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  • 1
    In: Age and Ageing, 2013, Vol. 42(6), pp.816-816
    Keywords: Asian Continental Ancestry Group -- Statistics & Numerical Data ; Hip Fractures -- Ethnology;
    ISSN: 0002-0729
    E-ISSN: 1468-2834
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  • 2
    In: Animal Genetics, February 2012, Vol.43(1), pp.1-1
    Description: To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2052.2011.02297.x Byline: Chris Moran
    Keywords: Animal Genetics;
    ISSN: 0268-9146
    E-ISSN: 1365-2052
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  • 3
    In: Age and Ageing, 2012, Vol. 41(3), pp.322-326
    Description: Background: hip fracture represents a huge medical, social and financial burden on patients, their carers and the health and social care systems. For survivors, return to their own home may be a key outcome. The Nottingham Hip Fracture Score (NHFS) is a validated score, based on admission characteristics, for predicting 30-day and 1-year mortality that may be of benefit in predicting return-to-home, directly from the acute orthopaedic ward. to assess the utility of the NHFS as a predictor of return-to-home in patients following hip fracture. the NHFS was calculated for all patients admitted from their own home and the correlation between the NHFS and eventual return-to-home was calculated, as well as the probability of discharge by within 7, 14 and 21 days. a total of 6,123 patients were available for analysis. Of which, 3,699 (60%) were discharged from acute hospital to their own home. Increasing NHFS was negatively correlated with eventual return-to-home ( = 0.949) and with the proportion of patients discharged back to their own home at 7, 14 and 21 postoperative days, respectively ( = 0.84, 0.94, 0.96, respectively). the NHFS is a reliable tool for predicting return-to-home. It may be useful for discharge planning, and for the design of future research trials.
    Keywords: Hip Fracture ; Prediction ; Scoring ; Discharge Destination ; Elderly
    ISSN: 0002-0729
    E-ISSN: 1468-2834
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Injury, 2011, Vol.42(11), pp.1253-1256
    Description: This study aims to assess the mortality associated with hip fracture at 5 years in a geriatric population, and evaluate the influence of age, cognitive state, mobility and residential status on long term survival after hip fracture. A prospective audit was carried out of all patients with a hip fracture admitted to a university hospital over a 4 year period. Data from 2640 patients were analysed and multivariate analysis used to indicate the important variables predicting mortality. Patients fulfilling the criteria of age 〈 80 years, Abbreviated Mental Test Score (AMT) ≥ 7/10, independently mobile and admitted from own home were put into group A (low risk group). Patients not meeting the criteria were placed into group B (high risk group). 2640 patients fitted the inclusion criteria, 482 in group A and 2158 in group B. 850 patients (43.1%) died in their first year following hip fracture. 302 patients (63%) of group A were still alive at 5 years in comparison with only 367 (17%) of group B. Overall, 669 (25%) patients survived for 5 years. Increased survival was shown for the following variables: age 〈 80 years RR 5.27 ( 〈 0.01), AMT ≥ 7/10 RR 6.03 ( 〈 0.01), independent mobility RR 2.63 ( 〈 0.01) and admitted from own home RR 4.52 ( 〈 0.01). These findings will allow for early recognition of those patients with an increased chance of long-term survival following hip fracture. Such patients may be suitable for surgical treatment, such as total hip replacement, which has a good long-term outcome.
    Keywords: Hip Fracture ; Long-Term Survival ; Mortality ; Total Hip Replacement
    ISSN: 0020-1383
    E-ISSN: 1879-0267
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Cleaner Production, 15 July 2013, Vol.51, pp.299-300
    Description: The supply of minerals and energy is critical to the maintenance and growth of human and environmental wellbeing. However, the necessarily disruptive processes can create collateral negative impacts that result in trade-offs with the benefits of supply. Individual companies that undertake these activities have taken steps to minimise any negative impacts and legacies. Similarly, companies have joined in various associations to coordinate the development of policies and the principles that underpin them. The International Council on Mining and Metals is the most globally-prominent industry association. This special volume will explore the changes in light of Rio20+ against the backdrop of the potential for change as articulated by ICMM and other organisations. Publications and guidelines on many topics have been published, e.g., human rights, mine closure, social development, operating in a carbon constrained world, resource endowment etc. The special volume will analyse the achievements that the mining sector has made, take a critical look at areas where progress has been less than what might have been hoped, identify barriers to progress and highlight opportunities for future progress. Papers are invited on all aspects of operating sustainably and how this relates to sustainable development at regional and national levels.
    Keywords: Engineering
    ISSN: 0959-6526
    E-ISSN: 1879-1786
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  • 6
    Article
    Article
    In: AusIMM Bulletin, No. 1, Feb 2014: 88
    ISSN: 1034-6775
    Source: Australian Public Affairs - Full Text (RMIT)
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  • 7
    In: Neurology, 2015, Vol.85(13), pp.1123-1130
    Description: OBJECTIVE:: Our objective was to investigate whether type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) influences neurodegeneration in a manner similar to Alzheimer disease (AD), by promoting brain β-amyloid (Aβ) or tau. METHODS:: We studied the cross-sectional associations of T2DM with cortical thickness, brain Aβ load, and CSF levels of Aβ and tau in a sample of people from the Alzheimerʼs Disease Neuroimaging Initiative with diagnoses of AD dementia, mild cognitive impairment, and normal cognition. All (n = 816) received MRI, and a subsample underwent brain amyloid imaging (n = 102) and CSF Aβ and tau measurements (n = 415). Analyses were performed across and within cognitive diagnostic strata. RESULTS:: There were 124 people with T2DM (mean age 75.5 years) and 692 without T2DM (mean age 74.1 years). After adjusting for age, sex, total intracranial volume, APO ε4 status, and cognitive diagnosis, T2DM was associated with lower bilateral frontal and parietal cortical thickness (mL) (β = −0.03, p = 0.01). T2DM was not associated with C Pittsburgh compound B standardized uptake value ratio (AU) in any brain region or with CSF Aβ42 levels (pg/mL). T2DM was associated with greater CSF total tau (pg/mL) (β = 16.06, p = 0.04) and phosphorylated tau (β = 5.84, p = 0.02). The association between T2DM and cortical thickness was attenuated by 15% by the inclusion of phosphorylated tau. CONCLUSIONS:: T2DM may promote neurodegeneration independent of AD dementia diagnosis, and its effect may be driven by tau phosphorylation. The mechanisms through which T2DM may promote tau phosphorylation deserve further study.
    Keywords: Medicine;
    ISSN: 0028-3878
    E-ISSN: 1526632X
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Injury, December 2013, Vol.44(12), pp.1838-1842
    Description: There is a paucity of research into the outcomes and complications of cervical spine immobilisation (hard collar or halothoracic brace) in older people. To identify morbidity and mortality outcomes using geriatric medicine assessment techniques following cervical immobilisation in older people with isolated cervical spine fractures. We identified participants using an injury database. We completed a questionnaire measuring pre-admission medical co-morbidities and functional independence. We recorded the surgical plan and all complications. A further questionnaire was completed three months later recording complications and functional independence. Sixteen patients were recruited over a three month period. Eight were immobilised with halothoracic brace, 8 with external hard collar. Three deaths occurred during the study. Lower respiratory tract infection was the most common complication (7/16) followed by delirium (6/16). Most patients were unable to return home following the acute admission, requiring sub-acute care on discharge. The majority of patients were from home prior to a fall, 6/16 were residing there at 3 months. Most participants had an increase in their care needs at 3 months. There was no difference in the type or incidence of complications between the different modes of immobilisation. Geriatric medicine assessment techniques identified the morbidity and functional impairment associated with cervical spine immobilisation. This often results in a prolonged length of stay in supported care. This small pilot study recommends a larger study over a longer period using geriatric medicine assessment techniques to better define the issues.
    Keywords: Cervical Spine Fracture ; Older Adults
    ISSN: 0020-1383
    E-ISSN: 1879-0267
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Cleaner Production, Dec 1, 2014, Vol.84, p.411(10)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.04.079 Byline: Mansour Edraki, Thomas Baumgartl, Emmanuel Manlapig, Dee Bradshaw, Daniel M. Franks, Chris J. Moran Abstract: With the unprecedented rate of mining and mineral processing over the past decade, there has been an increasing level of concern worldwide about the fate of tailings and the irreversible consequences of contaminant release through dust, tailings dam seepage, dam wall failure, or direct disposal of tailings into waterways. It is likely that in the future the mining of higher tonnages of lower grade ore and the possibility of more extreme weather events associated with global climatic change, may increase the risks associated with mine tailings management. In this paper we review alternative tailings management methods that aim to improve environmental, social and economic outcomes. Three approaches in particular are highlighted: paste and thickened tailings; tailings reuse, recycling and reprocessing; and proactive management (e.g. the integration of sulphide flotation with cemented paste backfill). The aim of the present study is to scope the opportunities that could be gained by developing an integrated research framework that traces tailings properties back to the orebody. In the future models could be constructed to optimise environmental, social and economic outcomes of tailings management across the value chain through integrated orebody characterisation, mine planning, processing, disposal, re-processing, recycling and reuse. Author Affiliation: (a) Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Sustainable Minerals Institute, University of Queensland, Level 5, Sir James Foots Building (47A), St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia (b) Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre, Sustainable Minerals Institute, University of Queensland, Indooroopilly, QLD 4068, Australia (c) Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining, Sustainable Minerals Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia (d) Sustainable Minerals Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia Article History: Received 20 October 2013; Revised 22 April 2014; Accepted 29 April 2014
    Keywords: Weather -- Environmental Aspects ; Weather -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0959-6526
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Cleaner Production, Dec 1, 2014, Vol.84, p.494(8)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.03.084 Byline: Laura J. Sonter, Chris J. Moran, Damian J. Barrett, Britaldo S. Soares-Filho Abstract: Mining regions undergo abrupt and extensive land use change, the impacts of which pose management challenges for mining companies and regulatory agencies. In this study we investigated 20 years of land use change in Brazil's Iron Quadrangle (QF) mining region. We classified remote sensing images to produce land use maps and conducted a Land Change analysis to investigate the causes and consequences of observed changes. The QF underwent extensive land use change between 1990 and 2010, including deforestation, plantation expansion, urbanization and mine expansion. Comparing our results with those of surrounding non-mining landscapes illustrated important differences. For example, QF contained additional highly profitable land uses, including mining and plantation forestry, which were driven by globalized markets for mineral resources. This finding suggests processes of land use change within mining regions are distinct from those found elsewhere and, as such, land management policies should reflect this. We also hypothesized four generalizations regarding these processes: 1) the direct footprints of mining expands over time, 2) the offsite footprints of mining are extensive and also often expanding, 3) the direct and indirect land used by mines causes environmental and social impacts, some of which are not captured by current management approaches, and 4) the footprints of mining (and associated impacts) are driven by global factors, many of which are uncontrollable by local land holders and regional land management plans and policies. We describe and discuss these generalizations, drawing on published evidence from other mining regions to illustrate both their generality and implications for land management. Author Affiliation: (a) The University of Queensland, Sustainable Minerals Institute, Centre for Water in the Minerals Industry, Brisbane, Australia (b) CSIRO Land and Water, Canberra, Australia (c) Centro de Sensoriamento Remoto, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil Article History: Received 30 October 2013; Revised 24 March 2014; Accepted 24 March 2014
    Keywords: Land Management ; Plantations ; Land Use ; Mineral Deposits ; Deforestation ; Urbanization ; Land Use Controls
    ISSN: 0959-6526
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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