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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, October 2015, Vol.529, pp.969-979
    Description: Coupling surface and subsurface water flow in fully integrated hydrological codes is becoming common in hydrological research; however, the coupling of surface–subsurface solute transport has received much less attention. Previous studies on fully integrated solute transport focus on small scales, simple geometric domains, and have not utilised many different field data sources. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the inclusion of both flow and solute transport in a 3D, fully integrated catchment model, utilising high resolution observations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from a wetland complex during a rainfall event. A sensitivity analysis is performed to span a range of transport conditions for the surface–subsurface boundary (e.g. advective exchange only, advection plus diffusion, advection plus full mechanical dispersion) and subsurface dispersivities. The catchment model captures some aspects of observed catchment behaviour (e.g. solute discharge at the catchment outlet, increasing discharge from wetlands with increased stream discharge, and counter-clockwise concentration–discharge relationships), although other known behaviours are not well represented in the model (e.g. slope of concentration–discharge plots). Including surface–subsurface solute transport aids in evaluating internal model processes, however there are challenges related to the influence of dispersion across the surface–subsurface interface, and non-uniqueness of the solute transport solution. This highlights that obtaining solute field data is especially important for constraining integrated models of solute transport.
    Keywords: Solute Transport ; Surface–Subsurface Coupling ; Integrated Modelling ; Catchment Modelling ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, June 2018, Vol.561, pp.1081-1093
    Description: Coupled water and energy balance models have become increasingly popular for estimating groundwater recharge, because of the integration of energy and water balances and sometimes carbon balance. The additional balances are thought to constrain the water balance and as a result should help reduce the uncertainty of groundwater recharge. However, these models usually have a large number of parameters. The uncertainty of these parameters may result in a large uncertainty in groundwater recharge estimates. This study aims to assess the potential uncertainty of groundwater recharge estimated from a widely used water and energy model. It is largely based on annual pasture vegetation in the lower part of the Campaspe catchment in southeast Australia. A Monte Carlo analysis method was employed to examine potential uncertainties introduced by different types of errors. The results show that for a mean rainfall of 398 mm/y and using a particular set of pedotransfer functions for deriving soil hydraulic parameters, the estimated recharge ranged from 7 to 144 mm/y due to the uncertainty in vegetation parameters. This upper bound of the recharge range increased to 236 mm/y when using different sets of pedotransfer functions. Through several synthetic test cases, this study shows that soil moisture time series may not offer much help for reducing recharge uncertainty, whereas evapotranspiration time series are able to reduce recharge uncertainty by more than 50%. The reduction in recharge uncertainty steadily improves as the uncertainty in observations reduces.
    Keywords: Groundwater Recharge ; Soil Water Balance ; Water and Energy Balance Model ; Uncertainty Analysis ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Modelling and Software, April, 2014, Vol.54, p.39(14)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2013.12.011 Byline: Li Li, Holger R. Maier, Daniel Partington, Martin F. Lambert, Craig T. Simmons Abstract: Recursive digital filters (RDFs) are one of the most commonly used methods of baseflow separation. However, how accurately they estimate baseflow and how to select appropriate values of filter parameters is generally unknown. In this paper, the output of fully integrated surface water/groundwater (SW/GW) models is used to obtain optimal parameters for, and assess the accuracy of, three commonly used RDFs under a range of physical catchment characteristics and hydrological inputs. The results indicate that the Lyne and Hollick (LH) filter performs better than the Boughton and Eckhardt filters, over a larger range of conditions. In addition, the optimal values of the filter parameters vary considerably for all three filters, depending on catchment characteristics and hydrological inputs. The dataset of the 66 catchment characteristics and hydrological inputs, as well as the corresponding simulated total streamflow and baseflow hydrographs obtained using the SW/GW model, can be downloaded as Supplementary material. Author Affiliation: (a) School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005, South Australia, Australia (b) National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training and School of the Environment, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia, Australia Article History: Received 14 August 2013; Revised 17 December 2013; Accepted 18 December 2013
    Keywords: Employee Performance Appraisals -- Analysis ; Hydrology -- Analysis ; Streamflow -- Analysis
    ISSN: 1364-8152
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Reviews of Geophysics, 06/2017, Vol.55(2), pp.287-309
    Description: The streambed constitutes the physical interface between the surface and the subsurface of a stream. Across all spatial scales, the physical properties of the streambed control surface water-groundwater interactions. Continuous alteration of streambed properties such as topography or hydraulic conductivity occurs through erosion and sedimentation processes. Recent studies from the fields of ecology, hydrogeology, and sedimentology provide field evidence that sedimentological processes themselves can be heavily influenced by surface water-groundwater interactions, giving rise to complex feedback mechanisms between sedimentology, hydrology, and hydrogeology. More explicitly, surface water-groundwater exchanges play a significant role in the deposition of fine sediments, which in turn modify the hydraulic properties of the streambed. We explore these feedback mechanisms and critically review the extent of current interaction between the different disciplines. We identify opportunities to improve current modeling practices. For example, hydrogeological models treat the streambed as a static rather than a dynamic entity, while sedimentological models do not account for critical catchment processes such as surface water-groundwater exchange. We propose a blueprint for a new modeling framework that bridges the conceptual gaps between sedimentology, hydrogeology, and hydrology. Specifically, this blueprint (1) fully integrates surface-subsurface flows with erosion, transport, and deposition of sediments and (2) accounts for the dynamic changes in surface elevation and hydraulic conductivity of the streambed. Finally, we discuss the opportunities for new research within the coupled framework. Key Points Complex feedback mechanisms exist between sedimentological processes and surface water-groundwater flow in streams There is currently no quantitative approach that allows exploration of these feedback mechanisms A blueprint of a mathematical model is suggested that allows coupling of sedimentology, hydrology, and hydrogeology in streambeds
    Keywords: Sedimentation ; Hydrology ; Groundwater Flow ; Surface Water ; Models ; Sedimentation ; Feedback ; Water ; Erosion ; Ecology ; Sediments ; Surface Water ; Control Systems ; Erosion ; Sediments ; Control Surfaces ; Streambeds ; Ecological Monitoring ; Topography ; Exploration ; Streambeds ; Groundwater ; Groundwater ; Sedimentation ; Surface Water ; Fields ; Water Flow ; Sediments ; Exploration ; Deposition ; Erosion ; Hydrogeology ; Framework ; Ecology ; Hydrology ; Geohydrology ; Topography ; Permeability Coefficient ; Sedimentology ; Groundwater Movement ; Ground Water ; Hydrology ; Catchments ; Surface Water ; Topography ; Deposition ; Soil Erosion ; Rivers ; Ecology ; Hydrology ; Feedback ; Spatial Discrimination ; Topography (Geology) ; Erosion ; Streams ; Slopes (Topography) ; Feedback ; Interactions ; Topography ; Physical Properties ; Streams ; Modelling ; Sediments ; Groundwater ; Hydrology ; Catchment Area ; Hydrogeology ; Properties ; Topography ; Sedimentology ; Physical Properties ; Sediments ; Sedimentation ; Banks (Topography) ; Physical Properties ; Hydraulic Properties ; Soil Erosion ; Mathematical Models ; Surface Water ; Hydrology ; Hydrogeological Models ; Sedimentation ; Hydrologic Models ; Groundwater ; Groundwater Flow ; Hydraulic Conductivity ; Exchanging ; Surface-Groundwater Relations;
    ISSN: Reviews of Geophysics
    E-ISSN: 87551209
    E-ISSN: 19449208
    Source: Wiley (via CrossRef)
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  • 5
    In: Hydrological Processes, 15 April 2013, Vol.27(8), pp.1276-1285
    Description: Studies employing integrated surface–subsurface hydrological models (ISSHMs) have utilized a variety of test cases to demonstrate model accuracy and consistency between codes. Here, we review the current state of ISSHM testing and evaluate the most popular ISSHM test cases by comparing the hydrodynamic processes simulated in each case to the processes found in well‐characterized, real‐world catchments and by comparing their general attributes to those of successful benchmark problems from other fields of hydrogeology. The review reveals that (1) ISSHM testing and intercode comparison have not adopted specific test cases consistently; (2) despite the wide range of ISSHM metrics available for model testing, only two model performance diagnostics are typically adopted: the catchment outflow hydrograph and the catchment water balance; (3) in intercode comparisons, model performance is usually judged by evaluating only one performance diagnostic: the catchment outflow hydrograph; and (4) ISSHM test cases evaluate a small number of hydrodynamic processes that are largely uniform across the model domain, representing a limited selection of the processes of interest in well‐characterized, real‐world catchments. ISSHM testing would benefit from more intercode comparisons using a consistent set of test cases, aimed at evaluating more catchment processes (e.g. flooding) and using a wider range of simulation diagnostics (e.g. pressure head distributions). To achieve this, a suite of test case variations is required to capture the relevant catchment processes. Finally, there is a need for additional ISSHM test problems that compare model predictions with hydrological observations from intensively monitored field sites and controlled laboratory experiments. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Keywords: Fully Integrated Modelling ; Surface–Subsurface Interaction ; Code Testing ; Catchment‐Scale Simulation
    ISSN: 0885-6087
    E-ISSN: 1099-1085
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  • 6
    In: Eos, 04/27/2018, Vol.99
    ISSN: Eos
    E-ISSN: 2324-9250
    Source: American Geophysical Union (via CrossRef)
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  • 7
    In: Water Resources Research, October 2014, Vol.50(10), pp.7750-7765
    Description: Tracer hydrograph separation has been widely applied to identify streamflow components, often indicating that pre‐event water comprises a large proportion of stream water. Previous work using numerical modeling suggests that hydrodynamic mixing in the subsurface inflates the pre‐event water contribution to streamflow when derived from tracer‐based hydrograph separation. This study compares the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion, both within the subsurface and at the surface‐subsurface boundary, on the tracer‐based pre‐event water contribution to streamflow. Using a fully integrated surface‐subsurface code, we simulate two hypothetical 2‐D hillslopes with surface‐subsurface solute exchange represented by different solute transport conceptualizations (i.e., advective and dispersive conditions). Results show that when surface‐subsurface solute transport occurs via advection only, the pre‐event water contribution from the tracer‐based separation agrees well with the hydraulically determined value of pre‐event water from the numerical model, despite dispersion occurring within the subsurface. In this case, subsurface dispersion parameters have little impact on the tracer‐based separation results. However, the pre‐event water contribution from the tracer‐based separation is larger when dispersion at the surface‐subsurface boundary is considered. This work demonstrates that dispersion within the subsurface may not always be a significant factor in apparently large pre‐event water fluxes over a single rainfall event. Instead, dispersion at the surface‐subsurface boundary may increase estimates of pre‐event water contribution. This work also shows that solute transport in numerical models is highly sensitive to the representation of the surface‐subsurface interface. Hence, models of catchment‐scale solute dynamics require careful treatment and sensitivity testing of the surface‐subsurface interface to avoid misinterpretation of real‐world physical processes. Dispersion at surface‐subsurface boundary and in subsurface is compared Boundary dispersion greatly affects solute transport in integrated models High dispersive flux at boundary can influence tracer hydrograph separation
    Keywords: Integrated Modeling ; Solute Transport ; Rainfall‐Runoff ; Dispersion ; Hydrograph Separation
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences, 2018, Vol.379, pp.1-12
    Description: Management of water resources requires understanding of the hydrology and hydrogeology, as well as the policy and human drivers and their impacts. This understanding requires relevant inputs from a wide range of disciplines, which will vary depending on the specific case study. One approach to gain understanding of the impact of climate and society on water resources is through the use of an integrated modelling process that engages stakeholders and experts in specifics of problem framing, co-design of the underpinning conceptual model, and discussion of the ensuing results. In this study, we have developed such an integrated modelling process for the Campaspe basin in northern Victoria, Australia. The numerical model built has a number of components: – Node/link based surface water hydrology module based on the IHACRES rainfall-streamflow model– Distributed groundwater model for the lower catchment (MODFLOW)– Farm decision optimisation module (to determine irrigation requirements)– Policy module (setting conditions on availability of water based on existing rules)– Ecology module (determining the impacts of available streamflow on platypus, fish and river red gum trees) The integrated model is component based and has been developed in Python, with the MODFLOW and surface water hydrology model run in external programs, controlled by the master program (in Python). The integrated model has been calibrated using historical data, with the intention of exploring the impact of various scenarios (future climate scenarios, different policy options, water management options) on the water resources. The scenarios were selected based on workshops with, and a social survey of, stakeholders in the basin regarding what would be socially acceptable and physically plausible options for changes in management. An example of such a change is the introduction of a managed aquifer recharge system to capture dam overflows, and store at least a portion of this in the aquifer, thereby increasing the groundwater resource as well as reducing the impact of existing pumping levels.
    Keywords: Geography;
    ISSN: Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences
    E-ISSN: 2199-899X
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Modelling and Software, April 2014, Vol.54, pp.39-52
    Description: Recursive digital filters (RDFs) are one of the most commonly used methods of baseflow separation. However, how accurately they estimate baseflow and how to select appropriate values of filter parameters is generally unknown. In this paper, the output of fully integrated surface water/groundwater (SW/GW) models is used to obtain optimal parameters for, and assess the accuracy of, three commonly used RDFs under a range of physical catchment characteristics and hydrological inputs. The results indicate that the Lyne and Hollick (LH) filter performs better than the Boughton and Eckhardt filters, over a larger range of conditions. In addition, the optimal values of the filter parameters vary considerably for all three filters, depending on catchment characteristics and hydrological inputs. The dataset of the 66 catchment characteristics and hydrological inputs, as well as the corresponding simulated total streamflow and baseflow hydrographs obtained using the SW/GW model, can be downloaded as Supplementary material.
    Keywords: Baseflow ; Recursive Digital Filters ; Framework ; Prediction ; Regression Models ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Computer Science ; Ecology
    ISSN: 1364-8152
    E-ISSN: 1873-6726
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Modelling and Software, April 2015, Vol.66, pp.57-68
    Description: Conceptual rainfall runoff models are used extensively in practice, as they provide a good balance between transparency and computational and data requirements. However, the degree to which they are able to represent underlying physical processes is poorly understood. This is because the performance of such models is generally assessed based on their ability to match total streamflow, rather than component processes. In this paper, the ability of the Australian Water Balance Model (AWBM) to represent baseflow and quickflow is assessed for 66 synthetic catchments with different physical characteristics and hydrological inputs under seven calibration regimes utilising a shuffled complex evolution (SCE) algorithm. The “observed” total-, base- and quick-flow hydrographs for these catchments are generated using HydroGeoSphere. The results indicate that while AWBM is generally able to match total streamflow well, the same does not apply to baseflow and quickflow, suggesting that these processes are not represented well by AWBM.
    Keywords: Australian Water Balance Model ; Calibration ; Baseflow ; Regression Models ; Hydrogeosphere ; Virtual Laboratory ; Integrated Surface Water/Groundwater Model ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Computer Science ; Ecology
    ISSN: 1364-8152
    E-ISSN: 1873-6726
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