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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Oncology Research and Treatment, February 2013, Vol.36(1), pp.19-26
    Description: Abstract Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel
    Keywords: Paper ; Medicine
    ISBN: 9783318023732
    ISBN: 3318023736
    ISSN: 2296-5270
    ISSN: 0378584X
    E-ISSN: 2296-5262
    E-ISSN: 14230240
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Annals of Hematology, 2011, Vol.90(4), pp.473-475
    ISSN: 0939-5555
    E-ISSN: 1432-0584
    Source: Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Annals of hematology, December 2015, Vol.94(12), pp.2063-5
    Description: Byline: Karin G. Schrenk (1), Kathrin Katenkamp (2), Jorg Felber (3), Lars-Olof Mugge (1), Andreas Hochhaus (1), Sebastian Scholl (1,4) Author Affiliation: (1) Klinik fur Innere Medizin II (Abteilung Hamatologie und Internistische Onkologie), Universitatsklinikum Jena, Jena, Germany (2) Institut fur Pathologie, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Jena, Germany (3) Klinik fur Innere Medizin IV (Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie und Infektiologie), Universitatsklinikum Jena, Jena, Germany (4) Department of Internal Medicine II, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740, Jena, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 31/07/2015 Received Date: 11/05/2015 Accepted Date: 29/07/2015 Online Date: 21/08/2015
    Keywords: Antineoplastic Agents -- Adverse Effects ; Bortezomib -- Adverse Effects ; Crohn Disease -- Therapy ; Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage -- Etiology ; Leukemia, Plasma Cell -- Therapy ; Stem Cell Transplantation -- Adverse Effects
    ISSN: 09395555
    E-ISSN: 1432-0584
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Annals of Hematology, 21 July 2010, Vol.90(4), pp.473-475
    Description: Dear Editor, We report on two patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially presenting in 2007. Both patients were tested positive for the FLT3-ITD mutation and were therefore treated with the FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib (400 mg/day) after progress of AML following several protocols of conventional chemotherapy. Both patients responded with a significant reduction of peripheral blast counts after 10 to 17 days leading to hematological response for 12 and 14 weeks, respectively. At the time of relapse, molecular analysis investigating mutations of both tyrosine kinase domains by sequencing of each individual FLT3-ITD cDNA did not demonstrate any additional mutations. We therefore suggest that the secondary resistance to sorafenib is mediated by other mechanisms than the acquisition of secondary mutations of FLT3 in these patients. FLT3-ITD mutations represent the second most frequent molecular aberration in AML leading to a constitutive activity of the class III receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3. FLT3-ITD mutations can be found in 25–30% of all AML patients and are associated with a reduced disease-free survival and overall survival [1–3].
    Keywords: Medicine ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0939-5555
    E-ISSN: 1432-0584
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Annals of Hematology, 2013, Vol.92(7), pp.985-987
    Description: Byline: Karin G. Schrenk (1), Manuela Krokowski (2), Alfred C. Feller (2), Veronica Bernhard (2), Lars-Olof Mugge (1), Peter Oelzner (3), Gunter Wolf (3), Andreas Hochhaus (1), Thomas Neumann (3) Author Affiliation: (1) Abteilung fur Hamatologie und internistische Onkologie, Klinik fur Innere Medizin II, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747, Jena, Germany (2) Institut fur Pathologie, Referenzzentrum fur Lymphknotenpathologie und Hamatopathologie, Universitat Lubeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Lubeck, Germany (3) Abteilung fur Nephrologie, Rheumatologie/Osteologie, Endokrinologie/Stoffwechselerkrankungen Klinik fur Innere Medizin III, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747, Jena, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 03/12/2012 Received Date: 13/07/2012 Accepted Date: 01/12/2012 Online Date: 16/01/2013
    Keywords: Leukemia;
    ISSN: 0939-5555
    E-ISSN: 1432-0584
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Kidney and Blood Pressure Research, March 2012, Vol.35(2), pp.120-128
    Description: Background: Renal involvement in the light chain-associated diseases multiple myeloma (MM), amyloidosis (AL) and monoclonal immune position disease (MIDD) is common and differential diagnosis usually requires renal biopsy. The aim of this study was to investigate if noninvasive methods are viable to identify and differentiate between the various types of kidney diseases. Patients and Methods: All patients with a light chain-associated disease admitted to our center from 1996 to 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. Renal biopsy data were correlated with proteinuria findings. Results: Only the ratio of free ĸ/λ light chains showed a good sensitivity for myeloma cast nephropathy (MCN), AL and MIDD. The λ light chain was characteristic for AL, the ĸ light chain dominated in MIDD. Renal function at the time of diagnosis was worst in MIDD. MCN presented with a proteinuria of 〉3.5 g/g creatinine. In contrast, a higher proteinuria was found in AL or MIDD. Whereas the ĸ/λ ratio in the urine was pathological for all three diseases, extremely high or low ratios indicated the presence of MCN. However, in AL or MIDD, the ratio was only moderately elevated. Conclusion: A noninvasive differentiation between MCN and other forms of renal light chain disease is possible.
    Keywords: Original Paper ; Light Chain Diseases ; Urine Protein Profile ; Myeloma Cast Nephropathy ; Amyloidosis ; Monoclonal Immune Deposition Disease ; Medicine ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 1420-4096
    E-ISSN: 1423-0143
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 2016, Vol.142(12), pp.2603-2610
    Description: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00432-016-2270-9 Byline: Nils Winkelmann (1), Max Desole (1,2), Inken Hilgendorf (1), Thomas Ernst (1), Herbert G. Sayer (1,3), Christa Kunert (1), Lars-Olof Mugge (1), Andreas Hochhaus (1), Sebastian Scholl (1) Keywords: Myeloma; Cyclophosphamide; Stem cell mobilization Abstract: Introduction Even in the era of proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, the autologous stem cell transplantation after high-dose melphalan continues to represent a standard approach for myeloma patients in first-line therapy. Different mobilization chemotherapies before stem cell apheresis have been published while cyclophosphamide at a dose level of up to 4 g/m.sup.2 has been evaluated and is commonly applied. In contrast, lower dose levels of cyclophosphamide (e.g., 1.5 g/m.sup.2) did not result in a sufficient collection of stem cells. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the impact of "intermediate-dose" (ID-CY, 2.5 g/m.sup.2) versus "high-dose" (HD-CY, 4 g/m.sup.2) cyclophosphamide in 101 (48 vs. 53) consecutively evaluable myeloma patients (median age 59 years, range 32--72 years) who underwent stem cell mobilization after induction chemotherapy. Successful stem cell harvest was defined as a stem cell yield of at least 5 million CD34 cells per kg bodyweight. Evaluation of toxicity especially considered infectious complications and hematological toxicity in both subgroups. Results Successful stem cell mobilization was achieved in 40 of 48 (83 %) and 44 of 53 (83 %) patients, respectively. The median time to apheresis (11 vs. 12 days) and the median CD34 content of stem cell harvest (8.3 vs. 7.6 million CD34 cells per kg bodyweight) did not differ significantly between both groups. There was a significant difference of WBC nadir in favor of the cyclophosphamide regimen with 2.5 g/m.sup.2 (0.8 vs. 0.3 Gpt/L, p = 0.021), and neutropenic fever was more often observed in patients who received 4 g/m.sup.2 cyclophosphamide (34 vs. 15 %, p = 0.078). Importantly, after induction chemotherapy using the VCD regimen (bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone), successful stem cell mobilization was achieved in 26 of 29 (90 %) patients treated with 2.5 g/m.sup.2 and 21 of 25 (84 %) patients receiving 4 g/m.sup.2 cyclophosphamide, respectively. Conclusions ID-CY is safe and highly effective for stem cell mobilization in patients with newly diagnosed myeloma and associated with a reduced toxicity compared to HD-CY. Author Affiliation: (1) Klinik fur Innere Medizin II (Abteilung Hamatologie und Internistische Onkologie), Universitatsklinikum Jena, Am Klinikum 1, 07740, Jena, Germany (2) HELIOS Klinikum Emil von Behring, Berlin, Germany (3) HELIOS Klinikum, Erfurt, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 10/09/2016 Received Date: 09/08/2016 Accepted Date: 10/09/2016 Online Date: 17/09/2016
    Keywords: Myeloma ; Cyclophosphamide ; Stem cell mobilization
    ISSN: 0171-5216
    E-ISSN: 1432-1335
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Annals of Hematology, 2015, Vol.94(12), pp.2063-2065
    ISSN: 0939-5555
    E-ISSN: 1432-0584
    Source: Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, 2010, Vol.99(1), pp.129-134
    Description: Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is rare. Clinical and histological differential diagnosis of systemic lymphoma and sarcoidosis continues to be a challenge. The first case report in the German and English literature of PCNSL and synchronous sarcoidosis is presented. Synchronous mediastinal lymphadenopathy suggestive of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) or sarcoidosis was noted. Both conditions require alternative therapeutic and prognostic considerations to PCNSL. A regime of intrathecal and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy led to transient clinical improvement prior to the patient’s demise through overwhelming sepsis and multiorgan failure. Post mortem findings confirmed synchronous PCNSL with mediastinal lymph node sarcoidosis.
    Keywords: Primary central nervous system lymphoma ; Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma ; Neurosarcoidosis
    ISSN: 0167-594X
    E-ISSN: 1573-7373
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 2015, Vol.141(9), pp.1639-1644
    Description: Byline: Georg Maschmeyer (1), Lars-Olof Mugge (2), Dietrich Kampfe (3), Ute Kreibich (4), Stephan Wilhelm (5), Michael A[sz]mann (6), Maik Schwarz (7), Christoph Kahl (8,9), Susanne Kohler (10), Norbert Grobe (11), Dietger Niederwieser (12) Keywords: NEC; NET; Neuroendocrine carcinoma; Chemotherapy; Somatostatin Abstract: Rationale There is a paucity of data on the incidence of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) outside pulmonary primaries and on treatment modalities applied to patients with NET in clinical practice. Only very little therapeutic progress has been made with respect to response and overall survival, particularly among patients with poorly differentiated, WHO grade 3 neuroendocrine carcinomas (G3-NEC). We sought to document the incidence and treatment modalities in patients with NET/NEC within a period of 2 years. Methods We conducted a retrospective data analysis using a simple documentation file to be completed in written form or electronically, including localization, WHO grading, treatment modalities, and specific therapeutic regimens applied. Primary lung cancer was excluded. The time period to be covered was 2010 through 2012. Individual patient data such as names or age were not documented, so that no ethics committee approval was required. Results Ten different hospital- or practice-based institutions contributed their data. One to 35 patients were documented per institution, summing up to 149 patients with 154 tumor localizations. Midgut (n = 46), foregut (n = 42), hindgut (n = 17), lung (n = 9), bladder (n = 8), unknown primary (n = 11), and other including prostate and liver (n = 21) were documented as tumor sites. Histological gradings were G1 (n = 71), G2 (n = 27), G3 (n = 34), undifferentiated "G4" (n = 4), and not specified (n = 13). Treatment modalities were surgical resection (n = 102), chemotherapy (n = 49), somatostatin analogs (n = 39), radiotherapy (n = 22), receptor-directed radionuclide therapy (n = 12), and systemic tyrosine kinase inhibition (n = 5). Chemotherapy was given to patients not only with G3-NEC (n = 31), but also with G2 (n = 12) and G1 NET (n = 7). Somatostatin analogs as well as receptor-directed radionuclides were applied to patients throughout all gradings. Conclusions NET and NEC are not very rare tumor entities, but are diagnosed with very different frequencies, possibly depending upon the alertness of pathologists and clinicians. Chemotherapy, receptor-directed radionuclide application, and somatostatin analog therapy are applied without a clear correlation to different histologic gradings. Diagnostic and therapeutic progress in the field of NETs/carcinomas is urgently needed. Author Affiliation: (1) Klinik fur Hamatologie, Onkologie und Palliativmedizin, Klinikum Ernst von Bergmann gGmbH, Charlottenstrasse 72, 14467, Potsdam, Germany (2) Klinik fur Innere Medizin II, Hamatologie/Internistische Onkologie, Universitatsklinikum Jena, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740, Jena, Germany (3) Praxis fur Hamatologie und Onkologie, Rathausplatz 3-7, 58507, Ludenscheid, Germany (4) Klinik fur Innere Medizin III, Hamatologie, Onkologie und Palliativmedizin, Heinrich-Braun-Klinikum Zwickau gGmbH, Karl-Keil-Str. 35, 08060, Zwickau, Germany (5) Internistische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Am Wall 1, 18273, Gustrow, Germany (6) Schwerpunktpraxis Hamatologie/Onkologie, MVZ Elblandpolikliniken GmbH, A.-Puschkinplatz 4c, 01587, Riesa, Germany (7) Schwerpunktpraxis fur Hamatologie und Onkologie, Paracelsus Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum Schoneck I, Albertplatz 1, 08261, Schoneck, Germany (8) Klinik fur Hamatologie und Onkologie, Klinikum Magdeburg gGmbH, Birkenallee 34, 39130, Magdeburg, Germany (9) Klinik fur Hamatologie, Onkologie und Palliativmedizin, Universitatsmedizin Rostock, Ernst-Heydemann-Str. 6, 18057, Rostock, Germany (10) Klinik fur Innere Medizin III, HELIOS Kreiskrankenhaus Gotha/Ohrdruf, Heliosstra[sz]e 1, 99867, Gotha, Germany (11) Klinik fur Innere Medizin I, Abteilung Hamatologie und Internistische Onkologie, Dietrich- Bonhoeffer- Klinikum Neubrandenburg, Dr.-Salvador- Allende- Str. 30, 17036, Neubrandenburg, Germany (12) Abteilung Hamatologie, Internistische Onkologie und Hamostaseologie, Universitatsklinikum Leipzig, Johannisallee 32A, 04103, Leipzig, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 10/03/2015 Received Date: 26/01/2015 Accepted Date: 09/03/2015 Online Date: 15/03/2015
    Keywords: NEC ; NET ; Neuroendocrine carcinoma ; Chemotherapy ; Somatostatin
    ISSN: 0171-5216
    E-ISSN: 1432-1335
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