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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: JAMA, 21 March 2017, Vol.317(11), pp.1100-1102
    Description: Art can be a powerful tool for healing and the project would be a positive experience for all. A table of brightly colored paints and VivaldiEs calming music created a welcoming atmosphere for patients and families of all ages and artistic backgrounds. It has brought patients, families, and caregivers closer to one another, sparked the curiosity to learn about them in their daily lives, and encouraged to take better care of them.
    Keywords: Face ; Medicine in the Arts ; Interior Design and Furnishings -- Methods ; Paintings -- Psychology
    ISSN: 00987484
    E-ISSN: 1538-3598
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  • 2
    Article
    Article
    Language: English
    In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, August 2013, Vol.147(3-4), pp.299-305
    Description: Husbandry training of zoo animals (training) has been associated with many benefits, and indisputably is a valuable tool; training facilitates movement of animals within their environment, and participation in husbandry and medical procedures. Training has also been considered to be enriching. With few exceptions systematic empirical data have not been collected which have evaluated the impact of training zoo animals outside of the training session. Most publications in this area are methodological, outlining what behaviours can be trained and how, or consider the value of training whether it is believed to be beneficial or detrimental. Determining whether training is enriching, is in part hindered by semantics; what is meant by the suggestion that training is enriching? To move this situation forward five hypotheses have been suggested in this paper whereby animals would be considered to be enriched, if training: 1) affords learning opportunities, as learning is considered to be enriching; 2) can achieve the same results as conventional environmental enrichment (CEE); 3) increases human–animal interactions; 4) provides a dynamic change in the animals’ day; and 5) facilitates the provision of CEE. These suggested hypotheses are by no means exhaustive, but represent commonly held assumptions used to explain how training might be considered enriching. These hypotheses provide a starting point to systematically consider available data which support or refute whether training is enriching; an evidence based approach. Data collated revealed that training could be considered enriching according to: hypothesis 1, whilst the animal is still learning; hypothesis 2, if the ultimate consequence of training was considered itself enriching. More data are required to test hypothesis 3. And data did not support that training was enriching in and of itself according to hypotheses 4 and 5. In conclusion, training was not considered to be an appropriate alternative to the provision of CEE. Both, training and CEE are recommended to ensure an integrated holistic captive animal management strategy which will meet an animal's needs.
    Keywords: Zoo Animals ; Environmental Enrichment ; Training ; Animal Welfare ; Veterinary Medicine ; Zoology ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0168-1591
    E-ISSN: 1872-9045
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, March 2014, Vol.152, pp.103-105
    Keywords: Training ; Enrichment ; Welfare ; Veterinary Medicine ; Zoology ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0168-1591
    E-ISSN: 1872-9045
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature, Summer, 2015, Vol.67(3), p.181(18)
    Description: In Deo Gratias, he sees that he is maimed and longing to go "home"; in rycker, he sees that his religion is a sham and that his womanizing is reprehensible; in Parkinson, he sees that a certain regard for the Truth is a necessity for professional and...
    Keywords: Pain ; God ; Spirituality ; Architects ; Subconscious ; Religion ; Children ; Truth;
    ISSN: 0034-4346
    E-ISSN: 23298626
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Renascence: Essays on Values in Literature, Winter, 2012, Vol.64(2), p.177(24)
    Description: Maher refers to her as "the most religious of all McGahern's characters" (John McGahern 18) and one who plays die "role of the writer [. . .] in a sense" (16). Because of death's proximity, her mind powerfully grasps the paradox inherent in every situation, even as she grows increasingly weak and infirm;...
    Keywords: Roman Catholicism
    ISSN: 0034-4346
    E-ISSN: 23298626
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, December 2014, Vol.98(6), pp.2272-2272
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2014.06.023 Byline: Christopher Cao Author Affiliation: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Collaborative Research Group, Australia, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Rd, Camperdown, Sydney, NS, Australia 2050
    Keywords: Robots ; Robotics Industry ; Surgery;
    ISSN: 0003-4975
    E-ISSN: 1552-6259
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, July 2013, Vol.147(1-2), pp.179-185
    Description: Positive reinforcement training (hereafter known as training) has increasingly been adopted in zoos, to facilitate complex veterinary procedures without sedation or restraint and support husbandry requirements. However, empirical studies to establish the efficacy of training or investigate its impact on keeper–animal relationships are scarce; this was the topic of the current investigation. Study animals were classified as formally trained (FT) partially trained (PT) or untrained (UT). Eight black rhinoceros (2FT, 2PT & 4UT), twelve Sulawesi crested black macaques (4FT, 4PT & 4UT) and eleven Chapman zebra (4FT, 2PT & 5UT) were studied in 6 zoos across the UK and USA. Subtle cues and commands provided by keepers directed towards the animals were identified and the latency between these and the respective behavioural responses (cue-response) were recorded. Animal personalities were also assessed using trait ratings completed by keepers for each animal. Social species (zebra and macaques) responded quicker to cues than the solitary species (rhino; = 13.716, 〈 0.001). FT animals responded quicker to keeper cues than PT and UT animals ( = 6.131, 〈 0.01). There was no significant difference in the cue-response latencies according to personality traits ( = −1.576, 〉 0.05). Data suggested that trained group living animals had reduced latencies when reacting to keeper's cues, regardless of their personality. If we consider short cue-response latencies to be indicative of low fear, then we suggest that training can potentially reduce animals’ fear of humans thus could contribute to positive keeper–animal relationships which in turn could lead to improved animal welfare.
    Keywords: Stockmanship ; Training ; Response Rate ; Personality ; Animal Welfare ; Veterinary Medicine ; Zoology ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0168-1591
    E-ISSN: 1872-9045
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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  • 8
    In: PLoS ONE, 2015, Vol.10(10)
    Description: Stockmanship is a term used to describe the management of animals with a good stockperson someone who does this in a in a safe, effective, and low-stress manner for both the stock-keeper and animals involved. Although impacts of unfamiliar zoo visitors on animal behaviour have been extensively studied, the impact of stockmanship i.e familiar zoo keepers is a new area of research; which could reveal significant ramifications for zoo animal behaviour and welfare. It is likely that different relationships are formed dependant on the unique keeper-animal dyad (human-animal interaction, HAI). The aims of this study were to (1) investigate if unique keeper-animal dyads were formed in zoos, (2) determine whether keepers differed in their interactions towards animals regarding their attitude, animal knowledge and experience and (3) explore what factors affect keeper-animal dyads and ultimately influence animal behaviour and welfare. Eight black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) , eleven Chapman’s zebra (Equus burchellii) , and twelve Sulawesi crested black macaques (Macaca nigra) were studied in 6 zoos across the UK and USA. Subtle cues and commands directed by keepers towards animals were identified. The animals latency to respond and the respective behavioural response (cue-response) was recorded per keeper-animal dyad (n = 93). A questionnaire was constructed following a five-point Likert Scale design to record keeper demographic information and assess the job satisfaction of keepers, their attitude towards the animals and their perceived relationship with them. There was a significant difference in the animals’ latency to appropriately respond after cues and commands from different keepers, indicating unique keeper-animal dyads were formed. Stockmanship style was also different between keepers; two main components contributed equally towards this: “attitude towards the animals” and “knowledge and experience of the animals”. In this novel study, data demonstrated unique dyads were formed between keepers and zoo animals, which influenced animal behaviour.
    Keywords: Research Article
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Number Theory, Feb, 2015, Vol.147, p.508(7)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnt.2014.07.024 Byline: Giuseppe Melfi Abstract: A weird number is a number n for which [sigma](n)2n and such that n is not a sum of distinct proper divisors of n. In this paper we prove that n=2.sup.kpq is weird for a quite large set of primes p and q. In particular this gives an algorithm to generate very large primitive weird numbers, i.e., weird numbers that are not multiple of other weird numbers. Assuming classical conjectures on the gaps between consecutive primes, this also would prove that there are infinitely many primitive weird numbers, a question raised by Benkoski and ErdAs in 1974. Author Affiliation: University of Neuchatel, Faculty of Economics and Business, Rue A.-L. Breguet, 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel, Switzerland Article History: Received 30 January 2014; Revised 8 July 2014; Accepted 28 August 2014 Article Note: (miscellaneous) Communicated by F. Pellarin
    Keywords: Algorithms -- Statistics
    ISSN: 0022-314X
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 04 October 2016, Vol.113(40), pp.E5952-E5961
    Description: Faithful cell cycle progression in the dimorphic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus requires spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and cell pole differentiation. We discovered an essential DNA-associated protein, GapR, that is required for Caulobacter growth and asymmetric division. GapR interacts with adenine and thymine (AT)-rich chromosomal loci, associates with the promoter regions of cell cycle-regulated genes, and shares hundreds of recognition sites in common with known master regulators of cell cycle-dependent gene expression. GapR target loci are especially enriched in binding sites for the transcription factors GcrA and CtrA and overlap with nearly all of the binding sites for MucR1, a regulator that controls the establishment of swarmer cell fate. Despite constitutive synthesis, GapR accumulates preferentially in the swarmer compartment of the predivisional cell. Homologs of GapR, which are ubiquitous among the α-proteobacteria and are encoded on multiple bacteriophage genomes, also accumulate in the predivisional cell swarmer compartment when expressed in Caulobacter The Escherichia coli nucleoid-associated protein H-NS, like GapR, selectively associates with AT-rich DNA, yet it does not localize preferentially to the swarmer compartment when expressed exogenously in Caulobacter, suggesting that recognition of AT-rich DNA is not sufficient for the asymmetric accumulation of GapR. Further, GapR does not silence the expression of H-NS target genes when expressed in E. coli, suggesting that GapR and H-NS have distinct functions. We propose that Caulobacter has co-opted a nucleoid-associated protein with high AT recognition to serve as a mediator of cell cycle progression.
    Keywords: At-Rich ; Caulobacter ; Asymmetry ; Cell Cycle ; Nucleoid-Associated Protein ; Cell Cycle ; At Rich Sequence -- Genetics ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; Caulobacter Crescentus -- Cytology ; DNA-Binding Proteins -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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