Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: JAPANESE JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, 2013, Vol.68(1), pp.182-182
    Keywords: Biology;
    ISSN: 0021-4930
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Cell, 11 April 2013, Vol.153(2), pp.426-437
    Description: Glucose homeostasis is strictly controlled in all domains of life. Bacteria that are unable to balance intracellular sugar levels and deal with potentially toxic phosphosugars cease growth and risk being outcompeted. Here, we identify the conserved haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzyme YigL as the previously hypothesized phosphatase for detoxification of phosphosugars and reveal that its synthesis is activated by an Hfq-dependent small RNA in . We show that the glucose-6-P-responsive small RNA SgrS activates YigL synthesis in a translation-independent fashion by the selective stabilization of a decay intermediate of the dicistronic messenger RNA (mRNA). Intriguingly, the major endoribonuclease RNase E, previously known to function together with small RNAs to degrade mRNA targets, is also essential for this process of mRNA activation. The exploitation of and targeted interference with regular RNA turnover described here may constitute a general route for small RNAs to rapidly activate both coding and noncoding genes. ► The bacterial small RNA SgrS posttranscriptionally activates the synthesis of YigL ► YigL is the previously hypothesized phosphatase that prevents phosphosugar toxicity ► SgrS activates yigL by a translation-independent mRNA-stabilization mechanism ► SgrS stabilizes an intermediate in the yigL mRNA decay pathway YigL, a long-sought bacterial phosphatase, regulates glucose-6-phosphate levels. A small regulatory RNA upregulates YigL synthesis by base pairing with the coding sequence of the preceding gene to interfere with endonucleolytic yigL mRNA decay.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 0092-8674
    E-ISSN: 1097-4172
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, April 2015, Vol.24, pp.132-139
    Description: Most studies of small regulatory RNAs in bacteria have focussed on conserved transcripts in intergenic regions. However, several recent developments including single-nucleotide resolution transcriptome profiling by RNA-seq and increased knowledge of the cellular targets of the RNA chaperone Hfq suggest that the bacterial world of functional small RNAs is more diverse. One emerging class are small RNAs that are identical to the 3′ regions of known mRNAs, but are produced either by transcription from internal promoters or by mRNA processing. Using several recently discovered examples of such sRNAs, we discuss their biogenesis and modes of action, and illustrate how they can facilitate mRNA crosstalk in various physiological processes.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1369-5274
    E-ISSN: 1879-0364
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    In: EMBO Journal, 03 June 2015, Vol.34(11), pp.1478-1492
    Description: There is an expanding list of examples by which one can posttranscriptionally influence the expression of others. This can involve sponges that sequester regulatory s of s in the same regulon, but the underlying molecular mechanism of such cross talk remains little understood. Here, we report sponge‐mediated cross talk in the posttranscriptional network of GcvB, a conserved Hfq‐dependent small with one of the largest regulons known in bacteria. We show that decay from the locus encoding an amino acid transporter generates a stable fragment (SroC) that base‐pairs with GcvB. This interaction triggers the degradation of GcvB by ase E, alleviating the GcvB‐mediated repression of other amino acid‐related transport and metabolic genes. Intriguingly, since the itself is a target of GcvB, the SroC sponge seems to enable both an internal feed‐forward loop to activate its parental in and activation of many ‐encoded s in the same pathway. Disabling this cross talk affects bacterial growth when peptides are the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. Decay of the bacterial GcvB , which keeps it from regulating its targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target . This ability of s to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria. . Decay of the bacterial GcvB s, which keeps it from regulating its m targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target m. This ability of ms to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria.
    Keywords: G Cv B ; H Fq ; Noncoding Rna ; Rn Ase E ; S Ro C
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: EMBO journal: European Molecular Biology Organization, 2015, Issue 11, pp.1478-1492
    Description: There is an expanding list of examples by which one mRNA can posttranscriptionally influence the expression of others. This can involve RNA sponges that sequester regulatory RNAs of mRNAs in the same regulon, but the underlying molecular mechanism of such mRNA cross talk remains little understood. Here, we report sponge-mediated mRNA cross talk in the posttranscriptional network of GcvB, a conserved Hfq-dependent small RNA with one of the largest regulons known in bacteria. We show that mRNA decay from the gltIJKL locus encoding an amino acid ABC transporter generates a stable fragment (SroC) that base-pairs with GcvB. This interaction triggers the degradation of GcvB by RNase E, alleviating the GcvB-mediated mRNA repression of other amino acid-related transport and metabolic genes. Intriguingly, since the gltIJKL mRNA itself is a target of GcvB, the SroC sponge seems to enable both an internal feed-forward loop to activate its parental mRNA in cis and activation of many trans-encoded mRNAs in the same pathway. Disabling this mRNA cross talk affects bacterial growth when peptides are the sole carbon and nitrogen sources.
    Keywords: Gcvb ; Hfq ; Noncoding Rna ; Rnase E ; Sroc
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    Source: Fundación Dialnet
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: Japanese
    In: 化学と生物, 2013, Vol.51(11), pp.725-727
    Keywords: Chemistry;
    ISSN: 0453-073X
    E-ISSN: 18836852
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    In: The Journal of Bacteriology, 2010, Vol. 192(17), p.4337
    Description: To understand the mechanisms for structural diversification of Pseudomonas-derived toluene-catabolic (TOL) plasmids, the complete sequence of a self-transmissible plasmid pDK1 with a size of 128,921 bp from Pseudomonas putida HS1 was determined. Comparative analysis revealed that (i) pDK1 consisted of a 75.6-kb IncP-7 plasmid backbone and 53.2-kb accessory gene segments that were bounded by transposon-associated regions, (ii) the genes for conjugative transfer of pDK1 were highly similar to those of MOB... group of mobilizable plasmids, and (iii) the toluene-catabolic (xyl) gene clusters of pDK1 were derived through homologous recombination, transposition, and site-specific recombination from the xyl gene clusters homologous to another TOL plasmid, pWW53. The minireplicons of pDK1 and its related IncP-7 plasmids, pWW53 and pCAR1, that contain replication and partition genes were maintained in all of six Pseudomonas strains tested, but not in alpha- or betaproteobacterial strains. The recipient host range of conjugative transfer of pDK1 was, however, limited to two Pseudomonas strains. These results indicate that IncP-7 plasmids are essentially narrow-host-range and self-transmissible plasmids that encode MOB... group-related transfer functions and that the host range of IncP-7-specified conjugative transfer was, unlike the situation in other well-known plasmids, narrower than that of its replication. (ProQuest: ... denotes formulae/symbols omitted.)
    Keywords: Bacteriology ; Plasmids ; Gene Expression ; Comparative Analysis ; Gram-Negative Bacteria;
    ISSN: 0021-9193
    ISSN: 00219193
    E-ISSN: 10985530
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    In: The Journal of Bacteriology, 2007, Vol. 189(19), p.6849
    Description: The IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1 of Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 confers the ability to degrade carbazole upon transfer to the recipient strain P. putida KT2440. We designed a customized whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray to study the coordinated expression of pCAR1 and the chromosome in the transconjugant strain KT2440(pCAR1). First, the transcriptome of KT2440(pCAR1) during growth with carbazole as the sole carbon source was compared to that during growth with succinate. The carbazole catabolic car and ant operons were induced, along with the chromosomal cat and pca genes involved in the catechol branch of the β-ketoadipate pathway. Additionally, the regulatory gene antR encoding the AraC/XylS family transcriptional activator specific for car and ant operons was upregulated. The characterization of the antR promoter revealed that antR is transcribed from an RpoN-dependent promoter, suggesting that the successful expression of the carbazole catabolic operons depends on whether the chromosome contains the specific RpoN-dependent activator. Next, to analyze whether the horizontal transfer of a plasmid alters the transcription network of its host chromosome, we compared the chromosomal transcriptomes of KT2440(pCAR1) and KT2440 under the same growth conditions. Only subtle changes were caused by the transfer of pCAR1, except for the significant induction of the hypothetical gene PP3700, designated parI, which encodes a putative ParA-like ATPase with an N-terminal Xre-type DNA-binding motif. Further transcriptional analyses showed that the parI promoter was positively regulated by ParI itself and the pCAR1-encoded protein ParA. [PUBLICATION ]
    Keywords: Bacteria ; Bacteriology ; Genomics ; Proteomics ; Gene Expression ; Chromosomes;
    ISSN: 0021-9193
    ISSN: 00219193
    E-ISSN: 10985530
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Bacteriology, Sept, 2010, Vol.192(17-18), p.4720(12)
    Description: Histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family proteins are nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) conserved among many bacterial species. The IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1 is transmissible among various Pseudomonas strains and carries a gene encoding the H-NS family protein, Pmr. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a host of pCAR1, which harbors five genes encoding the H-NS family proteins PP_1366 (TurA), PP_3765 (TurB), PP_0017 (TurC), PP_3693 (TurD), and PP_2947 (TurE). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the presence of pCAR1 does not affect the transcription of these five genes and that only pmr, turA, and turB were primarily transcribed in KT2440(pCAR1). In vitro pull-down assays revealed that Pmr strongly interacted with itself and with TurA, TurB, and TurE. Transcriptome comparisons of the pmr disruptant, KT2440, and KT2440(pCAR1) strains indicated that pmr disruption had greater effects on the host transcriptome than did pCAR1 carriage. The transcriptional levels of some genes that increased with pCAR1 carriage, such as the mexEF-oprN efflux pump genes and parI, reverted with pmr disruption to levels in pCAR1-free KT2440. Transcriptional levels of putative horizontally acquired host genes were not altered by pCAR1 carriage but were altered by pmr disruption. Identification of genome-wide Pmr binding sites by ChAP-chip (chromatin affinity purification coupled with high-density tiling chip) analysis demonstrated that Pmr preferentially binds to horizontally acquired DNA regions. The Pmr binding sites overlapped well with the location of the genes differentially transcribed following pmr disruption on both the plasmid and the chromosome. Our findings indicate that Pmr is a key factor in optimizing gene transcription on pCAR1 and the host chromosome. doi: 10.1128/JB.00591-10
    Keywords: Bacterial Proteins -- Genetic Aspects ; Plasmids -- Research ; Host-bacteria Relationships -- Genetic Aspects
    ISSN: 0021-9193
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Microbiology (Reading, England), May 2014, Vol.160(Pt 5), pp.883-91
    Description: To identify bacterial genetic determinants for fitness in a soil environment, signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was applied to a soil bacterium, Burkholderia multivorans ATCC 17616. This strain was randomly mutagenized by each of 36 different signature-tagged plasposons, and 36 mutants with different tags were grouped as a set. A total of 192 sets consisting of 6912 independent mutants were each inoculated into soil and incubated. Two-step STM screening based on quantitative real-time PCR of total DNAs extracted from the resulting soil samples using the tag-specific primers led to the selection of 39 mutant candidates that exhibited a reduction in relative competitive fitness during incubation in the soil, and 32 plasposon-insertion sites were determined. Among them, mutants having plasposon insertion in fur, deaD or hrpA exhibited reduced fitness during incubation in soil when compared with the control strain. The deficiency in the soil fitness of the fur mutant was recovered by the introduction of the wild-type fur gene, indicating that the fur gene is one of the genetic determinants for fitness in the soil.
    Keywords: Mutagenesis, Insertional ; Soil Microbiology ; Burkholderia -- Physiology
    ISSN: 13500872
    E-ISSN: 1465-2080
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages