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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Polish Psychological Bulletin, 01 September 2016, Vol.47(3), pp.311-317
    Description: The aim of the studies was to ascertain how far psychology students are ready to learn the vocation of education assistants to children and youth. Four general ways of acquiring knowledge and skills - by assimilation, by doing, by discovering, and by impression - were distinguished and interpreted...
    Keywords: Educational Diagnostics ; Educational Diagnostician ; Learning Model ; Ego State ; Educational Diagnostician Inventory ; Psychology
    E-ISSN: 1641-7844
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 01 November 2015, Vol.93(3), pp.S169-S169
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.07.407 Byline: P.C. Li, N.J. Liebsch, A. Niemierko, S. Lessell, H.A. Shih Author Affiliation: (1) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (2) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (3) Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA Article Note: (footnote) Author Disclosure: P.C. Li: None. N.J. Liebsch: None. A. Niemierko: None. S. Lessell: None. H.A. Shih: Employee; Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center. Honoraria; International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0360-3016
    E-ISSN: 1879-355X
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 01 October 2016, Vol.96(2), pp.E405-E405
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2016.06.1647 Byline: L. Luo, A. Niemierko, P.J. Gray Author Affiliation: (1) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (2) Department of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Article Note: (footnote) Author Disclosure: L. Luo: None. A. Niemierko: None. P.J. Gray: None.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0360-3016
    E-ISSN: 1879-355X
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of Pediatrics, November 2013, Vol.163(5), pp.1448-1453
    Description: To review symptoms and provider history in a large cohort of patients with germ cell tumors (GCTs) to highlight the variety of manifestations and assess the effect of delayed diagnosis on outcomes. Patients treated for intracranial pure germinoma and nongerminomatous GCTs at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1998 and 2012 were included (n = 70). The primary outcome was time from onset of symptoms to diagnostic imaging. Delay was defined as an interval of ≥6 months. The median duration of symptoms before diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging was 6 months (range, 2 days to 72 months). Thirty-eight of the 70 patients (54%) had a delayed diagnosis. Patients with suprasellar tumors presented with symptoms related to endocrinopathies, and patients with pineal region tumors presented with symptoms related to hydrocephalus. Most of the patients were evaluated by a general pediatrician (49%) and/or pediatric subspecialists (66%) before diagnosis. Patients with delayed diagnosis saw a greater number of physicians before diagnosis ( = .006). The majority of patients (63%) with delayed diagnosis were seen by 2 or more physicians, and many (40%) were seen by 2 or more subspecialists. Progression-free survival was similar in the patients with delayed diagnosis and those without delayed diagnosis ( = .90), but the former were more likely to present with disseminated disease at diagnosis (34% vs 6%; = .007). A significant proportion of patients with GCT experience a delay in time to diagnosis, in some cases despite evaluation by general pediatricians and specialists. This delay increases the risk of disseminated disease.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0022-3476
    E-ISSN: 1097-6833
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 01 September 2013, Vol.87(1), pp.216-222
    Description: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in identifying the clinically optimal solution.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0360-3016
    E-ISSN: 1879-355X
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 01 November 2015, Vol.93(3), pp.E461-E461
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.07.1725 Byline: K.M. Winkfield, S. Gallotto, A. Niemierko, J.A. Adams, N.J. Tarbell, Y.L. Chen Author Affiliation: (1) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (2) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Article Note: (footnote) Author Disclosure: K.M. Winkfield: None. S. Gallotto: None. A. Niemierko: None. J.A. Adams: None. N.J. Tarbell: None. Y. Chen: None.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0360-3016
    E-ISSN: 1879-355X
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 2011, Vol.81(1), pp.232-238
    Description: This study retrospectively examines the long-term therapeutic outcomes of 32 patients with primary spinal cord gliomas at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1991 and 2005 treated by either photon intensity-modulated radiotherapy or conformal proton radiotherapy. Individual patient tumor types included 14 ependymomas, 17 astrocytomas, and one oligodendroglioma. Twenty-two patients were treated with photon beam radiation therapy, and 10 patients were treated with proton beam therapy. The overall survival and time to progression were analyzed. Average radiation dose for patients was 51 Gy in 1.8 median daily fractions over 29 treatments. For all 32 patients, the overall 5-year survival was 65% and the progression-free survival was 61%, respectively. Overall survival was significantly worse for patients more than 55 years of age ( = 0.02). Ependymoma patients had significantly longer survival times than astrocytoma patients ( = 0.05). Patients who had undergone a biopsy developed worse outcomes then those with a resection ( = 0.05). With the caveat of a limited number of patients, the multivariate model seems to suggest improved overall survival for younger patients (〈54 years of age), ependymoma histology, and photon vs. proton treatment. For patients with spinal cord gliomas, significant factors associated with patient outcome include tumor pathology, age, extent of surgery, and treatment.
    Keywords: Spinal Cord Glioma ; Intramedullary Tumor ; Proton Beam Therapy ; Radiation Therapy ; Medicine
    ISSN: 0360-3016
    E-ISSN: 1879-355X
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 01 November 2015, Vol.93(3), pp.E125-E125
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.07.867 Byline: S. Tanguturi, A. Niemierko, J.Y. Wo, K.N. Nguyen, H. Prichard, J.A. Wolfgang, T.S. Hong Author Affiliation: (1) Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (2) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (3) Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Article Note: (footnote) Author Disclosure: S. Tanguturi: None. A. Niemierko: None. J.Y. Wo: None. K.N. Nguyen: None. H. Prichard: None. J.A. Wolfgang: None. T.S. Hong: None.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0360-3016
    E-ISSN: 1879-355X
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  • 9
    In: Medical Physics, June 2016, Vol.43(6Part38), pp.3789-3790
    Description: Chris Marshall: Memorial Introduction Donald Edmonds Herbert Jr., or Don to his colleagues and friends, exemplified the “big tent” vision of medical physics, specializing in Applied Statistics and Dynamical Systems theory. He saw, more clearly than most, that “Making models is the difference between doing science and just fooling around [ref Woodworth, 2004]”. Don developed an interest in chemistry at school by “reading a book” ‐ a recurring theme in his story. He was awarded a Westinghouse Science scholarship and attended the Carnegie Institute of Technology (later Carnegie Mellon University) where his interest turned to physics and led to a BS in Physics after transfer to Northwestern University. After (voluntary) service in the Navy he earned his MS in Physics from the University of Oklahoma, which led him to Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore to pursue a PhD. The early death of his wife led him to take a salaried position in the Physics Department of Colorado College in Colorado Springs so as to better care for their young daughter. There, a chance invitation from Dr. Juan del Regato to teach physics to residents at the Penrose Cancer Hospital introduced him to Medical Physics, and he decided to enter the field. He received his PhD from the University of London (UK) under Prof. Joseph Rotblat, where I first met him, and where he taught himself statistics. He returned to Penrose as a clinical medical physicist, also largely self‐taught. In 1975 he formalized an evolving interest in statistical analysis as Professor of Radiology and Head of the Division of Physics and Statistics at the College of Medicine of the University of South Alabama in Mobile, AL where he remained for the rest of his career. He also served as the first Director of their Bio‐Statistics and Epidemiology Core Unit working in part on a sickle‐cell disease. After retirement he remained active as Professor Emeritus. Don served for several years as a consultant to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and may be remembered for his critique of the National Academy of Sciences BEIR III report (stating that their methodology “imposes a Delphic quality to the .. risk estimates”.) This led to his appointment as a member of the BEIR V committee. Don presented refresher courses at the AAPM, ASTRO and RSNA meetings and was active in the AAPM as a member or chair of several committees. He was the principal author of AAPM Report 43, which is essentially a critique of established clinical studies prior to 1992. He was co‐editor of the Proceedings of many symposia on Time, Dose and Fractionation held in Madison, Wisconsin. He received the AAPM lifetime Achievement award in 2004. Don's second wife of 46 years, Ann, predeceased him and he is survived by daughters Hillary and Emily, son John and two grandsons. Don was a true gentleman with a unique and erudite writing style illuminated by pithy quotations. If he had a fault it was, perhaps, that he did not realize how much smarter he was than the rest of us. This presentation draws heavily on a biography and video interview in the History and Heritage section of the AAPM website. The quote is his own. Andrzej Niemierko: Statistical modeling plays an essential role in modern medicine for quantitative evaluation of the effect of treatment. This session will feature an overview of statistical modeling techniques used for analyzing the many types of research data and an exploration of recent advances in new statistical modeling methodologies.
    Keywords: Statistical Analysis ; Cancer ; Vision Modeling ; Biomedical Modeling ; Careers ; Military Technology ; Systems Analysis ; Dosimetry ; Medical Physicists
    ISSN: 0094-2405
    E-ISSN: 2473-4209
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 01 October 2017, Vol.99(2), pp.E83-E83
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2017.06.789 Byline: K.H. Kang (1), E. Schapira (2), A. Niemierko (2), H.A. Shih (2) Author Affiliation: (1) Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (2) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA Article Note: (footnote) Author Disclosure: K.H. Kang: None. E. Schapira: None. A. Niemierko: None. H.A. Shih: Employee; Dartmouth Hitchcock. Honoraria; International Journal of Radiation Oncology, UpToDate. Advisory Board; Genentech. clinical operarions director; MGH Proton Therapy Center. clinical operational leader; Massachusetts General Hospital. editor; International Journal of Radiation Oncology. hospital site residency program director; Harv.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0360-3016
    E-ISSN: 1879-355X
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