Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
Topic
  • 1
    In: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, November 2011, Vol.118(12), pp.1540-1541
    Description: Luxman (1998)2 conducted an underpowered RCT in an environment that had a very low rate of caesarean section in both the experimental and the control arms (6 versus 10%). Wong et al.3 received much play in the in the press—claiming that early epidurals do not increase the caesarean section rate. Their RCT of 705 nulliparous women was not on epidural analgesia per se, but on combined spinal and epidural analgesia, with a substantial delay between the spinal and the epidural, which is not how combined spinal and epidural analgesia is usually employed. At first request for pain relief, women got the spinal or a narcotic. At the second request, women received an epidural or a narcotic. By the second request, women in the experimental (spinal–epidural) and control (narcotic) arms were in advanced labour. Hence, the study was not about early epidurals at all. Ohel et al.4 studied 449 nulliparous women, and convincingly showed no difference between early and late epidurals, but the study took place in a an environment with a low rate of caesarean section (13 versus 11%). Wang et al.5 reported on a huge 5-year Chinese study, perhaps the largest study of its kind in obstetrics, of 12 993 nulliparous women, showing that even use in the latent phase, compared with later, led to no difference. It was really very early compared with later, rather than late. There was a very high rate of intervention in both arms, but the rate of caesarean section was modest (23–24%), although not at our current common rates of up to or exceeding 30%. Wong et al.6 reported on a second study by the same group, in which nulliparous women were again exposed to combined spinal and epidural analgesia, and not epidural, but it was of induced women only. Hence its external validity to women in spontaneous labour is questionable.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 1470-0328
    E-ISSN: 1471-0528
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Circulation, Oct 23, 2012, Vol.126(17), p.E273-E273
    Keywords: Beverages -- Health Aspects ; Biological Markers -- Health Aspects ; Biological Markers -- Usage ; Coronary Heart Disease -- Diagnosis ; Coronary Heart Disease -- Risk Factors
    ISSN: 0009-7322
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Child Abuse & Neglect, January 2014, Vol.38(1), pp.65-75
    Description: The study examined a diathesis stress model of the relationship between adverse child experiences (ACEs), stressors and psychosocial resources to explore their relationship with wellbeing. A cross sectional study was conducted across two mental health and addiction treatment centers. 176 individuals were interviewed using a demographics form, SCID-DSM-IV( ), Child Trauma Questionnaire ( ), NEO-Five Factor Inventory ( ), Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire ( ), The Coping, Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) ( ), Recent Life Events Questionnaire ( ) and perceived social support from family, friends and religion. Multiple, regressions and correlations were used to analyze the data. All early experiences, except physical, abuse and death of a parent in childhood, were significantly correlated with increased number of, stressors and lower wellbeing scores. This is possibly because of sample specific issues. Number of stressors partially mediated the relationship between ACEs and wellbeing. Increased number of ACEs was related to higher neuroticism and emotion-focused coping and lower conscientiousness, agreeableness, trait emotional intelligence and task coping scores. These resources were significantly related to increased stressors and lower wellbeing. Distraction and emotion coping significantly moderated the relationship between number of stressors and wellbeing. These findings support the diathesis stress model and indicate that there are significant relationships between ACEs, psychosocial, resources, stressors and wellbeing. Recommendations to improve wellbeing are discussed.
    Keywords: Adverse Child Experiences ; Abuse ; Wellbeing ; Stress ; Psychosocial Resources ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 0145-2134
    E-ISSN: 1873-7757
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Social Science & Medicine, Jan, 2014, Vol.100, p.159(8)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.11.013 Byline: Jennifer M.C. Torres Abstract: This paper uses the domain of breastfeeding in the U.S. and the work of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants to refine the concept of medicalization-demedicalization. Given lactation consultants' origins and current role in maternity care, they provide a unique lens on these processes because they are positioned at the crossroads of medicalization and demedicalization. Using 150 h of ethnographic observation and 39 interviews conducted between 2008 and 2012, I identify aspects of medicalization-demedicalization in the work of lactation consultants according to four dimensions: medical definition, medical control, pathology, and medical technology. Lactation consultants work to demedicalize breastfeeding by challenging the construction of breastfeeding pathology and limiting intervention. At the same time, they hold a position of medical control and medicalize breastfeeding by reinforcing a medical definition and using medical technology to treat breastfeeding problems. However, lactation consultants are not only working toward demedicalization and medicalization simultaneously, but are also medicalizing to demedicalize. Their position of medical control over breastfeeding provides them with a certain measure of authority that they can use in their efforts to depathologize breastfeeding and limit medical intervention. These findings build upon previous research that has identified cases of medicalization and demedicalization occurring simultaneously and draw attention to the need for an understanding of medicalization-demedicalization as a continuous process. Furthermore, the concept of "medicalizing to demedicalize" provides a novel contribution to the literature. Author Affiliation: University of Michigan, 3001 LSA Building, 500 S. State St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382, USA
    Keywords: Consulting Services ; Breast Feeding ; Medical Consultants
    ISSN: 0277-9536
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Social Science & Medicine, Jan, 2014, Vol.100, p.159(8)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.11.013 Byline: Jennifer M.C. Torres Abstract: This paper uses the domain of breastfeeding in the U.S. and the work of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants to refine the concept of medicalization-demedicalization. Given lactation consultants' origins and current role in maternity care, they provide a unique lens on these processes because they are positioned at the crossroads of medicalization and demedicalization. Using 150 h of ethnographic observation and 39 interviews conducted between 2008 and 2012, I identify aspects of medicalization-demedicalization in the work of lactation consultants according to four dimensions: medical definition, medical control, pathology, and medical technology. Lactation consultants work to demedicalize breastfeeding by challenging the construction of breastfeeding pathology and limiting intervention. At the same time, they hold a position of medical control and medicalize breastfeeding by reinforcing a medical definition and using medical technology to treat breastfeeding problems. However, lactation consultants are not only working toward demedicalization and medicalization simultaneously, but are also medicalizing to demedicalize. Their position of medical control over breastfeeding provides them with a certain measure of authority that they can use in their efforts to depathologize breastfeeding and limit medical intervention. These findings build upon previous research that has identified cases of medicalization and demedicalization occurring simultaneously and draw attention to the need for an understanding of medicalization-demedicalization as a continuous process. Furthermore, the concept of "medicalizing to demedicalize" provides a novel contribution to the literature. Author Affiliation: University of Michigan, 3001 LSA Building, 500 S. State St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382, USA
    Keywords: Consulting Services ; Breast Feeding ; Medical Consultants
    ISSN: 0277-9536
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Social Science & Medicine, Jan, 2014, Vol.100, p.159(8)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.11.013 Byline: Jennifer M.C. Torres Abstract: This paper uses the domain of breastfeeding in the U.S. and the work of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants to refine the concept of medicalization-demedicalization. Given lactation consultants' origins and current role in maternity care, they provide a unique lens on these processes because they are positioned at the crossroads of medicalization and demedicalization. Using 150 h of ethnographic observation and 39 interviews conducted between 2008 and 2012, I identify aspects of medicalization-demedicalization in the work of lactation consultants according to four dimensions: medical definition, medical control, pathology, and medical technology. Lactation consultants work to demedicalize breastfeeding by challenging the construction of breastfeeding pathology and limiting intervention. At the same time, they hold a position of medical control and medicalize breastfeeding by reinforcing a medical definition and using medical technology to treat breastfeeding problems. However, lactation consultants are not only working toward demedicalization and medicalization simultaneously, but are also medicalizing to demedicalize. Their position of medical control over breastfeeding provides them with a certain measure of authority that they can use in their efforts to depathologize breastfeeding and limit medical intervention. These findings build upon previous research that has identified cases of medicalization and demedicalization occurring simultaneously and draw attention to the need for an understanding of medicalization-demedicalization as a continuous process. Furthermore, the concept of "medicalizing to demedicalize" provides a novel contribution to the literature. Author Affiliation: University of Michigan, 3001 LSA Building, 500 S. State St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1382, USA
    Keywords: Consulting Services ; Breast Feeding ; Medical Consultants
    ISSN: 0277-9536
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Social Science & Medicine, 01/2014, Vol.100, C, pp.159-166
    Description: This paper uses the domain of breastfeeding in the U.S. and the work of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants to refine the concept of medicalization–demedicalization. Given lactation consultants' origins and current role in maternity care, they provide a unique lens on these processes because they are positioned at the crossroads of medicalization and demedicalization. Using 150 h of ethnographic observation and 39 interviews conducted between 2008 and 2012, I identify aspects of medicalization–demedicalization in the work of lactation consultants according to four dimensions: medical definition, medical control, pathology, and medical technology. Lactation consultants work to demedicalize breastfeeding by challenging the construction of breastfeeding pathology and limiting intervention. At the same time, they hold a position of medical control and medicalize breastfeeding by reinforcing a medical definition and using medical technology to treat breastfeeding problems. However, lactation consultants are not only working toward demedicalization and medicalization simultaneously, but are also medicalizing to demedicalize. Their position of medical control over breastfeeding provides them with a certain measure of authority that they can use in their efforts to depathologize breastfeeding and limit medical intervention. These findings build upon previous research that has identified cases of medicalization and demedicalization occurring simultaneously and draw attention to the need for an understanding of medicalization–demedicalization as a continuous process. Furthermore, the concept of “medicalizing to demedicalize” provides a novel contribution to the literature. •Lactation consultants are at the crossroads of medicalization and demedicalization.•They demedicalize by challenging pathologization and limiting intervention.•They medicalize by reinforcing a medical definition and managing with technology.•In some ways, they medicalize breastfeeding as a tool to demedicalize it.•This provides a new understanding of the medicalization–demedicalization process.
    Keywords: USA ; Medicalization ; Demedicalization ; Breastfeeding ; Ethnography;
    ISSN: 02779536
    E-ISSN: 18735347
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2017, Vol.114(16), pp.4249-4254
    Description: textabstractThe shape of the presynaptic action potential (AP) has a strong impact on neurotransmitter release. Because of the small size of most terminals in the central nervous system, little is known about the regulation of their AP shape during natural firing patterns in vivo. The calyx of Held is a giant axosomatic terminal in the auditory brainstem, whose biophysical properties have been well studied in slices. Here, we made whole-cell recordings from calyceal terminals in newborn rat pups. The calyx showed a characteristic burst firing pattern, which has previously been shown to originate from the cochlea. Surprisingly, even for frequencies over 200 Hz, the AP showed little or no depression. Current injections showed that the rate of rise of the AP depended strongly on its onset potential, and that the membrane potential after the AP (Vafter) was close to the value at which no depression would occur during high-frequency activity. Immunolabeling revealed that Nav1.6 is already present at the calyx shortly after its formation, which was in line with the fast recovery from AP depression that we observed in slice recordings. Our findings thus indicate that fast recovery from depression and an inter-AP membrane potential that minimizes changes on the next AP in vivo, together enable high timing precision of the calyx of Held already shortly after its formation.
    Keywords: Sciences (General);
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 10916490
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Sept, 2012, p.2488(11)
    Keywords: Delirium -- Care And Treatment ; Patient Care ; Nurses
    ISSN: 0962-1067
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Sept, 2012, p.2488(11)
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04130.x/abstract Byline: Siobhan Mc Donnell, Fiona Timmins Keywords: adults; delirium; nurses; nursing; quantitative; questionnaire; research report Aims and objectives. The aim of this study is to examine the subjective burden experienced by nurses when they provide care for patients with acute delirium. Background. Nurses' responses to dealing with the increased functional and copious demands associated with caring for a patient with delirium are not well explored. Design. The study was descriptive and retrospective, adopting quantitative research methodologies. Methods. The Strain of Care for Delirium Index (SCDI) was used to collect data in 2007 from a random sample of the national nurses' register (n = 800), in the Republic of Ireland. Results. The subjective burden that nurses experience when caring for patients with delirium was high (M = 2ae97). The hyperactive/hyperalert subscale was deemed the most challenging to deal with (M = 3ae41). In relation to individual behaviours, the patients who averaged highest in terms of burden are those who are uncooperative and difficult to manage (M = 3ae58). Conclusion. This study represents the first reported measurement and examination of the subjective burden nurses experience when caring for patients with delirium, following initial development and testing of a sensitive tool (International Journal of Nursing Studies41, 775). Findings outlined the subtypes and behaviours that increase the burden of caring for patients with delirium. This is an issue that needs to be addressed and further research is needed to explore the impact of nurse reactions further and to identify supportive/preventative methods for nurses. A specific examination into the factors that cause high levels of strain needs is required. Relevance to clinical practice. This study highlights and confirms that nursing patients with delirium is challenging for nurses. It raises awareness of the practice and policy implications of nurses' potential negative reactions to these patients. It highlights the need for additional training and education to ensure that nurses understand this condition to provide for prevention, early detection and prompt intervention. Author Affiliation: Authors: Siobhan Mc Donnell, MSc, BNS, RGN, Nurse Tutor, Milford Care Centre, Limerick; Fiona Timmins, PhD, NFESC, RGN, Associate Professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Correspondence: Fiona Timmins, Associate Professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, 24 D'Olier St., Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. Telephone: +353 1 896 3699. E-mail:fiona.timmins@tcd.ie 〈b〉Accepted for publication:〈/b〉 12 February 2012
    Keywords: Delirium -- Care And Treatment ; Patient Care ; Nurses
    ISSN: 0962-1067
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages