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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of bacteriology, January 2015, Vol.197(2), pp.277-85
    Description: The Gram-negative commensal bacterium nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) can cause respiratory tract diseases that include otitis media, sinusitis, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchitis. During colonization and infection, NTHI withstands oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by the host, and by other copathogens and flora. These reactive oxygen species include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals, whose killing is amplified by iron via the Fenton reaction. We previously identified genes that encode proteins with putative roles in protection of the NTHI isolate strain 86-028NP against oxidative stress. These include catalase (HktE), peroxiredoxin/glutaredoxin (PgdX), and a ferritin-like protein (Dps). Strains were generated with mutations in hktE, pgdX, and dps. The hktE mutant and a pgdX hktE double mutant were more sensitive than the parent to killing by H2O2. Conversely, the pgdX mutant was more resistant to H2O2 due to increased catalase activity. Supporting the role of killing via the Fenton reaction, binding of iron by Dps significantly mitigated the effect of H2O2-mediated killing. NTHI thus utilizes several effectors to resist oxidative stress, and regulation of free iron is critical to this protection. These mechanisms will be important for successful colonization and infection by this opportunistic human pathogen.
    Keywords: Haemophilus Influenzae -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00219193
    E-ISSN: 1098-5530
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Bacteriology, 2013, Vol.195(15-16), p.3486(17)
    Description: Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease that facilitates the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. In humans, H. ducreyi is surrounded by phagocytes and must adapt to a hostile environment to survive. To sense and respond to environmental cues, bacteria frequently use two-component signal transduction (2CST) systems. The only obvious 2CST system in H. ducreyi is CpxRA; CpxR is a response regulator, and CpxA is a sensor kinase. Previous studies by Hansen and coworkers showed that CpxR directly represses the expression of dsrA, the lspB-lspA2 operon, and the flp operon, which are required for virulence in humans. They further showed that CpxA functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vitro to maintain the expression of virulence determinants. Since a cpxA mutant is avirulent while a cpxR mutant is fully virulent in humans, CpxA also likely functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vivo. To better understand the role of H. ducreyi CpxRA in controlling virulence determinants, here we defined genes potentially regulated by CpxRA by using RNA-Seq. Activation of CpxR by deletion of cpxA repressed nearly 70% of its targets, including seven established virulence determinants. Inactivation of CpxR by deletion of cpxR differentially regulated few genes and increased the expression of one virulence determinant. We identified a CpxR binding motif that was enriched in downregulated but not upregulated targets. These data reinforce the hypothesis that CpxA phosphatase activity plays a critical role in controlling H. ducreyi virulence in vivo. Characterization of the downregulated genes may offer new insights into pathogenesis.
    Keywords: Chancroid – Causes of ; Gene Expression – Research ; Hemophilus Infections – Research ; Virulence (Microbiology) – Research
    ISSN: 0021-9193
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Bacteriology, April, 2012, Vol.194(7-8), p.1927(7)
    Description: We previously demonstrated that one or more products of the genes in the pil and com gene clusters of the opportunistic human respiratory pathogen nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) are required for type IV pilus (Tfp) biogenesis and function. Here, we have now demonstrated that the pilABCD and comABCDEF gene clusters are operons and that the product of each gene is essential for normal pilus function. Mutants with nonpolar deletions in each of the 10 pil and com genes had an adherence defect when primary human airway cells were used as the target. These mutants were also diminished in their ability to form a biofilm in vitro and, additionally, were deficient in natural transformation. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the product of each gene within these operons is required for the normal biogenesis and/or function of NTHI Tfp. Based on the similarity of PilA to other type IV pilins, we further predicted that the product of the pilA gene would be the major pilin subunit. Toward that end, we also demonstrated by immunogold labeling and mass spectrometry that PilA is indeed the majority type IV pilin protein expressed by NTHI. These new observations set the stage for experiments designed to dissect the function of each of the proteins encoded by genes within the pil and com gene clusters. The ability to characterize individual proteins with vital roles in NTHI colonization or pathogenesis has the potential to reduce the burden of NTHI-induced diseases through development of a Tfp-derived vaccine or a pilus-directed therapeutic.
    Keywords: Bacterial Genetics -- Research ; Gene Expression -- Research ; Haemophilus Influenzae -- Genetic Aspects ; Operons -- Research
    ISSN: 0021-9193
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(10), p.e25923
    Description: Strains of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae show enormous genetic heterogeneity and display differential virulence potential in different clinical settings. The igaB gene, which encodes a newly identified IgA protease, is more likely to be present in the genome of COPD strains of H. influenzae than in otitis media strains. Analysis of igaB and surrounding sequences in the present study showed that H. influenzae likely acquired igaB from Neisseria meningitidis and that the acquisition was accompanied by a ∼20 kb genomic inversion that is present only in strains that have igaB . As part of a long running prospective study of COPD, molecular typing of H. influenzae strains identified a clonally related group of strains, a surprising observation given the genetic heterogeneity that characterizes strains of nontypeable H. influenzae . Analysis of strains by 5 independent methods (polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, igaB gene sequences, P2 gene sequences, pulsed field gel electrophoresis) established the clonal relationship among the strains. Analysis of 134 independent strains collected prospectively from a cohort of adults with COPD demonstrated that ∼10% belonged to the clonal group. We conclude that a clonally related group of strains of nontypeable H. influenzae that has two IgA1 protease genes ( iga and igaB ) is adapted for colonization and infection in COPD. This observation has important implications in understanding population dynamics of H. influenzae in human infection and in understanding virulence mechanisms specifically in the setting of COPD.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Genetics And Genomics ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Respiratory Medicine
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: J. Mol. Biol, 26 July 2019, Vol.293((52) ; 12, 2018)
    Description: The primary role of bacterial periplasmic binding proteins is sequestration of essential metabolites present at a low concentration in the periplasm and making them available for active transporters that transfer these ligands into the bacterial cell. The periplasmic binding proteins (SiaPs) from the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transport system that transports mammalian host-derived sialic acids have been well studied from different pathogenic bacteria, including , , , and SiaPs bind the sialic acid -acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) with nanomolar affinity by forming electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Here, we report the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein (SatA) of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system from the pathogenic bacterium The structure of -SatA in the native form and sialic acid-bound forms (with Neu5Ac and -glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc)), determined to 2.2, 1.5, and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively, revealed a ligand-binding site that is very different from those of the SiaPs of the TRAP transport system. A structural comparison along with thermodynamic studies suggested that similar affinities are achieved in the two classes of proteins through distinct mechanisms, one enthalpically driven and the other entropically driven. In summary, our structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hd-SatA reveals that it binds sialic acids with nanomolar affinity and that this binding is an entropically driven process. This information is important for future structure-based drug design against this pathogen and related bacteria.
    Keywords: ABC Transporter ; Haemophilus Ducreyi ; Crystal Structure ; Energetics ; Enthalpy ; Entropy ; Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (Itc) ; Nutrient Sequestration ; Periplasmic Binding Protein ; Sialic Acid ; Sugar Transport ; Virulence;
    ISSN: 00219258
    E-ISSN: 1083351X
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2013, Vol.8(3), p.e59388
    Description: Type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are a class of macromolecular secretion machines that are utilized by a number of bacteria for inter-bacterial competition or to elicit responses in eukaryotic cells. Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe infections in humans. These infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, are important, as they are often associated with hospitals and medical-settings where they disproportionally affect critically ill patients like those residing in intensive care units. While it is known that A. baumannii genomes carry genes whose predicted products have homology with T6SS-associated gene products from other bacteria, and secretion of a major T6SS structural protein Hcp has been demonstrated, no additional work on an A. baumannii T6SS has been reported. Herein, we demonstrated that A. baumannii strain M2 secretes Hcp and this secretion was dependent upon TssB, an ortholog of a bacteriophage contractile sheath protein, confirming that strain M2 produces a functional T6SS. Additionally, we demonstrated that the ability of strain M2 to out-compete Escherichia coli was reliant upon the products of tssB and hcp. Collectively, our data have provided the first evidence demonstrating function in inter-bacterial competition, for a T6SS produced by A. baumannii.
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Bacteriology, 2012, Vol. 194(8), p.1927
    Description: We previously demonstrated that one or more products of the genes in the pil and com gene clusters of the opportunistic human respiratory pathogen nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) are required for type IV pilus (Tfp) biogenesis and function. Here, we have now demonstrated that the pilABCD and comABCDEF gene clusters are operons and that the product of each gene is essential for normal pilus function. Mutants with nonpolar deletions in each of the 10 pil and com genes had an adherence defect when primary human airway cells were used as the target. These mutants were also diminished in their ability to form a biofilm in vitro and, additionally, were deficient in natural transformation. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the product of each gene within these operons is required for the normal biogenesis and/or function of NTHI Tfp. Based on the similarity of PilA to other type IV pilins, we further predicted that the product of the pilA gene would be the major pilin subunit. Toward that end, we also demonstrated by immunogold labeling and mass spectrometry that PilA is indeed the majority type IV pilin protein expressed by NTHI. These new observations set the stage for experiments designed to dissect the function of each of the proteins encoded by genes within the pil and com gene clusters. The ability to characterize individual proteins with vital roles in NTHI colonization or pathogenesis has the potential to reduce the burden of NTHI-induced diseases through development of a Tfp-derived vaccine or a pilus-directed therapeutic. ; p. 1927-1933.
    Keywords: Vaccines ; Haemophilus Influenzae ; Biogenesis ; Pathogenesis ; Humans ; Pathogens ; Multigene Family ; Mutants ; Fimbriae ; Biofilm ; Mass Spectrometry ; Operon ; Bacteriology ; Proteins;
    ISSN: 1098-5530
    ISSN: 10985530
    ISSN: 00219193
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of bacteriology, December 2014, Vol.196(23), pp.4012-25
    Description: Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid and a chronic limb ulceration syndrome in children. In humans, H. ducreyi is found in an abscess and overcomes a hostile environment to establish infection. To sense and respond to membrane stress, bacteria utilize two-component systems (TCSs) and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. We previously showed that activation of CpxRA, the only intact TCS in H. ducreyi, does not regulate homologues of envelope protein folding factors but does downregulate genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, including many virulence determinants. H. ducreyi also harbors a homologue of RpoE, which is the only ECF sigma factor in the organism. To potentially understand how H. ducreyi responds to membrane stress, here we defined RpoE-dependent genes using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 180 RpoE-dependent genes, of which 98% were upregulated; a major set of these genes encodes homologues of envelope maintenance and repair factors. We also identified and validated a putative RpoE promoter consensus sequence, which was enriched in the majority of RpoE-dependent targets. Comparison of RpoE-dependent genes to those controlled by CpxR showed that each transcription factor regulated a distinct set of genes. Given that RpoE activated a large number of genes encoding envelope maintenance and repair factors and that CpxRA represses genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, these data suggest that RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulating envelope homeostasis in H. ducreyi.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Stress, Physiological ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; Cell Membrane -- Physiology ; Haemophilus Ducreyi -- Physiology ; Protein Kinases -- Metabolism ; Sigma Factor -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00219193
    E-ISSN: 1098-5530
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of bacteriology, August 2013, Vol.195(15), pp.3486-502
    Description: Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease that facilitates the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. In humans, H. ducreyi is surrounded by phagocytes and must adapt to a hostile environment to survive. To sense and respond to environmental cues, bacteria frequently use two-component signal transduction (2CST) systems. The only obvious 2CST system in H. ducreyi is CpxRA; CpxR is a response regulator, and CpxA is a sensor kinase. Previous studies by Hansen and coworkers showed that CpxR directly represses the expression of dsrA, the lspB-lspA2 operon, and the flp operon, which are required for virulence in humans. They further showed that CpxA functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vitro to maintain the expression of virulence determinants. Since a cpxA mutant is avirulent while a cpxR mutant is fully virulent in humans, CpxA also likely functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vivo. To better understand the role of H. ducreyi CpxRA in controlling virulence determinants, here we defined genes potentially regulated by CpxRA by using RNA-Seq. Activation of CpxR by deletion of cpxA repressed nearly 70% of its targets, including seven established virulence determinants. Inactivation of CpxR by deletion of cpxR differentially regulated few genes and increased the expression of one virulence determinant. We identified a CpxR binding motif that was enriched in downregulated but not upregulated targets. These data reinforce the hypothesis that CpxA phosphatase activity plays a critical role in controlling H. ducreyi virulence in vivo. Characterization of the downregulated genes may offer new insights into pathogenesis.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; Haemophilus Ducreyi -- Genetics ; Phosphoprotein Phosphatases -- Metabolism ; Protein Kinases -- Metabolism ; Repressor Proteins -- Metabolism ; Virulence Factors -- Biosynthesis
    ISSN: 00219193
    E-ISSN: 1098-5530
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Sept 1, 2013, Vol.208(5), p.720(8)
    Keywords: Haemophilus Influenzae -- Genetic Aspects ; Haemophilus Influenzae -- Research ; Genetic Variation -- Research
    ISSN: 0022-1899
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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