Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Pediatrics, April 2002, Vol.109(4), pp.581-4
    Description: To examine the role of self-esteem in predicting coitus initiation in a population of early adolescents. Questionnaires assessing coital status, self-esteem, and pubertal maturation were collected from 188 participants who had not engaged in coitus by enrollment. Data were collected longitudinally while the participants were in the seventh and ninth grade. Ages ranged from 12 to 14 (mean: 12.50; standard deviation: 0.57) at Time 1 and from 14 to 16 (mean: 14.30; standard deviation: 0.49) at Time 2. Boys with higher self-esteem ratings at Time 1 were more likely to initiate intercourse by Time 2. Girls with higher self-esteem at Time 1 were more likely to remain virgins than girls with lower self-esteem. Pubertal status was unrelated to initiation of coitus in this sample. Self-esteem, regardless of pubertal status, predicted coitus transition differentially in boys and girls. Results from this longitudinal study seem to fit within traditional problem behavior theory.
    Keywords: Self Concept ; Adolescent Behavior -- Psychology ; Coitus -- Psychology
    ISSN: 00314005
    E-ISSN: 1098-4275
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, March 2010, Vol.46(3), pp.232-237
    Description: To examine the distribution of and factors associated with event-level heterosexual anal sex and of event-level condom use during anal sex among adolescent women. Adolescent women (N = 387; age 14–17 years at enrollment) were recruited from primary care clinics for a longitudinal cohort study of sexually transmitted infections and sexual behavior. Data were taken from daily sexual diaries; generalized estimating equation logistic regression assessed the likelihood of anal sex or condom use during anal sex on a given day. Heterosexual anal intercourse is a small but nonrandom event-level component in adolescent women's sexual behavior. About 30% of anal sex events were condom protected. Mood, partner, and situational factors predicted anal sex, but not condom use during anal sex; within-day and recent behavior factors were the strongest influences on both outcomes. Our findings suggest the importance of providers' screening adolescent women patients during office visits about anal sex and about condom use during anal sex, as well as asking questions about the context of these behaviors to appropriately tailor risk reduction counseling.
    Keywords: Anal Sex ; Condoms ; Adolescent Women ; Diary Data ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, January 2011, Vol.48(1), pp.87-93
    Description: Little is known about how adolescent sexual behaviors develop and the influence of personal or perceived social attitudes. We sought to describe how personal, perceived peer, and perceived family attitudes toward adolescent sexual activity influence sexual behaviors of adolescent females' over time. Between the years of 1999 and 2006, 358 English-speaking female adolescents, aged 14–17 years, were recruited from three urban adolescent clinics. Participants completed quarterly and annual questionnaires over a span of 4 years. Primary outcomes included engagement in any of the following eight sexual behaviors: kissing, having breasts touched, having genitals touched, touching partners' genitals, oral giving, oral receiving, anal, or vaginal sex. Three attitudinal scales assessed personal importance of abstinence, perceived peer beliefs about when to have sex, and perceived family beliefs that adolescent sex is negative. We used generalized estimating equations to identify predictors of each sexual behavior and compared whether personal, perceived peer, or perceived family attitudes predicted sexual behaviors over time. The odds of reporting each sexual behavior increased with age but were lower among those whose personal or perceived family attitudes were less positive. Participants' personal attitudes toward adolescent sex were the strongest predictor of engagement in all eight sexual behaviors even after controlling for perceived peer and perceived family attitudes. Female adolescent's personal attitudes toward abstinence appear to be the strongest predictor of engagement in a variety of sexual behaviors. Efforts to influence adolescent attitudes toward abstinence may be an important approach to reducing sexual behaviors that increase the risk of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.
    Keywords: Adolescents ; Adolescent Sexual Behavior ; Attitudes ; Peer Group ; Family ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescence, 2011, Vol.34(4), pp.675-684
    Description: Developing a sexual self-concept is an important developmental task of adolescence; however, little empirical evidence describes this development, nor how these changes are related to development in sexual behavior. Using longitudinal cohort data from adolescent women, we invoked latent growth curve analysis to: (1) examine reciprocal development in sexual self-concept (sexual openness, sexual esteem and sexual anxiety) over a four year time frame; (2) describe the relationship of these trajectories with changes in sexual behavior. We found significant transactional effects between these dimensions and behavior: sexual self-concept evolved during adolescence in a manner consistent with less reserve, less anxiety and greater personal comfort with sexuality and sexual behavior. Moreover, we found that sexual self-concept results from sexual behavior, as well as regulates future behavior.
    Keywords: Adolescent Women ; Sexual Self-Concept ; Sexual Behavior ; Latent Growth Curve Modeling ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0140-1971
    E-ISSN: 1095-9254
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of infectious diseases, 01 January 2010, Vol.201(1), pp.42-51
    Description: Repeated Chlamydia trachomatis infections are common among young sexually active women. The relative frequency of reinfection and antibiotic treatment failure is undefined. Adolescent women enrolled in a longitudinal cohort had behavioral and sexually transmitted infection assessments performed every 3 months, including amplification tests for C. trachomatis, ompA genotyping, and interviews and diary entries to document sex partner-specific coitus and event-specific condom use. Repeated infections were classified as reinfection or treatment failure by use of an algorithm. All infections for which treatment outcomes were known were used to estimate the effectiveness of antibiotic use. We observed 478 episodes of infection among 210 study participants; 176 women remained uninfected. The incidence rate was 34 episodes/100 woman-years. Of the women who were infected, 121 experienced 1 repeated infections, forming 268 episode pairs; 183 pairs had complete data available and were classified using the algorithm. Of the repeated infections, 84.2% were definite, probable, or possible reinfections; 13.7% were probable or possible treatment failures; and 2.2% persisted without documented treatment. For 318 evaluable infections, we estimated 92.2% effectiveness of antibiotic use. Most repeated chlamydial infections in this high-incidence cohort were reinfections, but repeated infections resulting from treatment failures occurred as well. Our results have implications for male screening and partner notification programs and suggest the need for improved antibiotic therapies.
    Keywords: Anti-Bacterial Agents -- Therapeutic Use ; Azithromycin -- Therapeutic Use ; Chlamydia Infections -- Drug Therapy
    ISSN: 00221899
    E-ISSN: 1537-6613
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    In: Pediatrics, April, 1995, Vol.95(4), p.528(6)
    Description: Early onset of puberty and lower levels of cognitive complexity appear to be associated independently with increased likelihood of risky behaviors in teenagers. As teenagers mature, they move from simple to complex and concrete to abstract thinking and self-centeredness to increased ability to consider others. A group of 1613 eighth and ninth graders completed a questionnaire about alcohol and drug use, sexual activity, minor delinquency, and suicide attempts and a test that measured social and psychological maturity. They also answered questions about the timing of certain pubertal events. Teenagers with higher levels of cognitive complexity as well as teenagers who entered puberty at older ages were less likely to engage in risk behaviors regardless of chronological age. This suggests that health care providers should base counseling endeavors on physical maturity rather than age and should suit education efforts to the maturity level of the child.
    Keywords: Health Risk Communication -- Social Aspects ; Risk Taking -- Social Aspects ; Adolescence -- Health Aspects
    ISSN: 0031-4005
    E-ISSN: 10984275
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    In: JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, August 12, 1998, Vol.280(6), p.564(1)
    Description: Testing sexually active teenage girls twice a year for chlamydia infection could be cost-effective in the long run. A 1998 study found a high rate of chlamydia infection in teenage girls. New diagnostic tests allow patients to collect specimens in the privacy of their own home and send them to a laboratory. However, many teens may worry about confidentiality. In addition, many third-party payers may not be willing to pay for semi-annual testing. However, complications of chlamydia such as pelvic inflammatory disease cost an estimated $2.4 billion in the US each year.
    Keywords: Chlamydia Infections -- Diagnosis ; Health Screening -- Evaluation ; Teenage Girls -- Medical Examination
    ISSN: 0098-7484
    E-ISSN: 15383598
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Adolescent Health, 2009, Vol.44(4), pp.309-315
    Description: This review article summarizes the available literature on adolescent reactive arthritis. A review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment guidelines will be helpful to better diagnose and treat reactive arthritis.
    Keywords: Adolescent ; Reactive Arthritis ; Reiter Syndrome ; Arthritis ; Spondyloarthritis ; Enthesitis-Related Arthritis ; Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 1054-139X
    E-ISSN: 1879-1972
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2011, Vol.38(3), pp.239-243
    Description: BACKGROUND:: It is widely believed that marijuana use and alcohol use directly intercede on successful condom use. However, measurement differences and inconsistent findings in past research remain unclear whether marijuana and alcohol work directly to influence condom behavior, or spuriously function through other factors that actually reflect an increased likelihood of vaginal sex. The current study prospectively disentangles the association of marijuana and alcohol use on condom behavior among adolescent women. METHODS:: Young women (N = 387; 14–17 years) provided daily sexual diaries as part of a longitudinal cohort study (1999–2009) of sexual behavior and sexual relationships. To separate the effects of marijuana and alcohol use on vaginal sex from condom use (when vaginal sex occurs), we estimated a 3-category outcome variable (no vaginal sex, vaginal sex with a condom, vaginal sex without a condom), alternating no sex (Model 1) and sex without a condom (Model 2) as the referent categories. Generalized estimating equation multinomial logistic regression adjusted odds ratios for multiple sexual events from the same young woman over time. RESULTS:: Subjects contributed 14,538 coital events; 30% of these events were condom-protected. Neither marijuana nor alcohol use was directly associated with lower condom use; the strongest effect of condom use (adjusted odds ratio) and nonuse was performance of these behaviors in the past week. CONCLUSIONS:: This study finds no evidence of a relationship between marijuana or alcohol use and condom nonuse. Both condom use and nonuse were identified as consistent behavioral patterns, regardless of the effect of marijuana and alcohol use.
    Keywords: Juvenile Drug Abuse -- Research ; Juvenile Drug Abuse -- Health Aspects ; Condoms -- Health Aspects ; Condoms -- Research ; Condoms -- Usage ; Juvenile Drinking -- Health Aspects ; Juvenile Drinking -- Research ; Marijuana -- Usage ; Teenage Sexual Behavior -- Health Aspects ; Teenage Sexual Behavior -- Research;
    ISSN: 0148-5717
    E-ISSN: 15374521
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: American journal of public health, February 2002, Vol.92(2), pp.211-3
    Description: This study sought to describe condom use over time in new and established adolescent relationships. The outcome variable was time (in days) until first unprotected coital event. Analyses involved comparisons of Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards models. Survival functions for the 2 relationship groups were significantly different. However, by 21 days the curves had converged: 43% of new and 41% of established relationships involved no unprotected coital events. Time to first unprotected coital event was significantly longer in new than in established relationships. Prolongation of condom use in ongoing relationships may be a useful intervention to prevent sexually transmitted diseases.
    Keywords: Adolescent Behavior ; Contraception Behavior ; Safe Sex ; Condoms -- Statistics & Numerical Data ; Sexually Transmitted Diseases -- Prevention & Control
    ISSN: 0090-0036
    E-ISSN: 15410048
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages