Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: JAMA, 12 May 2015, Vol.313(18), pp.1863-4
    Keywords: Baths ; Chlorhexidine -- Administration & Dosage ; Cross Infection -- Prevention & Control ; Disinfectants -- Administration & Dosage
    ISSN: 00987484
    E-ISSN: 1538-3598
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Intensive Care Medicine, 2015, Vol.41(7), pp.1351-1354
    Description: Byline: Michael J. Noto (1), Arthur P. Wheeler (1) Author Affiliation: (1) Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Ave South, T-1223, MCN, Nashville, TN, 37232-2650, USA Article History: Registration Date: 25/04/2015 Received Date: 31/03/2015 Accepted Date: 24/04/2015 Online Date: 19/06/2015
    Keywords: Anti-Infective Agents, Local -- Administration & Dosage ; Chlorhexidine -- Administration & Dosage ; Cross Infection -- Prevention & Control;
    ISSN: 0342-4642
    E-ISSN: 1432-1238
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Chest, May 2012, Vol.141(5), pp.1131-1132
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0012-3692
    E-ISSN: 1931-3543
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Intensive Care Medicine, 2015, Vol.41(7), p.1351(4)
    Description: Byline: Michael J. Noto (1), Arthur P. Wheeler (1) Author Affiliation: (1) Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Ave South, T-1223, MCN, Nashville, TN, 37232-2650, USA Article History: Registration Date: 25/04/2015 Received Date: 31/03/2015 Accepted Date: 24/04/2015 Online Date: 19/06/2015
    ISSN: 0342-4642
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of bacteriology, 01 September 2017, Vol.199(17)
    Description: and are commonly isolated from polymicrobial infections, such as wound infections and chronic respiratory infections of persons with cystic fibrosis. Despite their coisolation, produces substances toxic to , including pyocyanin, a blue-pigmented molecule that functions in virulence. Pyocyanin inhibits respiration, forcing it to derive energy from fermentation and adopt a small-colony variant (SCV) phenotype. The mechanisms by which sustains infection in the presence of pyocyanin are not clear. We sought to clarify the mechanisms of pyocyanin toxicity in as well as identify the staphylococcal factors involved in its resistance to pyocyanin toxicity. Nonrespiring SCVs are inhibited by pyocyanin through pyocyanin-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, indicating that pyocyanin toxicity is mediated through respiratory inhibition and ROS generation. Selection on pyocyanin yielded a menadione auxotrophic SCV capable of growth on high concentrations of pyocyanin. Genome sequencing of this isolate identified mutations in four genes, including , , NWMN_0006, and QsrR is a quinone-sensing repressor of quinone detoxification genes. Inactivation of resulted in significant pyocyanin resistance, and additional pyocyanin resistance was achieved through combined inactivation of and menadione biosynthesis. Pyocyanin-resistant has an enhanced capability to inactivate pyocyanin, suggesting QsrR-regulated gene products may degrade pyocyanin to alleviate toxicity. These findings demonstrate pyocyanin-mediated ROS generation as an additional mechanism of pyocyanin toxicity and define QsrR as a key mediator of pyocyanin resistance in Many bacterial infections occur in the presence of other microbes, where interactions between different microbes and the host impact disease. In patients with cystic fibrosis, chronic lung infection with multiple microbes results in the most severe disease manifestations. and are prevalent cystic fibrosis pathogens, and infection with both is associated with worse outcomes. These organisms have evolved mechanisms of competing with one another. For example, produces pyocyanin, which inhibits growth. Our research has identified how pyocyanin inhibits growth and how can adapt to survive in the presence of pyocyanin. Understanding how sustains infection in the presence of may identify means of disrupting these microbial communities.
    Keywords: Pseudomonas Aeruginosa ; Staphylococcus Aureus ; Cystic Fibrosis ; Pyocyanin
    ISSN: 00219193
    E-ISSN: 1098-5530
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: JAMA, 27 January 2015, Vol.313(4), pp.369-78
    Description: Daily bathing of critically ill patients with the broad-spectrum, topical antimicrobial agent chlorhexidine is widely performed and may reduce health care-associated infections. To determine if daily bathing of critically ill patients with chlorhexidine decreases the incidence of health care-associated infections. A pragmatic cluster randomized, crossover study of 9340 patients admitted to 5 adult intensive care units of a tertiary medical center in Nashville, Tennessee, from July 2012 through July 2013. Units performed once-daily bathing of all patients with disposable cloths impregnated with 2% chlorhexidine or nonantimicrobial cloths as a control. Bathing treatments were performed for a 10-week period followed by a 2-week washout period during which patients were bathed with nonantimicrobial disposable cloths, before crossover to the alternate bathing treatment for 10 weeks. Each unit crossed over between bathing assignments 3 times during the study. The primary prespecified outcome was a composite of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and Clostridium difficile infections. Secondary outcomes included rates of clinical cultures that tested positive for multidrug-resistant organisms, blood culture contamination, health care-associated bloodstream infections, and rates of the primary outcome by ICU. During the chlorhexidine bathing period, 55 infections occurred: 4 CLABSI, 21 CAUTI, 17 VAP, and 13 C difficile. During the control bathing period, 60 infections occurred: 4 CLABSI, 32 CAUTI, 8 VAP, and 16 C difficile. The primary outcome rate was 2.86 per 1000 patient-days during the chlorhexidine and 2.90 per 1000 patient-days during the control bathing periods (rate difference, -0.04; 95% CI, -1.10 to 1.01; P = .95). After adjusting for baseline variables, no difference between groups in the rate of the primary outcome was detected. Chlorhexidine bathing did not change rates of infection-related secondary outcomes including hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, blood culture contamination, or clinical cultures yielding multidrug-resistant organisms. In a prespecified subgroup analysis, no difference in the primary outcome was detected in any individual intensive care unit. In this pragmatic trial, daily bathing with chlorhexidine did not reduce the incidence of health care-associated infections including CLABSIs, CAUTIs, VAP, or C difficile. These findings do not support daily bathing of critically ill patients with chlorhexidine. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02033187.
    Keywords: Baths ; Chlorhexidine -- Administration & Dosage ; Cross Infection -- Prevention & Control ; Disinfectants -- Administration & Dosage
    ISSN: 00987484
    E-ISSN: 1538-3598
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 15 July 2013, Vol.188(2), pp.128-30
    Keywords: Respiration, Artificial -- Mortality ; Respiratory Insufficiency -- Therapy
    ISSN: 1073449X
    E-ISSN: 1535-4970
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Infection and immunity, October 2015, Vol.83(10), pp.4134-41
    Description: Acinetobacter baumannii is a common nosocomial pathogen capable of causing severe diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality in impaired hosts. Pattern recognition receptors, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), play a key role in pathogen detection and function to alert the immune system to infection. Here, we examine the role for TLR9 signaling in response to A. baumannii infection. In a murine model of A. baumannii pneumonia, TLR9(-/-) mice exhibit significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, increased extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination, and more severe lung pathology compared with those in wild-type mice. Following systemic A. baumannii infection, TLR9(-/-) mice have significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lungs, as well as decreased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. These results demonstrate that TLR9-mediated pathogen detection is important for host defense against the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.
    Keywords: Acinetobacter Infections -- Immunology ; Acinetobacter Baumannii -- Physiology ; Toll-Like Receptor 9 -- Immunology
    ISSN: 00199567
    E-ISSN: 1098-5522
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Infection and immunity, March 2017, Vol.85(3)
    Description: The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor capable of recognizing multiple pathogen-associated and danger-associated molecular patterns that contributes to the initiation and potentiation of inflammation in many disease processes. During infection, RAGE functions to either exacerbate disease severity or enhance pathogen clearance depending on the pathogen studied. is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing severe infections, including pneumonia and sepsis, in impaired hosts. The role of RAGE signaling in response to opportunistic bacterial infections is largely unknown. In murine models of pneumonia, RAGE signaling alters neither inflammation nor bacterial clearance. In contrast, RAGE mice systemically infected with exhibit increased survival and reduced bacterial burdens in the liver and spleen. The increased survival of RAGE mice is associated with increased circulating levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Neutralization of IL-10 in RAGE mice results in decreased survival during systemic infection that mirrors that of wild-type (WT) mice, and exogenous IL-10 administration to WT mice enhances survival in this model. These findings demonstrate the role for RAGE-dependent IL-10 suppression as a key modulator of mortality from Gram-negative sepsis.
    Keywords: Acinetobacter Baumannii ; Il-10 ; Rage ; Innate Immunity ; Pneumonia ; Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products ; Sepsis ; Sepsis ; Acinetobacter Infections -- Metabolism ; Acinetobacter Baumannii -- Physiology ; Interleukin-10 -- Biosynthesis ; Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00199567
    E-ISSN: 1098-5522
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages