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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    Description: Thesis (Ph.D.)--State University of New York at Buffalo, 2008. Title from PDF title page (viewed on Dec. 4, 2008) Available through UMI ProQuest Digital Dissertations. Thesis adviser: Campagnari, Anthony A. Includes bibliographical references.
    Source: Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations
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  • 2
    In: Infection and Immunity, 2004, Vol. 72(10), p.6160
    ISSN: 0019-9567
    ISSN: 00199567
    Source: American Society of Microbiology
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  • 3
    In: Infection and Immunity, 2007, Vol. 75(6), p.2929
    ISSN: 0019-9567
    ISSN: 00199567
    Source: American Society of Microbiology
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  • 4
    In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, October 2015, Vol.230(10), pp.2552-2578
    ISSN: 0021-9541
    E-ISSN: 1097-4652
    Source: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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  • 5
    In: Infection and Immunity, 2001, Vol. 69(8), p.5166
    Description: Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium associated with active chronic periodontitis lesions, produces several proteolytic enzymes that are thought to be involved in host colonization, perturbation of the immune system, and tissue destruction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of Arg- and Lys-gingipains produced by P. gingivalis to its growth. Although all of the proteins studied were degraded by P. gingivalis, only human serum albumin and transferrin supported growth during serial transfers in a chemically defined medium (CDM). Growth studies with site-directed gingipain-deficient mutants of P. gingivalis revealed that inactivation of both gingipains prevents growth, whereas inactivation of either Arg- or Lys-gingipain activity extended the doubling times to 33 or 13 h, respectively, compared to 9 h for the parent strain. Growth of the mutants and the parent strain was similar when the CDM was supplemented with a protein hydrolysate instead of human serum albumin. Incubation of resting P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 cells with fluorophore-labeled albumin indicated that the proteolytic fragments generated by the gingipains were internalized by the bacterial cells. Internalization of fluorophore-labeled albumin fragments was reduced or completely inhibited in the proteinase-deficient mutants. Interestingly, gingival crevicular fluid samples from diseased periodontal sites contained low-molecular-mass albumin fragments, whereas samples from healthy sites did not. The critical role of proteinases in the growth of P. gingivalis was further investigated using specific Arg- and Lys-gingipain inhibitors. Adding the inhibitors to CDM containing albumin revealed that leupeptin (Arg-gingipain A and B inhibitor) was more efficient at inhibiting growth than cathepsin B inhibitor II (Lys-gingipain inhibitor). Our study suggests that Arg-gingipains and, to a lesser extent, Lys-gingipain play an important role in the growth of P. gingivalis in a defined medium containing a human protein as the sole carbon and nitrogen source.
    Keywords: Porphyromonas Gingivalis ; Periodontitis ; Carbon Sources ; Nitrogen Sources ; Gingipains ; Dental and Oral ; Gingipains;
    ISSN: 0019-9567
    ISSN: 00199567
    E-ISSN: 10985522
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  • 6
    In: Journal of Bacteriology, Nov, 1999, Vol.181(21-22), p.6914(8)
    Description: Research was conducted to understand the implications of altering Hpr protein composition in the regulation of sugar transport system in oral streptococci. Results show that the amino acid substitution did not abolish phosphorylation of the protein and enabled cells to catabolize other sugars in the presence of glucose.
    Keywords: Substitution Reactions -- Physiological Aspects ; Phosphorylation -- Analysis ; Amino Acid Structure-activity Relationships ; Sugar
    ISSN: 0021-9193
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 7
    In: Infection and Immunity, 2003, Vol. 71(8), p.4742
    ISSN: 0019-9567
    ISSN: 00199567
    Source: American Society of Microbiology
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, 2015, Vol.230(10), p.2552(27)
    Description: To purchase or authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jcp.25014/abstract Byline: Jane L. Roberts, Mehrad Tavallai, Aida Nourbakhsh, Abigail Fidanza, Tanya Cruz-Luna, Elizabeth Smith, Paul Siembida, Pascale Plamondon, Kelly A. Cycon, Christopher D. Doern, Laurence Booth, Paul Dent Prior tumor cell studies have shown that the drugs sorafenib (Nexavar) and regorafenib (Stivarga) reduce expression of the chaperone GRP78. Sorafenib/regorafenib and the multi-kinase inhibitor pazopanib (Votrient) interacted with sildenafil (Viagra) to further rapidly reduce GRP78 levels in eukaryotes and as single agents to reduce Dna K levels in prokaryotes. Similar data were obtained in tumor cells in vitro and in drug-treated mice for: HSP70, mitochondrial HSP70, HSP60, HSP56, HSP40, HSP10, and cyclophilin A. Prolonged 'rafenib/sildenafil treatment killed tumor cells and also rapidly decreased the expression of: the drug efflux pumps ABCB1 and ABCG2; and NPC1 and NTCP, receptors for Ebola/Hepatitis A and B viruses, respectively. Pre-treatment with the 'Rafenib/sildenafil combination reduced expression of the Coxsackie and Adenovirus receptor in parallel with it also reducing the ability of a serotype 5 Adenovirus or Coxsackie virus B4 to infect and to reproduce. Sorafenib/pazopanib and sildenafil was much more potent than sorafenib/pazopanib as single agents at preventing Adenovirus, Mumps, Chikungunya, Dengue, Rabies, West Nile, Yellow Fever, and Enterovirus 71 infection and reproduction. 'Rafenib drugs/pazopanib as single agents killed laboratory generated antibiotic resistant E. coli which was associated with reduced Dna K and Rec A expression. Marginally toxic doses of 'Rafenib drugs/pazopanib restored antibiotic sensitivity in pan-antibiotic resistant bacteria including multiple strains of bla.sub.kpc Klebsiella pneumoniae. Thus, Dna K is an antibiotic target for sorafenib, and inhibition of GRP78/Dna K has therapeutic utility for cancer and for bacterial and viral infections. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 2552-2578, 2015. [c] 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Keywords: Cancer – Health Aspects ; Bacterial Infections – Health Aspects ; Heat Shock Proteins – Health Aspects
    ISSN: 0021-9541
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 9
    In: The Journal of Bacteriology, 1999, Vol. 181(22), p.6914
    Description: One of life's inevitable disappointments—one felt often by scientists and artists, but not only by them—comes from ex- pecting others to share the particularities of one's own sense of awe and wonder. This truth came home to me recently when I picked up Michael Guillen's fine book Five Equations That Changed the World (4) and discovered that my equation—the one that shaped my scientific career—was not considered one of the five. I met this equation in the winter of 1952-1953 when Eman- uel Suter, the bacteriology and immunology instructor in the integrated Medical Sciences program at Harvard Medical School, brought three very young colleagues to help teach the instructional laboratory of this innovative course. In this way we 20 privileged students met Boris Magasanik, Marcus Brooke, and H. Edwin Umbarger and were plunged into bac- terial physiology. They had designed a laboratory experience to introduce us to contemporary issues and cutting-edge techniques in 1950s bacterial physiology. As I remember, one objective was to study diauxic growth by varying the limiting amount of glucose added to a minimal medium containing a secondary carbon source and inoculated with an enteric bacterium. A second objective was to construct the steps in a biosynthetic pathway by examining the abilities of various compounds to satisfy the nutritional needs of auxotrophic mutants. Both experiments required measuring the growth of bacteria, the former as a kinetic process. For me, encountering the bacterial growth curve was a trans- forming experience. As my partner and I took samples of the culture at intervals to measure optical density and plotted the results on semilogarithmic paper, we saw, after the lag period, a straight line developing. . .beautiful in precision and remark- able in speed. As the line extended itself straight-edge true, I imagined what was happening in the flask—living protoplasm being made from glucose and salts as the initial cells (Klebsiella aerogenes, they were called then) grew and divided. The liquid in the flask progressed from having a barely discernible haze to a milky whiteness thick with the stuff of life, all within a very brief Boston winter afternoon. Mutably specific autocatalysis, the physicist Erwin Schrodinger had declared a few years ear- lier (28), was the defining characteristic of living systems, and I had just witnessed the working out of the mathematical state- ment of that property, dN/dt 5 kN (where N is the number of cells or any extensive property thereof, t is time, and k is the first-order rate constant (in reciprocal time units)). I had never before seen such a clear display of autocatalysis. Its mathematical elegance and simplicity—but more impor- tantly, its invitation to explore—affected me profoundly. The first-order rate constant k in the growth equation seemed to me the ideal tool by which to assess the state of a culture of cells, i.e., the rate at which they were performing life, as it were. I elected to pursue my Ph.D. studies with Boris Ma- gasanik, studying the molecular basis of diauxic growth. Over the ensuing half-century, close analysis of growth curves was to be a central feature of my work, as I followed my intense curiosity (read obsession) about the processes that form living matter from salts and sugar. Catabolite repression, the growth rate-related regulation of stable RNA synthesis, the isolation and use of temperature-sensitive mutants in essential functions (particularly aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases), and the molecular responses of bacteria to heat and other stresses—all these studies depended on inferences and deductions from the growth behavior of bacterial cultures. For anyone interested in the synthesis of protoplasm, bac- teria are the system to study (reviewed in reference 17). With four billion years of practice they have perfected the art of growing in many environments, and they outclass all other known forms of life in their rate of metabolism geared for autocatalysis. The first-order rate constant k is most conve-
    Keywords: Biology;
    ISSN: 0021-9193
    ISSN: 00219193
    E-ISSN: 10985530
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, 2003, Vol.221(2), pp.181-185
    Keywords: Periodontitis ; Gingipain ; Collagenase ; Porphyromonas Gingivalis ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1097
    E-ISSN: 1574-6968
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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