, when it comes to addressing negative emotions and deviance in stressful work environments, building positive resources by learning something new at work could be more useful. In that way, doing more (i.e., learning, and not relaxing) is associated with less (deviance) in the face of job stressors.
    Keywords: Conservation Of Resources ; Job Stressors ; Learning ; Relaxation ; Workplace Deviance
    ISSN: 0021-9010
    E-ISSN: 1939-1854
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Nov, 2010, Vol.95(6), p.1121(13)
    Description: We developed a model predicting that leaders are most effective in stimulating follower cooperation when they consistently treat all group members in a fair manner and are prototypical (i.e., representative of the group's values and norms). In support of this idea, we consistently found that group members cooperated most when prototypical leaders treated themselves as well as their coworkers fairly across a laboratory experiment and 3 cross-sectional field studies. These findings highlight the important role of others' fairness experiences and perceptions in influencing one's own reactions and also the role of leaders as representing the group's values and norms. We discuss implications for fairness theory and the leader prototypicality literature. Keywords: procedural fairness, others' procedural fairness, OCB, cooperation, prototypicality DOI: 10.1037/a0020419
    Keywords: Leadership -- Research ; Leadership -- Psychological Aspects
    ISSN: 0021-9010
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Applied Psychology, 2010, Vol.95(3), pp.488-502
    Description: Building on fairness heuristic theory, fairness theory, and trust development models, we argue that unfairly enacted procedures decrease followers' trust in the authority particularly when authorities have high power over their followers. Moreover, we expected trust to mediate procedural fairness effects on followers' attitudes (authorities' legitimacy and charisma attributed to authorities) and organizational citizenship behavior. Procedural fairness effects on these variables, as mediated by trust, should therefore also be stronger when authority power is high. The results of a single- and multisource field study and a laboratory experiment supported these predictions. These studies support the role of authority power as a theoretically and practically relevant moderator of procedural fairness effects and show that its effectiveness is explained through trust in authorities.
    Keywords: Procedural Fairness ; Power ; Trust ; Charisma ; Ocb
    ISSN: 0021-9010
    E-ISSN: 1939-1854
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  • 6
    In: Personnel Psychology, March 2012, Vol.65(1), pp.1-48
    Description: We examine the influence of individuals’ propensity to morally disengage on a broad range of unethical organizational behaviors. First, we develop a parsimonious, adult‐oriented, valid, and reliable measure of an individual's propensity to morally disengage, and demonstrate the relationship between it and a number of theoretically relevant constructs in its nomological network. Then, in 4 additional studies spanning laboratory and field settings, we demonstrate the power of the propensity to moral disengage to predict multiple types of unethical organizational behavior. In these studies we demonstrate that the propensity to morally disengage predicts several outcomes (self‐reported unethical behavior, a decision to commit fraud, a self‐serving decision in the workplace, and supervisor‐ and coworker‐reported unethical work behaviors) beyond other established individual difference antecedents of unethical organizational behavior, as well as the most closely related extant measure of the construct. We conclude that scholars and practitioners seeking to understand a broad range of undesirable workplace behaviors can benefit from taking an individual's propensity to morally disengage into account. Implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed.
    Keywords: Business ; Psychology;
    ISSN: 0031-5826
    E-ISSN: 1744-6570
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, March 2012, Vol.117(2), pp.235-248
    Description: ► We integrate empowering leadership into relational fairness models. ► Encouraging self-development instilled a wish for status information in a lab study. ► It also strengthened the procedural fairness–OCB link, via status, in a field study. ► Encouraging independent action decreased the desire for status information. ► It also weakened the procedural fairness-OCB link, via status. We examined how procedural fairness interacts with empowering leadership to promote employee OCB. We focused on two core empowering leadership types— and . An experiment revealed that leaders encouraging self-development made employees desire status information more (i.e., information regarding one’s value to the organization). Conversely, leaders encouraging independent action decreased employees’ desire for this type of information. Subsequently, a multisource field study (with a US and German sample) showed that encouraging self-development strengthened the relationship between procedural fairness and employee OCB, and this relationship was mediated by employees’ self-perceived status. Conversely, encouraging independent action weakened the procedural fairness-OCB relationship, as mediated by self-perceived status. This research integrates empowering leadership styles into relational fairness theories, highlighting that multiple leader behaviors should be examined in concert and that empowering leadership can have unintended consequences.
    Keywords: Justice ; Procedural Justice ; Fairness ; Empowerment ; Empowering Leadership ; Organization Citizenship Behavior ; Autonomy ; Self-Development ; Business ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0749-5978
    E-ISSN: 1095-9920
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Human Relations, July 2013, Vol.66(7), pp.925-950
    Description: We extend the deontic model of justice (Folger, 1998, 2001) by arguing that not all employees respond to third-party injustices by experiencing an eye-for-an-eye retributive response; rather, some employees respond in ways that are higher in moral acceptance (e.g. increasing turnover intentions, engaging in constructive resistance). We predict that the positive relationship between supervisor abuse of customers and organizational deviance is weaker when employees are high in moral identity. In contrast, we hypothesize that the relationships between supervisor abuse of customers and turnover intentions and constructive resistance are more strongly positive when employees are high in moral identity. Regression results from two field studies (N = 222 and N = 199, respectively) provide general support for our theoretical model.
    Keywords: Abusive Supervision ; Customers ; Deontic Model of Justice ; Deviance ; Moral Identity ; Social Sciences (General)
    ISSN: 0018-7267
    E-ISSN: 1741-282X
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: The Leadership Quarterly, Oct, 2012, Vol.23(5), p.883(14)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2012.05.006 Byline: Niek Hoogervorst, David De Cremer, Marius van Dijke, David M. Mayer Keywords: Leadership; Self-sacrifice; Power; Inclusion; Goals Abstract: Past research on leader self-sacrifice has focused entirely on the effects of this leader behavior on followers and its implications for organizations. The present research focused on antecedents of leader self-sacrifice. We argued that self-sacrifice is positively influenced by leaders' sense of belongingness to the group they supervise. Furthermore, leaders' subjectively sensed power can serve as a moderator of this effect. We expected this because a high sense of power is known to facilitate goal pursuit. Given that organizational goals often prescribe serving the interests of the organization, leaders' sense of belongingness should promote self-sacrifice particularly among leaders low in subjective power; leaders high in subjective power should display self-sacrifice regardless of their sense of belongingness. Two field studies supported these predictions. A final experiment supported a critical assumption underlying our argument in showing that the sense of powerxsense of belongingness interaction is restricted to situations that prescribe cooperative goals. When situations prescribe competitive goals, this interaction was absent. Article History: Received 4 October 2010; Revised 5 March 2012; Accepted 26 May 2012
    ISSN: 1048-9843
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Organizational behavior and human decision processes : a journal of fundamental research and theory in applied psychology, 2012, Vol.117(1), pp. 24-40
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2011.07.003 Byline: David M. Mayer (a), Stefan Thau (b), Kristina M. Workman (a), Marius Van Dijke (c), David De Cremer (c) Keywords: Leadership; Deviance; Self; Uncertainty; Competence Abstract: a* Leader mistreatment is positively related to employee hostility and deviance. a* Employee competence uncertainty moderates these relationships. a* Employee hostility mediates this interactive effect. Author Affiliation: (a) University of Michigan, Department of Management and Organizations, Ross School of Business, 701 Tappan St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States (b) London Business School, Organizational Behavior Subject Area, Regent's Park, London NW1 4SA, United Kingdom (c) Erasmus University, Rotterdam School of Management, The Netherlands Article History: Received 2 February 2010; Accepted 24 July 2011
    Keywords: Führungsstil ; Arbeitsverhalten ; Austauschtheorie ; Feldforschung
    ISSN: 07495978
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