Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 17 August 2010, Vol.107(33), pp.14823-7
    Description: Coping with intermittent social stress is an essential aspect of living in complex social environments. Coping tends to counteract the deleterious effects of stress and is thought to induce neuroadaptations in corticolimbic brain systems. Here we test this hypothesis in adult squirrel monkey males exposed to intermittent social separations and new pair formations. These manipulations simulate conditions that typically occur in male social associations because of competition for limited access to residency in mixed-sex groups. As evidence of coping, we previously confirmed that cortisol levels initially increase and then are restored to prestress levels within several days of each separation and new pair formation. Follow-up studies with exogenous cortisol further established that feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is not impaired. Now we report that exposure to intermittent social separations and new pair formations increased hippocampal neurogenesis in squirrel monkey males. Hippocampal neurogenesis in rodents contributes to spatial learning performance, and in monkeys we found that spatial learning was enhanced in conditions that increased hippocampal neurogenesis. Corresponding changes were discerned in the expression of genes involved in survival and integration of adult-born granule cells into hippocampal neural circuits. These findings support recent indications that stress coping stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in adult rodents. Psychotherapies designed to promote stress coping potentially have similar effects in humans with major depression.
    Keywords: Adaptation, Psychological -- Physiology ; Hippocampus -- Growth & Development ; Neurogenesis -- Physiology ; Stress, Psychological -- Physiopathology
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Hormones and Behavior, March 2013, Vol.63(3), pp.411-417
    Description: Adverse early life experience, such as childhood abuse, neglect, and trauma, increases lifetime risk for mental illness. To investigate underlying mechanisms, the maternal separation (MS) paradigm was developed and validated as an animal model of early adversity in rats, reliably effecting long-term changes to anxiety, gene expression, and stress response. However, across-species validation of core findings in mice has met with limited success. To re-visit parameters governing the effectiveness of MS in mice, this study investigated the effect of MS on maternal care, offspring behavior, and offspring stress-induced corticosterone response in the c57bl/6 mouse strain. The results from this study suggest that: (i) levels of maternal care increase as a function of separation duration immediately after daily MS, but long-term care remains unchanged; and (ii) c57bl/6 mice are resilient to MS, exhibiting subtle decreases in anxiety and unchanged stress-induced corticosterone response as adults, irrespective of separation duration. ► Effectiveness of maternal separation in the c57bl/6 mouse strain investigated. ► Transient, but not long-term, increases in post-separation maternal care. ► C57bl/6 mice are stress-resilient to maternal separation. ► Offspring exhibits a subtle decrease in anxiety-like behaviors. ► Offspring basal and stress-induced corticosterone response remain unchanged.
    Keywords: Maternal Separation ; Early Handling ; Maternal Care ; Postnatal Development ; C57bl/6 Mouse ; Corticosterone ; Early Life Stress ; Anxiety ; Hpa Axis ; Medicine ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0018-506X
    E-ISSN: 1095-6867
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Brain Research, June 17, 2013, Vol.1515, p.29(10)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2013.03.032 Byline: Lawrence S. Own, Rimsha Iqbal, Paresh D. Patel Abstract: Adverse early life experiences (aELEs), such as child abuse, neglect, or trauma, increase lifetime vulnerability for mental illness. In this study, aELEs were modeled in c57bl/6 mice using the maternal separation (MS) paradigm, in which pups were separated for 180min/day (MS180), 15min/day (MS15), or left undisturbed (AFR) from postnatal day 2-14. As adults, pups that experienced MS15 or MS180 demonstrated decreases in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 and serotonin transporter mRNA in the dorsal raphe dorsalis and ventralis, and increases in glucocorticoid receptor mRNA in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. To investigate factors underlying shared expression between MS conditions, dam on-nest time and DNA methylation at the TPH2 promoter and 5' UTR were assessed. Post-reunion on-nest time increased as a function of separation duration, potentially serving as a mitigating factor underlying similar expression between MS conditions. TPH2 DNA methylation remained unchanged, suggesting changes in TPH2 mRNA are not mediated by changes in DNA methylation of this region. The shared pattern of expression between MS15 and MS180 conditions suggests a species- or strain- specific response to MS unique to c57bl/6 mice. Author Affiliation: (a) Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, University of Michigan Medical Center, 5698 BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Place, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200, USA (b) Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical Center, 5062 BSRB, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA (c) Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Michigan, 4163 Undergraduate Science Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200, USA (d) Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, University of Michigan, 1190 Undergraduate Science Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2200, USA Article History: Accepted 13 March 2013
    Keywords: Serotonin -- Analysis ; House Mouse -- Analysis ; Genetic Research -- Analysis ; Tryptophan -- Analysis ; Mental Disorders -- Analysis ; Methylation -- Analysis ; Neurosciences -- Analysis ; Child Abuse -- Analysis ; Glucocorticoids -- Analysis ; Rna -- Analysis ; Gene Expression -- Analysis ; Hydroxylases -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0006-8993
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Brain research, 2013, Vol.1515, pp.29-38
    Description: Adverse early life experiences (aELEs), such as child abuse, neglect, or trauma, increase lifetime vulnerability for mental illness. In this study, aELEs were modeled in c57bl/6 mice using the maternal separation (MS) paradigm, in which pups were separated for 180min/day (MS180), 15min/day (MS15), or left undisturbed (AFR) from postnatal day 2–14. As adults, pups that experienced MS15 or MS180 demonstrated decreases in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 and serotonin transporter mRNA in the dorsal raphe dorsalis and ventralis, and increases in glucocorticoid receptor mRNA in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. To investigate factors underlying shared expression between MS conditions, dam on-nest time and DNA methylation at the TPH2 promoter and 5′ UTR were assessed. Post-reunion on-nest time increased as a function of separation duration, potentially serving as a mitigating factor underlying similar expression between MS conditions. TPH2 DNA methylation remained unchanged, suggesting changes in TPH2 mRNA are not mediated by changes in DNA methylation of this region. The shared pattern of expression between MS15 and MS180 conditions suggests a species- or strain- specific response to MS unique to c57bl/6 mice. ; p. 29-38.
    Keywords: Tryptophan ; Serotonin ; Mice ; Pups ; Glucocorticoid Receptors ; Child Abuse ; Behavior Disorders ; Hippocampus ; Adults ; Dna Methylation ; Gene Expression ; Life Events
    ISSN: 0006-8993
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Brain Research, 17 June 2013, Vol.1515, pp.29-38
    Description: Adverse early life experiences (aELEs), such as child abuse, neglect, or trauma, increase lifetime vulnerability for mental illness. In this study, aELEs were modeled in c57bl/6 mice using the maternal separation (MS) paradigm, in which pups were separated for 180 min/day (MS180), 15 min/day (MS15), or left undisturbed (AFR) from postnatal day 2–14. As adults, pups that experienced MS15 or MS180 demonstrated decreases in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 and serotonin transporter mRNA in the dorsal raphe dorsalis and ventralis, and increases in glucocorticoid receptor mRNA in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. To investigate factors underlying shared expression between MS conditions, dam on-nest time and DNA methylation at the TPH2 promoter and 5′ UTR were assessed. Post-reunion on-nest time increased as a function of separation duration, potentially serving as a mitigating factor underlying similar expression between MS conditions. TPH2 DNA methylation remained unchanged, suggesting changes in TPH2 mRNA are not mediated by changes in DNA methylation of this region. The shared pattern of expression between MS15 and MS180 conditions suggests a species- or strain- specific response to MS unique to c57bl/6 mice.
    Keywords: Early Life Stress ; Serotonin ; Maternal Separation ; Hpa Axis ; Early Handling ; C57bl/6 Mice ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0006-8993
    E-ISSN: 1872-6240
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, March 2012, Vol.37(3), pp.421-437
    Description: Potent glucocorticoids (GC) administered early in life have improved premature infant survival dramatically. However, these agents may increase the risk for physical, neurological and behavior alterations. Anxiety, depression and attention difficulties are commonly described in adolescent and young adult survivors of prematurity. In the present study we administered vehicle, dexamethasone, or hydrocortisone to Sprague-Dawley rat pups on postnatal days 5 and 6, mimicking a short term clinical protocol commonly used in human infants. Two systems that are implicated in the regulation of stress and behavior were assessed: the limbic–hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis [LHPA; glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors within] and the Serotonin (5-HT) system. We found that as adults, male Sprague-Dawley pups treated with GC showed agent specific altered growth, anxiety-related behavior, changes in corticoid response to novelty and gene expression changes within LHPA and 5-HT-related circuitry. The data suggest that prolonged GC-receptor stimulation during the early neonatal period can contribute to the development of individual differences in stress response and anxiety-related behavior later in life.
    Keywords: Dexamethasone/Administration & Dosage/Adverse Effects ; Hydrocortisone/Administration & Dosage/Adverse Effects ; Body Weight/Drug Effects ; Animals ; Newborn/Growth & Development ; Anxiety Behavior/Attention ; Stress Response ; Adult ; Rat ; Medicine ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0306-4530
    E-ISSN: 1873-3360
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Chest, October 2010, Vol.138(4), pp.56A-56A
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0012-3692
    E-ISSN: 1931-3543
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, October 2016, Vol.55(10), pp.S311-S312
    Description: Objectives: In this session, the presenters will review the role of a partnership between the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, Genesee Community Mental Health, Children's Health Access Program, and the State of Michigan Department of Health and Human Services in bringing the Michigan Child Collaborative Care Program (MC3) to the Flint and Genesee Counties. The presentation will highlight the role the lead crisis as an additional adverse childhood events for youth/families. We will demonstrate how programs such as MC3 assist in providing diagnostic clarification, psychopharmacology consultations, and treatment recommendations in a county where PCPs prescribe many of the psychotropic medications as a result of shortages of child and adolescent psychiatrists. We also will discuss tools that can be helpful in screening for trauma/toxic stress and review progress with regard to MC3 initiatives taking place in Flint, Michigan, USA. Methods: MC3 meets with state/regional leaders to establish relationships and appropriate clinical offices for enrollment. MC3 hires behavioral health specialists for the local areas who are available for researching/providing available resources and connecting PCP/CAPs for consultations. Telepsychiatry is available for more complex cases. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations are followed, and all consultations are documented in appropriate areas within electronic medical record/ database. Results: Qualitative data from primary care providers demonstrate increased confidence among primary care providers and a 98 percent rate of satisfaction. To date, there have been 2,122 unique patients through MC3, including 74 perinatal patients, among whom 19 percent had a history of trauma. Patients (N = 2,048) consisted of children/young adults (ages 0-26 years), of whom 269 (13 percent) had a history of trauma; however, these types of trauma were often misdiagnosed by PCPs as attentional disorders. These youths were on medications (mean number of medications = 3.23). In general, most phone consultations take 20-30 minutes but provide a thoughtful differential that is well received by PCPs. Conclusions: MC3 provides a mechanism whereby child psychiatry access can be leveraged through PCPs in underserved areas. In regions with high rates of trauma/poverty, such programs are invaluable in getting children with PTSD and related disorders to gain access to appropriate services and reduce unnecessary use of neuroleptic drugs. MC3 is providing a valuable resource for primary care providers in the Flint area.
    Keywords: Medicine ; Social Welfare & Social Work
    ISSN: 0890-8567
    E-ISSN: 1527-5418
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.), 01 May 2016, Vol.67(5), pp.574-7
    Description: Mental health treatment approaches based on character strengths can be used to complement the traditional focus on functional impairment. The study tested use of a character strengths-based intervention to enhance the self-esteem and self-efficacy of psychiatrically hospitalized youths. Eighty-one hospitalized adolescents were randomly assigned to intervention or comparison groups. The intervention used the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth to discover character strengths and incorporate them into coping skills. Self-efficacy and self-esteem were measured at baseline, postintervention, two weeks, and three months. Self-esteem and self-efficacy initially increased in both groups, but only the intervention group showed sustained improvement. The intervention was associated with increased self-efficacy at two weeks and increased self-efficacy and self-esteem at three months. A brief, easily administered character strengths-based intervention may be an adjunctive tool in the treatment of psychiatrically hospitalized youths.
    Keywords: Adaptation, Psychological ; Self Concept ; Self Efficacy ; Inpatients -- Psychology ; Mental Disorders -- Therapy
    ISSN: 10752730
    E-ISSN: 1557-9700
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), 2014, Vol.1211, pp.237-43
    Description: In situ hybridization-assisted punches (IFAP) are a low-cost method for extracting tissue from frozen slide-mounted sections as thin as 12 μm. The method synergizes well with standard histological workflows and uses in situ hybridization to target corresponding slide-mounted cryosections that contain the region of interest. Liquid beads of M-1 embedding matrix are applied and snap frozen, binding the matrix to the underlying tissue. Bead-tissue complexes are removed and DNA extracted using a high-salt method. IFAP-extracted DNA is suitable for downstream DNA methylation analysis.
    Keywords: DNA Methylation ; DNA -- Analysis ; Frozen Sections -- Methods ; In Situ Hybridization -- Methods
    ISSN: 10643745
    E-ISSN: 1940-6029
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages