Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
Topic
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, 30 March 2011, Vol.133(12), pp.4438-46
    Description: A series of monocarbonyl iron complexes in the formal oxidation states 0, +1, and +2 are accessible when supported by a tetradentate tris(phosphino)silyl ligand (SiP(iPr)(3) = [Si(o-C(6)H(4)PiPr(2))(3)](-)). X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of these carbonyl complexes establish little geometrical change about the iron center as a function of oxidation state. It is possible to functionalize the terminal CO ligand of the most reduced carbonyl adduct by addition of SiMe(3)(+) to afford a well-defined iron carbyne species, (SiP(iPr)(3))Fe≡C-OSiMe(3). Single-crystal XRD data of this iron carbyne derivative reveal an unusually short Fe≡C-OSiMe(3) bond distance (1.671(2) Å) and a substantially elongated C-O distance (1.278(3) Å), consistent with Fe-C carbyne character. The overall trigonal bipyramidal geometry of (SiP(iPr)(3))Fe≡C-OSiMe(3) compares well with that of the corresponding carbonyls, (SiP(iPr)(3))Fe(CO)(-), (SiP(iPr)(3))Fe(CO), and (SiP(iPr)(3))Fe(CO)(+). Details regarding the electronic structure of the carbyne complex have been explored via the collection of comparative Mössbauer data for all of the complexes featured and also via DFT calculations. In sum, these data point to a strongly π-accepting Fischer-type carbyne ligand that confers stability to a low-valent iron(0) rather than high-valent iron(IV) center.
    Keywords: Carbamates -- Chemistry ; Carbon Monoxide -- Chemistry ; Iron -- Chemistry ; Organometallic Compounds -- Chemical Synthesis ; Silicon Compounds -- Chemistry
    ISSN: 00027863
    E-ISSN: 1520-5126
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, August 20, 2013, Vol.110(34), p.14102(8)
    Description: The present article presents an up-to-date account of the current media relations of scientists, based on a comprehensive analysis of relevant surveys. The evidence suggests that most scientists consider visibility in the media important and responding to journalists a professional duty--an attitude that is reinforced by universities and other science organizations. Scientific communities continue to regulate media contacts with their members by certain norms that compete with the motivating and regulating influences of public information departments. Most scientists assume a two-arena model with a gap between the arenas of internal scientific and public communication. They want to meet the public in the public arena, not in the arena of internal scientific communication. Despite obvious changes in science and in the media system, the orientations of scientists toward the media, as well as the patterns of interaction with journalists, have their roots in the early 1980s. Although there is more influence on public communication from the science organizations and more emphasis on strategic considerations today, the available data do not indicate abrupt changes in communication practices or in the relevant beliefs and attitudes of scientists in the past 30 y. Changes in the science-media interface may be expected from the ongoing structural transformation of the public communication system. However, as yet, there is little evidence of an erosion of the dominant orientation toward the public and public communication within the younger generation of scientists. mass media | science communication | science journalism www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1212745110
    Keywords: Scientists -- Public Relations ; Scientific Communication -- Methods ; Mass Media -- Social Aspects ; Science Journalism -- Methods
    ISSN: 0027-8424
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    In: Social Work, 2011, Vol. 56(4), pp.355-365
    Description: Social work's weak presence in the field of corrections is peculiar, given that those involved in the criminal and juvenile justice systems are undeniably among the vulnerable and oppressed populations that the profession has traditionally served. The field of juvenile probation shares roots with the profession of social work but lacks a strong connection to it today. Traditional explanations focus on the reluctance of social workers to engage clients in coercive environments, but historical analysis suggests that this account tells only part of the story. An examination of social work's origins shows that issues involving gender stereotyping and the failure of theory help explain social workers' diminished role in juvenile probation. In recent decades, changes in attitudes regarding gender and working with coerced clients, as well as evidence of effective interventions, suggest that social workers may be ready to reengage meaningfully with juvenile probation and other corrections work. This article outlines steps in professional education and workforce development that would move the profession toward reintegrating social work into the corrections field.
    Keywords: Corrections ; Juvenile Justice ; Probation ; Social Work Practice
    ISSN: 0037-8046
    E-ISSN: 1545-6846
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2015, Vol.108(5), pp.802-822
    Description: A growing body of evidence demonstrates the practical and theoretical importance of numeracy in evaluations and choices involving numeric information, an importance that goes beyond simple accuracy in performing mathematical computations. Numeric competency, however, may be multiply determined, but little research has examined potentially separable influences in evaluations and choice. In the present article, we describe 3 numeric competencies and begin to disentangle their effects. Participants ( N = 111) completed a series of tasks in 4 1-hr sessions. We first examined relations between objective numeracy, subjective numeracy, and symbolic-number mapping abilities (thought to tap into internal representations of numeric magnitude and the mapping of symbolic numbers onto those representations) using a structural equation model. We then explored their dissociations in numeric and nonnumeric tasks. Higher vs. lower scores in objective numeracy were associated with explicit number operations, including number comparisons and calculations. Those with more vs. less exact mapping had better numeric memory (but not nonnumeric) and produced valuations that were closer to (but did not equal) a risky gamble’s expected value, indicating a link with superior number intuitions. Finally, individuals lower vs. higher in subjective numeracy had more negative emotional reactions to numbers and were less motivated and/or confident in numeric tasks. It was less clear whether subjective numeracy might also relate to more general motivations and metacognitions involving nonnumeric information. We conclude that numeric competencies should be used in a more targeted fashion to understand their multiple mechanisms in people’s evaluations, choices, and life outcomes.
    Keywords: Numeracy ; Evaluation ; Judgment And Decision Making
    ISSN: 0022-3514
    E-ISSN: 1939-1315
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2012, Vol.102(1), pp.200-213
    Description: Dispositional styles of coping with threat influence memory for threatening information. In particular, sensitizers excel over repressors in their memory for threatening information after long retention intervals, but not after short ones. We therefore suggested that sensitizers, but not repressors, employ active maintenance processes during the retention interval to selectively retain threatening material. Sensitive maintenance was studied in 2 experiments in which participants were briefly exposed to threatening and nonthreatening pictures (Experiment 1, N = 128) or words (Experiment 2, N = 145). Following, we administered unannounced recognition tests before and after an intervening task that generated either high or low cognitive load, assuming that high cognitive load would impede sensitizers' memory maintenance of threatening material. Supporting our hypotheses, the same pattern of results was obtained in both experiments: Under low cognitive load, sensitizers forgot less threat material than repressors did; no such differences were observed under high cognitive load.
    Keywords: Coping Styles ; Rehearsal ; Retention Interval ; Repression ; Sensitizer
    ISSN: 0022-3514
    E-ISSN: 1939-1315
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: The journal of physical chemistry. B, 28 May 2015, Vol.119(21), pp.6349-56
    Description: We examine the capabilities and foundations of three landmark rate theories: harmonic transition state theory, classical nucleation theory, and the Marcus theory of electron transfer. Each of the three classic rate theories is widely used to predict rates and trends. They are also used "in reverse" to interpret experimental data with no computation at all. Their common foundations include a quasi-equilibrium assumption and dimensionality reduction to a physically meaningful, one-dimensional, and broadly applicable reaction coordinate. Many applications lie beyond the scope of the classic theories, so rare events research has pursued trajectory-based methods that efficiently predict accurate rate constants even when the reaction coordinate and mechanistic details are unknown. Trajectory based rare events methods achieved these ambitious goals, but (by construction) they provide rates rather than mechanistic understanding. We briefly discuss recent efforts to identify reaction coordinates, including methods which provide abstract statistically defined coordinates and those which identify physical collective variables. Finally, we note some natural synergies between existing simulation methods which might help discover simple and powerful quasi-equilibrium theories for the many applications that fall beyond the scope of the classic rate theories.
    Keywords: Experimental-Data ; Simulation-Procedure ; Nucleation ; Electron-Transition ; Transition-State ; Harmonic-Component ; Physical-Variable ; Coaction ; Experimentelle Daten ; Simulationsmethode ; Nukleation ; Elektronentransfer ; Übergangszustand ; Oberschwingung ; Physikalische Größe ; Synergie ; Chemistry;
    ISSN: 15206106
    E-ISSN: 1520-5207
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, June 2013, Vol.42, pp.S38-S39
    Description: Purpose for the ProgramAchieving Baby Friendly designation is supported by the following: Healthy People's 2020 objective to increase exclusive breastfeeding of mothers during the early postpartum period, the February 2012 American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendation that mothers exclusively breastfeed their infants for the first 6 months after birth; and the Joint Commission's perinatal core measure for exclusive breastfeeding while in the hospital. Proposed ChangeTo implement Baby Friendly Initiatives and continue to revise practices to meet updated guidelines to maintain Baby Friendly designation. Implementation, Outcomes, and EvaluationBaby Friendly components can be met with resistance from staff and physicians. Baby Friendly requires that staff reverse ideas, such as sending infants to the nursery so that mothers can sleep, offering supplementation of formula until lactation is established, using pacifiers to satisfy suckling, and keeping mothers and healthy infants apart during medical procedures. Becoming Baby Friendly often demands a change in practice toward family‐centered care. The program teaches breastfeeding skills to mothers, supports skin‐to‐skin contact after birth, promotes rooming‐in as standard of care for healthy infants, and offers breastfeeding resources upon discharge.Myths and obstacles of Baby Friendly practice can present obstacles to implementation. The most common myths are that mothers will not have a choice in how to feed their infant, hospital cost will increase significantly, and the requirement of staff education will be difficult to meet. Obstacles to meeting the Baby Friendly goals include supplying consistent information to parents and staff regarding breastfeeding, keeping moms and infants together with rooming‐in as standard of care, and changing practice to meet skin‐to‐skin contact requirements.Customer satisfaction measured before and after implementation of Baby Friendly practices to the question “I learned how to feed my baby properly” demonstrated a significant increase. This same result is reflected in the perinatal care core measure of exclusive breastfeeding. Implications for Nursing PracticeMany changes to current practice were implemented to meet the Baby Friendly Initiative guidelines. Though these were initially perceived as obstacles, they are now part of every day practice and have not only increased patient satisfaction, but have increased nursing satisfaction as well.
    Keywords: Baby Friendly Initiatives ; Obstacles ; Education ; Customer Satisfaction ; Medicine ; Education ; Nursing
    ISSN: 0884-2175
    E-ISSN: 1552-6909
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Chemical Physics Letters, Dec 3, 2012, Vol.554, p.248(6)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cplett.2012.10.051 Byline: Baron Peters Abstract: Display Omitted Author Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, United States Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, United States Article History: Received 18 July 2012; Accepted 17 October 2012
    ISSN: 0009-2614
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Chemical Engineering Science, March 26, 2012, Vol.71, p.367(8)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2011.12.013 Byline: Baron Peters (a)(b) Keywords: Diffusion limitations; Heterogeneous catalysis; Batch reactor; Catalyst screening; Reaction engineering; Reactor modeling Abstract: Headspace gas diffusion can affect measurements of catalytic rate constants in unstirred batch reactors when the reaction occurs in a small pile of catalyst within the reactor. To quantify these effects, the governing equations for catalysis in a round-bottom flask were solved numerically in a toroidal coordinate system. We also introduce a simpler model reactor geometry that preserves the essential characteristics of a typical bench-scale flask-reactor. The preserved characteristics include the reactor volume, an averaged diffusion length scale, and the area of the catalyst pile. An eigenfunction expansion solution for the model reactor closely parallels the full numerical solutions in the round-bottom flask reactor, thus confirming the validity of the simplified model reactor. Solutions for the model reactor show that concentrations measured above the catalyst pile decay exponentially to equilibrium even when transport limitations are important. Therefore, exponential decay rates in these reactors should not be equated to first order (or pseudo-first order) reaction rate constants without first checking carefully for diffusion limitations. Two dimensionless parameters govern the reactor performance. Effectiveness factors are computed for unstirred catalytic batch reactors over a wide range of the two dimensionless parameters. Our findings show quantitatively when headspace stirring is and is not necessary. When stirring is inconvenient or impossible, the tabulated effectiveness factors can be used to design reactors that are small enough, with kinetics that are slow enough, and with the catalyst dispersed over a large enough area to avoid headspace diffusion limitations. Author Affiliation: (a) Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA (b) Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA Article History: Received 19 September 2011; Revised 23 November 2011; Accepted 10 December 2011
    Keywords: Heterogeneous Catalysis -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0009-2509
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Emergency Nursing, May, 2013, Vol.39(3), p.280(9)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jen.2012.03.017 Byline: Karen Peters Article Note: (footnote) Earn Up to 9.0 CE Hours. See page 317., Section Editors: Pat Clutter, RN, MEd, CEN, FAEN, and Carole Rush, RN, MEd, CEN, FAEN, Submissions to this column are encouraged and may be sent to Pat Clutter, RN, MEd, CEN, FAEN prclutter@gmail.com or Carole Rush, RN, MEd, CEN, FAEN carole.rush@albertahealthservices.ca
    Keywords: Nurses ; Human Smuggling ; Emergency Nursing
    ISSN: 0099-1767
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages