Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, 2014, Vol.40(2), pp.159-168
    Description: Byline: K. Eckert (1), N. Janssen (1), O. Ackermann (2), B. Schweiger (3), E. Radeloff (1), P. Liedgens (1) Keywords: Ultrasound; Supracondylar fracture; Humerus; Elbow; Children Abstract: Purpose The objective of our study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of ultrasound (US) compared to standard radiographs in diagnosing supracondylar fractures (SCFs) of the humerus in children. Patients and methods A total of 106 children (aged between 1 and 13 years) with clinically suspected SCF of the humerus were primarily examined by US followed by standard two-plane radiographs of the elbow. US was conducted with a linear scanner viewing the distal humerus from seven standardized sectional planes. US fracture diagnosis was established either by a cortical bulging or cortical gap, or by a positive dorsal fat pad (dFP) sign. X-ray diagnosis was stated by an independent pediatric radiologist and, afterwards, compared to our US findings. Sonographic and radiographic findings were collected in a contingency table. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), and positive predictive value (PPV) for US fracture diagnosis were calculated according to the radiographs. In addition, by identifying significant angulation and/or disrupture, SCFs were classified as non-operative/stable and operative/instable SCFs according to the AO Pediatric Fracture Classification System. Results By US, a SCF could be excluded in 43 patients and in 63 patients, a fracture was diagnosed. In contrast, by radiographs, an SCF could be excluded in 46 patients and in 60 patients, a fracture was diagnosed. For US fracture diagnosis in comparison to radiographs, we calculated a sensitivity of 100 %, a specificity of 93.5 %, an NPV of 100 %, and a PPV of 95.2 %. Thirty-nine SCFs were sonographically classified as stable grades 1/2 SCFs and confirmed in 37 patients by X-rays. All four operative/instable SCFs were correctly identified by US. Conclusion By identifying a positive dFP sign and/or cortical lesions of the distal humerus, SCFs can be detected very sensitively by US. Even the estimation of fracture displacement seems to be possible. We suggest US as an applicable alternative method in the primary evaluation of suspected SCF in children, guiding further diagnostics, where appropriate. After minor injuries, if clinical assessment for an elbow fracture is low and US examination is negative for fracture, additional radiographs are dispensable. Thereby, the amount of X-ray burden during childhood can be reduced, without loss of diagnostic safety. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of Pediatric Surgery, Elisabeth Hospital Essen, Klara-Kopp-Weg 1, 45138, Essen, Germany (2) Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Klinikum Duisburg, Duisburg, Germany (3) Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 20/05/2013 Received Date: 12/02/2013 Accepted Date: 19/05/2013 Online Date: 11/06/2013
    Keywords: Ultrasound ; Supracondylar fracture ; Humerus ; Elbow ; Children
    ISSN: 1863-9933
    E-ISSN: 1863-9941
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Science, 08/19/2011, Vol.333(6045), pp.936-937
    Keywords: Ecosystem ; Extinction, Biological;
    ISSN: 0036-8075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Science, 08/30/2013, Vol.341(6149), pp.958-958
    Keywords: Environment ; Law Enforcement ; Conservation of Natural Resources -- Legislation & Jurisprudence;
    ISSN: 0036-8075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Science, 07/10/2015, Vol.349(6244), pp.177-180
    Description: Bucking the trendResponses to climate change have been observed across many species. There is a general trend for species to shift their ranges poleward or up in elevation. Not all species, however, can make such shifts, and these species might experience more rapid declines. Kerr et al. looked at data on bumblebees across North America and Europe over the past 110 years. Bumblebees have not shifted northward and are experiencing shrinking distributions in the southern ends of their range. Such failures to shift may be because of their origins in a cooler climate, and suggest an elevated susceptibility to rapid climate change.Science, this issue p. 177 For many species, geographical ranges are expanding toward the poles in response to climate change, while remaining stable along range edges nearest the equator. Using long-term observations across Europe and North America over 110 years, we tested for climate change-related range shifts in bumblebee species across the full extents of their latitudinal and thermal limits and movements along elevation gradients. We found cross-continentally consistent trends in failures to track warming through time at species' northern range limits, range losses from southern range limits, and shifts to higher elevations among southern species. These effects are independent of changing land uses or pesticide applications and underscore the need to test for climate impacts at both leading and trailing latitudinal and thermal limits for species.
    Keywords: Data Processing ; Climatic Changes ; Land Use ; Pesticide Applications ; Bombus ; General;
    ISSN: 0036-8075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Science, 10/16/2015, Vol.350(6258), pp.287-287
    ISSN: 0036-8075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
    Source: American Association for the Advancement of Science (via CrossRef)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Biological Conservation, August 2017, Vol.212, pp.216-229
    Description: Responses of hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) to climate change remain mostly unexplored. Here, for the first time, we investigate the impact of climate change on both presence/absence and abundances of hoverfly species. We used generalized linear models to analyse the relationships of climatic and soil variables with the occurrence and abundance of species on the Balkan Peninsula. Our results show that the ranges of all and the abundances of many species are projected to decrease in the future. Climatically suitable conditions for mountainous species are predicted to generally shift northwards. Species adapted to high mountains are projected to almost vanish from the Balkans and only regions of the Alps would remain suitable for them. We found climatic variables were more important in determining abundance than occurrence. Given that environmental factors differed in terms of their impact on abundance and occurrence, we highlight the importance of monitoring both parameters to ensure effective conservation. Considering the different projected responses of hoverflies to future climate change, as well as their value as pollinators and the increasing threats they currently face, knowledge on their responses to the major drivers of their life-histories is indispensable for proper management and conservation action. We reveal that nationally-designated protected areas are insufficient to conserve the species considered here, both currently and under projected climate change. We recommend implementation of an integrated conservation management plan that can provide a continuum of protected areas along the Dinaric mountain chain to facilitate movement of species to enhance species survival.
    Keywords: Abundance ; Climate Change ; Species Distribution Modeling ; Syrphids ; Pollinator Conservation ; Agriculture ; Biology ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0006-3207
    E-ISSN: 18732917
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    In: Family Relations, October 2005, Vol.54(4), pp.512-522
    Description: Because of changes in legislation and policies regarding child welfare, increasing numbers of older children are being placed for adoption. Many of these children are defined as having “special needs” and include children who are at risk for physical, emotional, or behavioral problems. We use Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems theory as a framework to review the literature regarding child and family adjustment to adoption, with particular emphasis on special needs adoptions. We include recommendations for improvements in pre‐ and post‐adoption intervention services based on an ecological model.
    Keywords: Adoption ; Ecological Systems Theory ; Family Ecology ; Special Needs Adoption
    ISSN: 0197-6664
    E-ISSN: 1741-3729
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Web Ecology, Nov 26, 2015, Vol.15(1), p.49
    Description: Loss of biodiversity under climate change is on the top of European research agendas. However, there is a huge gap between the scientific and the educational communities: Only a small amount of current knowledge reaches the young generation. We faced the challenge of how to transfer results of biodiversity research to the reality of school classrooms - in a way that raises interest, awareness and motivation among students from the age of 12 to 19. We developed the educational software PRONAS (PROjections of NAture for Schools) to show how scientists handle questions about the impact of climate change on the habitats of many European species. About 50 European plant and animal species have been used to demonstrate habitat losses, habitat shifts, and mismatch of habitat dynamics of interacting species. The software was developed with a bottom-up approach, and a manual for applying the software in the classroom was written in close cooperation with teachers. We included specific elements of didactic approaches such as storylines describing future scenarios, projections and simulations of species' future climatic niches, as well as the combination of virtual and real excursions. PRONAS is freely accessible in German and English on http://www.ufz.de/pronas-lernsoftware. Feedback was given by about 100 teachers from German and other European schools at six teacher workshops and by 141 students from four German schools. While most teachers confirmed that the designed format of knowledge transfer is attractive and contributes to knowledge building and awareness raising, many students older than 16 felt under-challenged. Altogether, we found that "educational software" is a useful format for scientific outreach which is worth joint efforts of scientists and educators and which needs more support and incentives for scientists to go forward in this direction.
    Keywords: Instructional Materials – Usage ; Educational Software – Usage
    ISSN: 2193-3081
    ISSN: 13991183
    E-ISSN: 13991183
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Biological Conservation, July 2015, Vol.187, pp.41-50
    Description: Advances in phenology and pole- and up-ward shifts in geographic ranges are well-documented signs that species are responding to climate change. A deeper understanding of such responses across ecologically different species groups will help to assess future consequences for entire ecosystems. A less well-studied pattern linked with climate change is increases in abundances of warm-adapted species compared with cold-adapted species. To compare how recent climate change has affected the abundances of species across different taxonomic groups, we analyzed long-term local population trends and related them to the species temperature niche, as inferred from geographic distributions. We used population data sets collected in different regions of Central Europe, primarily Germany, for bats, birds, butterflies, ground beetles, springtails and dry grassland plants. We found that temperature niche was positively associated with long-term population trends in some of the taxonomic groups (birds, butterflies, ground beetles) but was less important in others (bats, springtails, and grassland plants). This variation in the importance of temperature niche suggested that some populations have been affected more than others by climate change, which may be explained by differences in species attributes, such as generation time and microhabitat preference. Our findings indicate that relating temperature niches of species to population trends is a useful method to quantify the impact of climate change on local population abundances. We show that this widely applicable approach is particularly suited for comparative cross-system analyses to identify which types of organisms, in which habitats, are responding the most to climate change.
    Keywords: Population Trends ; Thermal Niche ; Environmental Drivers ; Comparative Analysis ; Species Traits ; Agriculture ; Biology ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0006-3207
    E-ISSN: 18732917
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    In: Molecular Ecology, December 2004, Vol.13(12), pp.3645-3655
    Description: Habitat fragmentation is a major force affecting demography and genetic structure of wild populations, especially in agricultural landscapes. The land snail (L.) was selected to investigate the impact of habitat fragmentation on the spatial genetic structure of an organism with limited dispersal ability. Genetic and morphological patterns were investigated at a local scale of a 500 m transect and a mesoscale of 4 × 4 km in a fragmented agricultural landscape while accounting for variation in the landscape using least‐cost models. Analysis of microsatellite loci using expected heterozygosity (), pairwise genetic distance (/1 − ) and spatial autocorrelograms (Moran's ) as well as shell characteristics revealed spatial structuring at both scales and provided evidence for a metapopulation structure. Genetic diversity was related to morphological diversity regardless of landscape properties. This pointed to bottlenecks caused by founder effects after (re)colonization. Our study suggests that metapopulation structure depended on both landscape features and the shape of the dispersal function. A range of genetic spatial autocorrelation up to 80 m at the local scale and up to 800 m at the mesoscale indicated leptokurtic dispersal patterns. The metapopulation dynamics of resulted in a patchwork of interconnected, spatially structured subpopulations. They were shaped by gene flow which was affected by landscape features, the dispersal function and an increasing role of genetic drift with distance.
    Keywords: Effective Distance ; Gene Flow ; Habitat Fragmentation ; Isolation By Distance ; Moran'S ; Stepping Stone Model
    ISSN: 0962-1083
    E-ISSN: 1365-294X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages