Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Chemosphere, Jan, 2007, Vol.66(3), p.708(7)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2006.07.064 Byline: Jorge Nimptsch, Stephan Pflugmacher Keywords: Aquatic macrophytes; Eutrophication; Ammonia; Oxidative stress; ROS; Antioxidants Abstract: The effect of increased ammonia content on sub-acute biochemical responses was assessed in the rooted submersed aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum mattogrossense (common name: "Brazil Milfoil" or "Matogrosso Milfoil"), in a seven day aquarium experiment. The pH and temperature were monitored in order to determine the proportions of both ionized (NH.sub.4.sup.+) and un-ionized (NH.sub.3) forms of ammonia. Specific activities of several enzymes such as catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST's) were measured as well as the content of the soluble antioxidant glutathione and lipid peroxidation were determined as these parameters are considered as indicators of cell-level disorder. The results showed that ammonia is able to generate oxidative stress, expressed through an elevated GSH content and the enhancement of CAT, POD, GPx and GST's activities in treatments with elevated ammonia content. As the toxic mechanism of ammonia is a complex phenomenon, this work adds an additional point of view to explain in parts the oxidative stress generating effect of ammonia promoting oxidative stress. Additionally the different modes of action proposed by other research groups are discussed, thus trying to combine the various points of view. Author Affiliation: Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, RG Biochemical Regulation, Muggelseedamm 301, D-12587 Berlin, Germany Article History: Received 15 May 2006; Revised 19 July 2006; Accepted 22 July 2006
    Keywords: Antioxidants (Nutrients) ; Freshwater Ecology ; Glutathione ; Glutathione Transferase ; Oxidative Stress ; Ammonia ; Eutrophication
    ISSN: 0045-6535
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, April 1, 2012, Vol.78, p.296(14)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2011.11.037 Byline: Vanessa Burmester (a), Jorge Nimptsch (b), Claudia Wiegand (c) Keywords: Glutathione S-transferase; Superoxide dismutase; Catalase; Microcystins; Dreissena polymorpha; Unio tumidus Abstract: Freshwater mussels such as the invasive Dreissena polymorpha and the indigenous Unio tumidus nourish by high filtration rates and may accumulate cyanobacteria and their toxins during cyanobacterial blooms. Physiological adaptations to cyanotoxins enable organisms to endure cyanobacterial blooms but may differ between species. Biotransformation and excretion capacities for cyanobacteria and anthropogenic pollutants have been demonstrated for Dreissena polymorpha but less for unionid species. This study compares the activities of biotransformation (glutathione S-transferase, GST) and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD and catalase, CAT) in Dreissena polymorpha to Unio tumidus in response to cyanotoxin exposure (10[mu]gL.sup.-1 and 50[mu]gL.sup.-1 microcystin-LR, respectively, total microcystin from a cyanobacterial crude extract) for 24h and 7d exposure duration. Enzyme activities in Dreissena polymorpha were measured in the whole mussel tissue, digestive gland and in gills and in Unio tumidus in the digestive gland, gills, mantle, foot as well as in the remaining tissue. The sGST was elevated for the entire exposure period in the whole mussel tissue of Dreissena polymorpha but despite higher basal activities in digestive gland and gills of Unio tumidus, it was rather inhibited or unaltered in most of their tissues. Elevated SOD activity indicated oxidative stress response in Dreissena polymorpha, but not in Unio tumidus. The CAT activity was barely affected in both species, rather inhibited in Unio tumidus, despite again higher basal activities in digestive gland and remaining tissue. Compared to the indigenous Unio tumidus, the investigated biotransformation and oxidative stress combating enzymes respond stronger in the invasive Dreissena polymorpha. Author Affiliation: (a) Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Dept. Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Muggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin, Germany (b) Universidad Austral de Chile, Instituto de Ciencias Marinas and Limnologicas, Las Encinas 220, Valdivia, Chile (c) University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Biology, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark Article History: Received 26 July 2011; Revised 25 November 2011; Accepted 26 November 2011
    Keywords: Superoxides -- Physiological Aspects ; Thiols -- Physiological Aspects ; Enzymes -- Physiological Aspects ; Antioxidants (Nutrients) -- Physiological Aspects ; Glutathione Transferase -- Physiological Aspects ; Enzymology -- Physiological Aspects ; Mussels -- Physiological Aspects ; Marine Toxins -- Physiological Aspects
    ISSN: 0147-6513
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Chemosphere, October 2005, Vol.61(2), pp.147-57
    Description: We report the evaluation of changes in water quality, increasing pollution level, of a section of Suquía River basin (Córdoba, Argentina) by using Myriophyllum quitense as bioindicator in addition to the measurement of chemical parameters, combined with chemometrics (ANOVA, Cluster and Discriminant Analysis). Myriophyllum quitense was collected upstream from Córdoba city at an unpolluted site of Suquía River basin. After collection plants were transplanted to different sites with different pollution levels. Subsequent to transplantation plants were weekly collected from the original site as well as from transplantation stations. Water quality was evaluated throughout the transplantation experiment, while the use of this macrophyte as bioindicator was verified through the activation of its antioxidant defenses and biotransformation system. Myriophyllum quitense reacts to the pollution stress increasing the activity of glutathione-S-transferases (CDNB and Fluorodifen), glutathione reductase (GR) and peroxidase (POD). Elevated enzyme activities agreed to different pollution levels, especially inorganic nitrogen loads combined with elevated lead and aluminum concentrations, all of them originated by anthropogenic activities, thus presenting Myriophyllum quitense as a good biomonitor for assessment of water quality in this polluted aquatic ecosystem.
    Keywords: Eutrophication ; Heavy Metal Poisoning ; Magnoliopsida -- Enzymology
    ISSN: 0045-6535
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Science of the Total Environment, 15 December 2015, Vol.537, pp.129-138
    Description: Chile is the second largest producer of salmonids worldwide. The first step in the production of salmonids takes place in land-based aquacultures. However, the effects of the discharge from these aquacultures on stream dissolved organic matter (DOM) content, molecular composition and degradability are unknown. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the inputs of anthropogenic DOM from land-based aquaculture to the predominantly pristine river systems of North Patagonia. We hypothesized, that i) DOM exported from land-based aquaculture mainly consists of protein-like fluorescence (tyrosine and tryptophan) released from fish feces and food remains, and that ii) this DOM is highly degradable and therefore rapidly turned-over within the receiving streams. In the North Patagonian region we conducted a screening of ten land-based aquacultures and an intensive sampling campaign for one aquaculture. This was combined with longitudinal transects and a degradation experiment in order to couple the composition of DOM exported from land-based aquacultures to its degradability in streams. We measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration by high-temperature catalytic oxidation and DOM composition by fluorescence spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis. In the effluent of the ten screened aquacultures and in the repeated sampling of one aquaculture, we consistently found an increase of DOC concentrations and a dominance of protein-like fluorescence. The protein-like fluorescence rapidly disappeared downstream of the aquacultures, and in the degradation experiment. 21% of the DOC export from the repeatedly sampled aquaculture resulted from food addition and 76% from fish production. We conclude that large amounts of degradable DOM are exported from land-based aquacultures. This probably has strong effects on the ecological structure and function of North Patagonian streams, and similarly affected streams worldwide.
    Keywords: Aquaculture ; Organic Contamination ; Dissolved Organic Matter ; Fluorescence Spectroscopy ; Fish Farms ; Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    E-ISSN: 1879-1026
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    In: International Review of Hydrobiology, April 2016, Vol.101(1-2), pp.57-68
    Description: Byline: Jorge Nimptsch, Stefan Woelfl, Sebastian Osorio, Jose Valenzuela, Cristiana Moreira, Vitor Ramos, Raquel Castelo-Branco, Pedro Nuno Leao, Vitor Vasconcelos Blooms of cyanobacteria have negative effects on aquatic organisms and even on human health, since many species can synthesize dangerous toxins. Studies on cyanobacteria and their potential toxicity have been very scarce in Chile and have been limited to lakes of the central zone. Recently, North-Patagonian lakes, although characterized by their low nutrient concentration and low productivity, revealed also the presence of blooms of cyanobacteria, mainly constituted by Microcystis and Dolichospermum species (former Anabaena sp.). To identify potential toxicological risk associated to these blooms, six North Patagonian lakes (Lakes Caburgua, Villarrica, Calafquen, Panguipulli, Ranco, and Puyehue) were sampled during the summer period and screened for the presence of cyanobacteria and different toxins. Our results revealed for the first time the presence of microcystins in all studied lakes, whereas other toxins such as cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, and anatoxin were negative for all sites. By applying a genomic approach, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii was found in one lake (Lake Ranco) constituting the first report of this cyanobacterium in a Chilean lake. This study highlights the effectiveness of molecular methods as a first approach to describe cyanobacteria and their potential cyanotoxins in Chilean North-Patagonian lakes. Article Note: Handling Editor: Hendrik Schubert
    Keywords: Cyanobacteria ; Cyanotoxins ; Oligotrophic Lakes ; Patagonia
    ISSN: 1434-2944
    E-ISSN: 1522-2632
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 2008, Vol.69(3), pp.541-545
    Description: Leaf litter is one of the major input sources of organic carbon and nutrients in freshwater ecosystems. Throughout the degradation and leaching of leaf litter in freshwater bodies, “new born” substances are continuously generated and may aggregate to form humic substances (HS). Although the effect of HS on the stress physiology of aquatic macrophytes has been case of several investigations, the effect of these “new born” compounds (leaf litter breakdown products) on the stress physiology of aquatic plants has not been studied yet. Our results show that leaf litter degradation extracts (LLDEs) from oak, beech, and mixed oak and beech leaves have deleterious effects on the physiology of the aquatic bryophyte , decreasing photosynthetic activity and enhancing oxidative stress response. These findings suggest that leaf litter degradation extracts may be an important environmental factor influencing community structure within freshwater ecosystems.
    Keywords: Leaf Litter ; Aquatic Plants ; Degradation ; Phenolics ; Oxidative Stress ; Ecology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0147-6513
    E-ISSN: 1090-2414
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Chemosphere, 2007, Vol.66(4), pp.708-714
    Description: The effect of increased ammonia content on sub-acute biochemical responses was assessed in the rooted submersed aquatic macrophyte (common name: “Brazil Milfoil” or “Matogrosso Milfoil”), in a seven day aquarium experiment. The pH and temperature were monitored in order to determine the proportions of both ionized and un-ionized (NH ) forms of ammonia. Specific activities of several enzymes such as catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST’s) were measured as well as the content of the soluble antioxidant glutathione and lipid peroxidation were determined as these parameters are considered as indicators of cell-level disorder. The results showed that ammonia is able to generate oxidative stress, expressed through an elevated GSH content and the enhancement of CAT, POD, GPx and GST’s activities in treatments with elevated ammonia content. As the toxic mechanism of ammonia is a complex phenomenon, this work adds an additional point of view to explain in parts the oxidative stress generating effect of ammonia promoting oxidative stress. Additionally the different modes of action proposed by other research groups are discussed, thus trying to combine the various points of view.
    Keywords: Aquatic Macrophytes ; Eutrophication ; Ammonia ; Oxidative Stress ; Ros ; Antioxidants ; Chemistry ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0045-6535
    E-ISSN: 1879-1298
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Chemosphere, January 2007, Vol.66(4), pp.708-14
    Description: The effect of increased ammonia content on sub-acute biochemical responses was assessed in the rooted submersed aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum mattogrossense (common name: "Brazil Milfoil" or "Matogrosso Milfoil"), in a seven day aquarium experiment. The pH and temperature were monitored in order to determine the proportions of both ionized (NH4+) and un-ionized (NH3) forms of ammonia. Specific activities of several enzymes such as catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST's) were measured as well as the content of the soluble antioxidant glutathione and lipid peroxidation were determined as these parameters are considered as indicators of cell-level disorder. The results showed that ammonia is able to generate oxidative stress, expressed through an elevated GSH content and the enhancement of CAT, POD, GPx and GST's activities in treatments with elevated ammonia content. As the toxic mechanism of ammonia is a complex phenomenon, this work adds an additional point of view to explain in parts the oxidative stress generating effect of ammonia promoting oxidative stress. Additionally the different modes of action proposed by other research groups are discussed, thus trying to combine the various points of view.
    Keywords: Ammonia -- Toxicity ; Enzyme Activators -- Toxicity ; Eutrophication -- Drug Effects ; Oxidative Stress -- Drug Effects ; Plants -- Drug Effects ; Water Pollutants, Chemical -- Toxicity
    ISSN: 0045-6535
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 01 April 2012, Vol.78, pp.296-309
    Description: Freshwater mussels such as the invasive and the indigenous nourish by high filtration rates and may accumulate cyanobacteria and their toxins during cyanobacterial blooms. Physiological adaptations to cyanotoxins enable organisms to endure cyanobacterial blooms but may differ between species. Biotransformation and excretion capacities for cyanobacteria and anthropogenic pollutants have been demonstrated for but less for unionid species. This study compares the activities of biotransformation (glutathione S-transferase, GST) and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD and catalase, CAT) in to in response to cyanotoxin exposure (10 μg L and 50 μg L microcystin-LR, respectively, total microcystin from a cyanobacterial crude extract) for 24 h and 7 d exposure duration. Enzyme activities in were measured in the whole mussel tissue, digestive gland and in gills and in in the digestive gland, gills, mantle, foot as well as in the remaining tissue. The sGST was elevated for the entire exposure period in the whole mussel tissue of but despite higher basal activities in digestive gland and gills of , it was rather inhibited or unaltered in most of their tissues. Elevated SOD activity indicated oxidative stress response in , but not in The CAT activity was barely affected in both species, rather inhibited in , despite again higher basal activities in digestive gland and remaining tissue. Compared to the indigenous , the investigated biotransformation and oxidative stress combating enzymes respond stronger in the invasive . ► Biotransformation and antioxidant responses to cyanotoxins differ between species. ► Biotransformation via GST is elevated in but decreased in . ► Enzymes of the invasive respond stronger to cyanotoxins than in
    Keywords: Glutathione S-Transferase ; Superoxide Dismutase ; Catalase ; Microcystins ; Dreissena Polymorpha ; Unio Tumidus ; Ecology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0147-6513
    E-ISSN: 1090-2414
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Water and Health, 2016, Vol.14(4), pp.699-712
    Description: This study evaluates the water quality from Tri An Reservoir, a drinking water supply for several million people in southern Vietnam, in terms of cyanobacterial biomass and their potent toxins, microcystins (MCs). Cyanobacteria, their toxins and environmental parameters were monitored monthly...
    Keywords: Life Sciences ; Ecology, Environment ; Microcystins ; Environmental Factors ; Phytoplankton ; Cyanobacterial Biomass ; Engineering
    ISSN: 1477-8920
    E-ISSN: 19967829
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages