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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 2010, Vol.87(1), pp.11-20
    Description: Visual traces of iron reduction and oxidation are linked to the redox status of soils and have been used to characterise the quality of agricultural soils. We tested whether this feature could also be used to explain the spatial pattern of the natural vegetation of tidal habitats. If so, an easy assessment of the effect of rising sea level on tidal ecosystems would be possible. Our study was conducted at the salt marshes of the northern lagoon of Venice, which are strongly threatened by erosion and rising sea level and are part of the world heritage “Venice and its lagoon”. We analysed the abundance of plant species at 255 sampling points along a land–sea gradient. In addition, we surveyed the redox morphology (presence/absence of red iron oxide mottles in the greyish topsoil horizons) of the soils and the presence of disturbances. We used indicator species analysis, correlation trees and multivariate regression trees to analyse relations between soil properties and plant species distribution. Plant species with known sensitivity to anaerobic conditions (e.g. ) were identified as indicators for oxic soils (showing iron oxide mottles within a greyish soil matrix). Plant species that tolerate a low redox potential (e.g. ) were identified as indicators for anoxic soils (greyish matrix without oxide mottles). Correlation trees and multivariate regression trees indicate the dominant role of the redox morphology of the soils in plant species distribution. In addition, the distance from the mainland and the presence of disturbances were identified as tree-splitting variables. The small-scale variation of oxygen availability plays a key role for the biodiversity of salt marsh ecosystems. Our results suggest that the redox morphology of salt marsh soils indicates the plant availability of oxygen. Thus, the consideration of this indicator may enable an understanding of the heterogeneity of biological processes in oxygen-limited systems and may be a sensitive and easy-to-use tool to assess human impacts on salt marsh ecosystems.
    Keywords: Coastal Wetlands ; Iron Oxides ; Halophyte Ecology ; Regression Trees ; Indicator Species Analysis ; Classification of Marsh Soils ; Biology ; Oceanography
    ISSN: 0272-7714
    E-ISSN: 1096-0015
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  • 2
    Language: English
    Description: Visual traces of iron reduction and oxidation are linked to the redox status of soils and have been used to characterise the quality of agricultural soils.We tested whether this feature could also be used to explain the spatial pattern of the natural vegetation of tidal habitats. If so, an easy assessment of the effect of rising sea level on tidal ecosystems would be possible. Our study was conducted at the salt marshes of the northern lagoon of Venice, which are strongly threatened by erosion and rising sea level and are part of the world heritage 'Venice and its lagoon'. We analysed the abundance of plant species at 255 sampling points along a land-sea gradient. In addition, we surveyed the redox morphology (presence/absence of red iron oxide mottles in the greyish topsoil horizons) of the soils and the presence of disturbances. We used indicator species analysis, correlation trees and multivariate regression trees to analyse relations between soil properties and plant species distribution. Plant species with known sensitivity to anaerobic conditions (e.g. Halimione portulacoides) were identified as indicators for oxic soils (showing iron oxide mottles within a greyish soil matrix). Plant species that tolerate a low redox potential (e.g. Spartina maritima) were...
    Keywords: Event Label ; Latitude Of Event ; Longitude Of Event ; Environment ; Horizon ; Depth, Sediment/Rock ; Depth, Top/Min ; Depth, Bottom/Max ; Ph ; Salinity ; Carbon In Carbonate ; Carbon, Organic, Total ; Nitrogen, Total ; Carbon/Nitrogen Ratio ; Sulfur, Total ; Sodium ; Potassium ; Magnesium ; Calcium ; Cation Exchange Capacity ; Iron Oxides
    Source: DataCite
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Chemical Health & Safety, January 2018, Vol.25(1), pp.12-23
    Description: With large amounts of nanotoxicology studies delivering contradicting results and a complex, moving regulatory framework, potential risks surrounding nanotechnology appear complex and confusing. Many researchers and workers in different sectors are dealing with nanomaterials on a day-to-day basis, and have a requirement to define their assessment/management needs. This paper describes an industry-tailored strategy for risk assessment of nanomaterials and nano-enabled products, which builds on recent research outcomes. The approach focuses on the creation of a risk profile for a given nanomaterial (e.g., determine which materials and/or process operation pose greater risk, where these risks occur in the lifecycle, and the impact of these risks on society), using state-of-the-art safety assessment approaches/tools (ECETOC TRA, Stoffenmanager Nano and ISO/TS 12901-2:2014). The developed nanosafety strategy takes into account cross-sectoral industrial needs and includes (i) Information Gathering: Identification of nanomaterials and hazards by a demand-driven questionnaire and on-site company visits in the context of human and ecosystem exposures, considering all companies/parties/downstream users involved along the value chain; (ii) Hazard Assessment: Collection of all relevant and available information on the intrinsic properties of the substance (e.g., peer reviewed (eco)toxicological data, material safety data sheets), as well as identification of actual recommendations and benchmark limits for the different nano-objects in the scope of this projects; (iii) Exposure Assessment: Definition of industry-specific and application-specific exposure scenarios taking into account operational conditions and risk management measures; (iv) Risk Characterisation: Classification of the risk potential by making use of exposure estimation models (i.e., comparing estimated exposure levels with threshold levels); (v) Refined Risk Characterisation and Exposure Monitoring: Selection of individual exposure scenarios for exposure monitoring following the OECD Harmonized Tiered Approach to refine risk assessment; (vi) Risk Mitigation Strategies: Development of risk mitigation actions focusing on risk prevention.
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 1871-5532
    E-ISSN: 1878-0504
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Advanced healthcare materials, January 2019, Vol.8(1), pp.e1801233
    Description: The unique photoluminescent properties of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have attracted worldwide research interest and inspired many bioanalytical applications. The anti-Stokes emission with long luminescence lifetimes, narrow and multiple absorption and emission bands, and excellent photostability enable background-free and multiplexed detection in deep tissues. So far, however, in vitro and in vivo applications of UCNPs are restricted to the laboratory use due to safety concerns. Possible harmful effects may originate from the chemical composition but also from the small size of UCNPs. Potential end users must rely on well-founded safety data. Thus, a risk to benefit assessment of the envisioned combined therapeutic and diagnostic ("theranostic") applications is fundamentally important to bridge the translational gap between laboratory and clinics. The COST Action CM1403 "The European Upconversion Network-From the Design of Photon-Upconverting Nanomaterials to Biomedical Applications" integrates research on UCNPs ranging from fundamental materials synthesis and research, detection instrumentation, biofunctionalization, and bioassay development to toxicity testing. Such an interdisciplinary approach is necessary for a better and safer theranostic use of UCNPs. Here, the status of nanotoxicity research on UCNPs is compared to other nanomaterials, and routes for the translation of UCNPs into clinical applications are delineated.
    Keywords: Bioimaging ; Efficacy Quality and Safety (Eqs) ; Lanthanides ; Nanosafety ; Research Development and Innovation (R&D&I) ; Safe-By-Design ; Theranostics
    ISSN: 21922640
    E-ISSN: 2192-2659
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